Early 'Find My' code appears to back reports of Tile-style 'tag' tracker

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited June 4
Code uncovered by an iOS developer appears to support rumors that that Apple's Find My app will support an unannounced Tile-like tracking device.

iOS 13 Find My


"Tag1,1" is listed as a device in first-generation beta code for Find My, Steve Moser noted on Tuesday. Apple only uses "1,1" to designate a product as the first of its kind.

Other strings in the code include "DEVICE_OR_ITEM_ENTER_MESSAGE_LEGEND" and "DEVICE_OR_ITEM_ENTER_PHONE_NUMBER_LEGEND." Traditionally, Find My's predecessors have only been used to track first-party hardware like iPhones, iPads, and AirPods.

An April report correctly predicted that Apple would merge Find My iPhone and Find My Friends into a single app. It also indicated however that Apple would let people track anything else they want by way of a "tag" product codenamed "B389." Like the Tile, such an accessory might notify people if they get too far away, or help track down missing or stolen goods through the widespread network of Apple products.

Apple in fact confirmed that by way of Bluetooth beacons, Find My includes the ability to discover devices even when they're offline. That concept is identical to Tile's.

The company may need to forge some sort of agreement with Tile to avoid lawsuits, especially since the two companies are close partners. Tile was one of the first developers to support Siri Shortcuts in iOS 12.

That said, Apple patented technology for Find My, including the use of Tile-style beacons, in 2016.



Comments

  • Reply 1 of 6
    22july201322july2013 Posts: 820member
    Code uncovered by an iOS developer appears to support rumors that that Apple's Find My app will support an unannounced Tile-like tracking device.
    That concept is identical to Tile's.
    The company may need to forge some sort of agreement with Tile to avoid lawsuits, especially since the two companies are close partners. 
    I'm confused. Even if the concept is identical to Tile's, this article didn't say Tile's approach was patented. Is that supposed to be obvious? What if Tile is licensing their patent from someone else on a non-exclusive basis? There are many scenarios in which Apple could use the patent, which I won't try to enumerate, including Apple licensing it itself. 

  • Reply 2 of 6
    Someone is about to get Sherlocked.
    donjuanfastasleepjony0
  • Reply 3 of 6
    gutengelgutengel Posts: 333member
    I wonder how much it will cost. This is obviously going to be part of subscription/services revenue for Apple.
  • Reply 4 of 6
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 3,171member
    gutengel said:
    I wonder how much it will cost. This is obviously going to be part of subscription/services revenue for Apple.
    How is that obvious, versus just a $49 (or whatever) hardware tag one-time purchase?
  • Reply 5 of 6
    Bluetooth GuyBluetooth Guy Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    I read this story last year in regards to this. Not only Apple, (basically the bluetooth consortium), have been discussing leveraging the Tile concept and creating bluetooth beacons. i'll try and find the sauce, but this has been in the works for a while. I imagine Tile will be paid hefty to give up licensing rights
  • Reply 6 of 6
    toysandmetoysandme Posts: 221member
    The first Pebble and other wearables warned you when you forgot your phone at home or in a restaurant. The Apple Watch displays a red rectangle with a line crossing it but does not vibrate to get your attention. Come on Apple. Add a couple of lines of code in there and fix this. 
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