ARKit 3 features restricted to latest iPhones and iPads

Posted:
in iOS
Apple's upcoming ARKit 3 feature set, which include People Occlusion and motion capture, will only be available to users of current-generation iPhones and iPads, the company revealed this week.

ARKit 3


According to fine print buried at the bottom of an Apple Developer webpage detailing the company's augmented reality technology, advanced features in ARKit 3 will be limited to devices with A12 Bionic chip variants or better.

Currently, the A12 Bionic powers Apple's iPhone XR, iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max, while the more robust A12X Bionic is found in the 11-inch iPad Pro and third-generation 12.9-inch iPad Pro.

"People Occlusion and the use of motion capture, simultaneous front and back camera, and multiple face tracking are supported on devices with A12/A12X Bionic chips, ANE, and TrueDepth Camera," Apple says.

Shown off onstage at Monday's Worldwide Developers Conference keynote, ARKit 3 boasts a number of enhancements designed to streamline AR compositing and effects.

New for 2019 are complex assets like the aforementioned People Occlusion, which automatically detects humans, allowing AR objects to pass behind and in front of them. Motion capture is another new feature that determines a person's body position and translates that information into user input.

Both People Occlusion and motion tracking are apparently extremely processor intensive, prompting Apple to level the A12 Bionic or higher chip requirement.

Additionally, ARKit 3 support simultaneous front and back camera input and multiple face tracking, the latter of which can track up to three faces and is compatible with TrueDepth camera systems found in iPhone X, XR, XS and XS Max, as well as the latest iPad Pro models.

ARKit 3 is part of iOS 13 and will debut this fall.
gregalexander

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 20
    ericthehalfbeeericthehalfbee Posts: 4,068member
    Fine by me. Making a feature available to older devices means limiting its abilities to what the least powerful device is capable of.
    repressthistmayAppleExposedwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 20
    mike fixmike fix Posts: 244member
    Maybe this means there will be an iPhone SE 2 in the near future.  
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 20
    iPad Mini 2019 has an A12 chip. But I don't know what ANE is and I don't know if it has a True Depth Camera?
    Also, you didn't mention the new iPad Touch. It surely has the A12.
    AppleExposed
  • Reply 4 of 20
    racerhomie3racerhomie3 Posts: 1,096member
    Give us the AR glasses apple !
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 5 of 20
    libertyforalllibertyforall Posts: 1,294member
    That is CRAP that iPhone X is not supported!
  • Reply 6 of 20
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,148member
    That is CRAP that iPhone X is not supported!
    No, it's not "crap". You honestly think they artificially blocked iPhone X support? Why would they do that? For the MILLIONS of people that give a shit or even know about ARKIT3? (sarcasm). What they showed was extremely impressive and takes an insane amount of processing power, so I'm not surprised that only their latest mobile chips can handle it.
    rayboStrangeDaystmaywatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 20
    That is CRAP that iPhone X is not supported!
    Considering ARKIT3 isn’t useful at the moment... I wouldn’t be to worried.  

    When the cool stuff arrives (2-3 years?) you’ll probably have a new phone.

    I second the desire for AR glasses (some else desired), unfortunately it’s proving more complicated than developers thought.  You really need the ability to adjust the distance between the eyes & screen (for each person) or it causes headaches and eye strain.
    AppleExposedwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 20
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,259member
    iPad Mini 2019 has an A12 chip. But I don't know what ANE is and I don't know if it has a True Depth Camera?
    Also, you didn't mention the new iPad Touch. It surely has the A12.
    iPod Touch has the A10 Fusion Chip.
    AppleExposedwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 20
    iPad Mini 2019 has an A12 chip. But I don't know what ANE is and I don't know if it has a True Depth Camera?
    Also, you didn't mention the new iPad Touch. It surely has the A12.
    ANE is Apple Neural Engine...can’t recall if it is directly accessible to developers or another special component only Apple is privy to access or to give proxy access to developers via particular Apple frameworks.
    AppleOutsider23232watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 20
    That is CRAP that iPhone X is not supported!
    Considering ARKIT3 isn’t useful at the moment... I wouldn’t be to worried.  

    When the cool stuff arrives (2-3 years?) you’ll probably have a new phone. 
    I hope you’re right. I’ve said from the start that ARKit is cool tech and makes a good demo but I was having difficulty seeing how it would go beyond that (I was also told not to “crap on it” before developers had their chance to show us what they could do, right here on these forums). ARKit was released in 2017 (I think), and 2 years in there still aren’t very good uses for it. Measure is kinda cool but not always accurate. I’ve tried a couple apps that let you place furniture in your room. Again, that’s neat but I hope that isn’t the pinnacle of Augmented Reality.  Maybe it’s just waiting for the proper device and iPhones and iPads aren’t it.
    muthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 20
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,148member
    That is CRAP that iPhone X is not supported!
    Considering ARKIT3 isn’t useful at the moment... I wouldn’t be to worried.  

    When the cool stuff arrives (2-3 years?) you’ll probably have a new phone. 
    I hope you’re right. I’ve said from the start that ARKit is cool tech and makes a good demo but I was having difficulty seeing how it would go beyond that (I was also told not to “crap on it” before developers had their chance to show us what they could do, right here on these forums). ARKit was released in 2017 (I think), and 2 years in there still aren’t very good uses for it. Measure is kinda cool but not always accurate. I’ve tried a couple apps that let you place furniture in your room. Again, that’s neat but I hope that isn’t the pinnacle of Augmented Reality.  Maybe it’s just waiting for the proper device and iPhones and iPads aren’t it.
    This stuff is all beta tests and getting devs comfortable with the tech and users familiar with the concept. They're building out the tools and use cases, so when they launch their dedicated AR product (in whatever form that will be), there will be a rich and powerful dev environment. And that's clearly where this is all headed. 
    StrangeDaystmaywatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 20
    slurpy said:
    That is CRAP that iPhone X is not supported!
    Considering ARKIT3 isn’t useful at the moment... I wouldn’t be to worried.  

    When the cool stuff arrives (2-3 years?) you’ll probably have a new phone. 
    I hope you’re right. I’ve said from the start that ARKit is cool tech and makes a good demo but I was having difficulty seeing how it would go beyond that (I was also told not to “crap on it” before developers had their chance to show us what they could do, right here on these forums). ARKit was released in 2017 (I think), and 2 years in there still aren’t very good uses for it. Measure is kinda cool but not always accurate. I’ve tried a couple apps that let you place furniture in your room. Again, that’s neat but I hope that isn’t the pinnacle of Augmented Reality.  Maybe it’s just waiting for the proper device and iPhones and iPads aren’t it.
    This stuff is all beta tests and getting devs comfortable with the tech and users familiar with the concept. They're building out the tools and use cases, so when they launch their dedicated AR product (in whatever form that will be), there will be a rich and powerful dev environment. And that's clearly where this is all headed. 
    Yeah, people occlusion would be a must for AR to work properly on glasses or a HUD in a car. From that standpoint, building out the tools now and refining them makes a lot of sense. If some kind of AR glasses are in the future I also believe Apple needs to have a CPU that 1) will fit into the frames and 2) won’t melt them from the heat generated for this stuff to work (have you ever used FaceTime and Animoji on an iPhone?) and 3) not completely drain the likely small battery. So, again, getting this stuff working and refined now while easing toward future hardware is clearly the right way to go.

    Still, so far iPhones and iPads don’t seem like the proper devices. I also wonder if there will really be much developer support for AR glasses. It at least seems possible that in such a product the first-party apps and solutions may be the primary ones, much like on Apple Watch.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 20
    mobirdmobird Posts: 139member
    If i recall, when Tim Cook introduced ARkit did he not talk about the millions of the "installed base" of iOS devices that would take advantage of AR.
    Anyone who has followed this more closely please jump in and correct me if I have this wrong.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 14 of 20
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 3,789member
    That is CRAP that iPhone X is not supported!
    Considering ARKIT3 isn’t useful at the moment... I wouldn’t be to worried.  

    When the cool stuff arrives (2-3 years?) you’ll probably have a new phone. 
    I hope you’re right. I’ve said from the start that ARKit is cool tech and makes a good demo but I was having difficulty seeing how it would go beyond that (I was also told not to “crap on it” before developers had their chance to show us what they could do, right here on these forums). ARKit was released in 2017 (I think), and 2 years in there still aren’t very good uses for it. Measure is kinda cool but not always accurate. I’ve tried a couple apps that let you place furniture in your room. Again, that’s neat but I hope that isn’t the pinnacle of Augmented Reality.  Maybe it’s just waiting for the proper device and iPhones and iPads aren’t it.
    Not to mention that when it was released, more than a few people here were making a huge deal out of the fact that it supported 200 million phones out of the can.

    Two years on nothing much has really come of it.

    I think this is a prime case of if you really want to be on the AR train, you should hold off until some compelling use for it appears before jumping on the phone. Moreso if it will be your phone for three or four years.

    The OPs point is basically that. Brand new, generational phone (iPhone X) which is less than 2 years old and already not in the ARKit 3 running.


  • Reply 15 of 20
    brertechbrertech Posts: 28member
    mobird said:
    If i recall, when Tim Cook introduced ARkit did he not talk about the millions of the "installed base" of iOS devices that would take advantage of AR.
    Anyone who has followed this more closely please jump in and correct me if I have this wrong.
    You’re correct, but keep in mind that the vast majority of AR features work on the older phones, including many of the other features they added this year.

    Another thing to keep in mind... when ARKit3 actually gets released this Fall, there will be two generations of hardware that support People Occlusion and Motion Capture: last year’s phone/pad and this year’s. By the time apps with those features are widespread, it will likely be three generations.

    The more annoying angle is for developers: simulators won’t cut it, so we absolutely have to have the most recent models to even evaluate this tech.
    mobirdAppleExposedwatto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 20
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,760member
    avon b7 said:
    That is CRAP that iPhone X is not supported!
    Considering ARKIT3 isn’t useful at the moment... I wouldn’t be to worried.  

    When the cool stuff arrives (2-3 years?) you’ll probably have a new phone. 
    I hope you’re right. I’ve said from the start that ARKit is cool tech and makes a good demo but I was having difficulty seeing how it would go beyond that (I was also told not to “crap on it” before developers had their chance to show us what they could do, right here on these forums). ARKit was released in 2017 (I think), and 2 years in there still aren’t very good uses for it. Measure is kinda cool but not always accurate. I’ve tried a couple apps that let you place furniture in your room. Again, that’s neat but I hope that isn’t the pinnacle of Augmented Reality.  Maybe it’s just waiting for the proper device and iPhones and iPads aren’t it.
    Not to mention that when it was released, more than a few people here were making a huge deal out of the fact that it supported 200 million phones out of the can.

    Two years on nothing much has really come of it.

    I think this is a prime case of if you really want to be on the AR train, you should hold off until some compelling use for it appears before jumping on the phone. Moreso if it will be your phone for three or four years.

    The OPs point is basically that. Brand new, generational phone (iPhone X) which is less than 2 years old and already not in the ARKit 3 running.


    "Two years, and nothing much has come of it." Quite the statement from an acknowledged Honor 10 user.

    I saw the demo's during the keynote, so yeah, it's definitely moving forward, hence the ARKit 3 moniker.

    Remember back about a week ago when you were arguing about benchmarks that were posted comparing Kirin unfavorably to A series, and you stated that SOC performance wasn't important.

    Guess what, performance still is relevant. Every generation of A series brings new features that are unavailable to iPhones of an earlier generation, whether those be major or minor.

    As for AR apps on iOS devices, it's all just a run up to some wearable that Apple will deliver when the technology is ready. In the meantime, someone that owns a two year old iPhone X will have the option of trading in for an upgrade.

    Me, I'll be buying the next generation iPhone with a triple lens, assuming the rumors are correct, and I'll be able to enjoy the benefits of ARKit 3.0 as part of that. Next year, Apple will create a more powerful A series SOC, and then I'll likely miss out on something. That's how the market works. 
    AppleExposedwatto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 20
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 901unconfirmed, member
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    That is CRAP that iPhone X is not supported!
    Considering ARKIT3 isn’t useful at the moment... I wouldn’t be to worried.  

    When the cool stuff arrives (2-3 years?) you’ll probably have a new phone. 
    I hope you’re right. I’ve said from the start that ARKit is cool tech and makes a good demo but I was having difficulty seeing how it would go beyond that (I was also told not to “crap on it” before developers had their chance to show us what they could do, right here on these forums). ARKit was released in 2017 (I think), and 2 years in there still aren’t very good uses for it. Measure is kinda cool but not always accurate. I’ve tried a couple apps that let you place furniture in your room. Again, that’s neat but I hope that isn’t the pinnacle of Augmented Reality.  Maybe it’s just waiting for the proper device and iPhones and iPads aren’t it.
    Not to mention that when it was released, more than a few people here were making a huge deal out of the fact that it supported 200 million phones out of the can.

    Two years on nothing much has really come of it.

    I think this is a prime case of if you really want to be on the AR train, you should hold off until some compelling use for it appears before jumping on the phone. Moreso if it will be your phone for three or four years.

    The OPs point is basically that. Brand new, generational phone (iPhone X) which is less than 2 years old and already not in the ARKit 3 running.


    "Two years, and nothing much has come of it." Quite the statement from an acknowledged Honor 10 user.

    I saw the demo's during the keynote, so yeah, it's definitely moving forward, hence the ARKit 3 moniker.

    Remember back about a week ago when you were arguing about benchmarks that were posted comparing Kirin unfavorably to A series, and you stated that SOC performance wasn't important.

    Guess what, performance still is relevant. Every generation of A series brings new features that are unavailable to iPhones of an earlier generation, whether those be major or minor.

    As for AR apps on iOS devices, it's all just a run up to some wearable that Apple will deliver when the technology is ready. In the meantime, someone that owns a two year old iPhone X will have the option of trading in for an upgrade.

    Me, I'll be buying the next generation iPhone with a triple lens, assuming the rumors are correct, and I'll be able to enjoy the benefits of ARKit 3.0 as part of that. Next year, Apple will create a more powerful A series SOC, and then I'll likely miss out on something. That's how the market works. 

    He reminds me of the iKnockoff users who claim "I don't need Apples super fast processors as long as I can open apps quickly".

    The problem is these people see the present while Apple sees the future. Right now there are features that will only be supported on the next iPhone and Apple is preparing for this NOW.
    tmaywatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 20
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,760member
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    That is CRAP that iPhone X is not supported!
    Considering ARKIT3 isn’t useful at the moment... I wouldn’t be to worried.  

    When the cool stuff arrives (2-3 years?) you’ll probably have a new phone. 
    I hope you’re right. I’ve said from the start that ARKit is cool tech and makes a good demo but I was having difficulty seeing how it would go beyond that (I was also told not to “crap on it” before developers had their chance to show us what they could do, right here on these forums). ARKit was released in 2017 (I think), and 2 years in there still aren’t very good uses for it. Measure is kinda cool but not always accurate. I’ve tried a couple apps that let you place furniture in your room. Again, that’s neat but I hope that isn’t the pinnacle of Augmented Reality.  Maybe it’s just waiting for the proper device and iPhones and iPads aren’t it.
    Not to mention that when it was released, more than a few people here were making a huge deal out of the fact that it supported 200 million phones out of the can.

    Two years on nothing much has really come of it.

    I think this is a prime case of if you really want to be on the AR train, you should hold off until some compelling use for it appears before jumping on the phone. Moreso if it will be your phone for three or four years.

    The OPs point is basically that. Brand new, generational phone (iPhone X) which is less than 2 years old and already not in the ARKit 3 running.


    "Two years, and nothing much has come of it." Quite the statement from an acknowledged Honor 10 user.

    I saw the demo's during the keynote, so yeah, it's definitely moving forward, hence the ARKit 3 moniker.

    Remember back about a week ago when you were arguing about benchmarks that were posted comparing Kirin unfavorably to A series, and you stated that SOC performance wasn't important.

    Guess what, performance still is relevant. Every generation of A series brings new features that are unavailable to iPhones of an earlier generation, whether those be major or minor.

    As for AR apps on iOS devices, it's all just a run up to some wearable that Apple will deliver when the technology is ready. In the meantime, someone that owns a two year old iPhone X will have the option of trading in for an upgrade.

    Me, I'll be buying the next generation iPhone with a triple lens, assuming the rumors are correct, and I'll be able to enjoy the benefits of ARKit 3.0 as part of that. Next year, Apple will create a more powerful A series SOC, and then I'll likely miss out on something. That's how the market works. 

    He reminds me of the iKnockoff users who claim "I don't need Apples super fast processors as long as I can open apps quickly".

    The problem is these people see the present while Apple sees the future. Right now there are features that will only be supported on the next iPhone and Apple is preparing for this NOW.
    One thing that the A Series is absolutely bringing to the iPhone is Edge Computing, so that Apple gains realtime features that don't require Cloud Processing, nor even post processing. I'll wait for Apple's announcements in September, but I expect that Apple will add a number of realtime, user focussed features that "just work".
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 20
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,251member
    mike fix said:
    Maybe this means there will be an iPhone SE 2 in the near future.  
    I doubt this portents an SE 2. That said, I'd be all over one if Apple decides to update/upgrade the SE 'line'. Even if they did/do update/upgrade it, it won't be AR worthy. I don't see Apple investing that much in the SE form factor, if anything at all for an SE 2.

    I'm not saying it won't happen, because I really want an SE 2 even if it doesn't do AR. It just seem unlikely to me that Apple would make this AR capable. I don't feel Pokemon counts.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 20
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 3,789member
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    That is CRAP that iPhone X is not supported!
    Considering ARKIT3 isn’t useful at the moment... I wouldn’t be to worried.  

    When the cool stuff arrives (2-3 years?) you’ll probably have a new phone. 
    I hope you’re right. I’ve said from the start that ARKit is cool tech and makes a good demo but I was having difficulty seeing how it would go beyond that (I was also told not to “crap on it” before developers had their chance to show us what they could do, right here on these forums). ARKit was released in 2017 (I think), and 2 years in there still aren’t very good uses for it. Measure is kinda cool but not always accurate. I’ve tried a couple apps that let you place furniture in your room. Again, that’s neat but I hope that isn’t the pinnacle of Augmented Reality.  Maybe it’s just waiting for the proper device and iPhones and iPads aren’t it.
    Not to mention that when it was released, more than a few people here were making a huge deal out of the fact that it supported 200 million phones out of the can.

    Two years on nothing much has really come of it.

    I think this is a prime case of if you really want to be on the AR train, you should hold off until some compelling use for it appears before jumping on the phone. Moreso if it will be your phone for three or four years.

    The OPs point is basically that. Brand new, generational phone (iPhone X) which is less than 2 years old and already not in the ARKit 3 running.


    "Two years, and nothing much has come of it." Quite the statement from an acknowledged Honor 10 user.

    I saw the demo's during the keynote, so yeah, it's definitely moving forward, hence the ARKit 3 moniker.

    Remember back about a week ago when you were arguing about benchmarks that were posted comparing Kirin unfavorably to A series, and you stated that SOC performance wasn't important.

    Guess what, performance still is relevant. Every generation of A series brings new features that are unavailable to iPhones of an earlier generation, whether those be major or minor.

    As for AR apps on iOS devices, it's all just a run up to some wearable that Apple will deliver when the technology is ready. In the meantime, someone that owns a two year old iPhone X will have the option of trading in for an upgrade.

    Me, I'll be buying the next generation iPhone with a triple lens, assuming the rumors are correct, and I'll be able to enjoy the benefits of ARKit 3.0 as part of that. Next year, Apple will create a more powerful A series SOC, and then I'll likely miss out on something. That's how the market works. 
    Yes, ARKit is moving forward but nothing much has really come of it. The statement stands and is supported by reality. AR just hasn't really moved the needle anywhere.

    There were demoes at the original launch too. What we need is a compelling reason for users to use the framework.

    Being an Honor 10 user is irrelevant.

    No idea why you are mentioning benchmarks here.

    Performance is relative to what you can do with it. The whole point of saying 200 million iPhone users could benefit from ARKit out of the box was precisely to claim that they had the performance (relative to the year) to jump on the AR train. The problem was the train didn't really leave the station.

    Everything I stated remains as is. If AR is important for you because you believe something compelling is in the pipe, you will be better off waiting until the product actually arrives and then take a decision on what phone you need to get the most out of it.
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