App & Web developers asked to put 'Sign in with Apple' above all other sign-in buttons

Posted:
in iOS
Apple's rules for the upcoming "Sign in with Apple" feature in iOS 13 include urging developers to put its button above any social media alternatives, according to official Human Interface Guidelines.

Sign in with Apple


To position the button "correctly" in a stacked layout, developers should "place the Sign In with Apple button above the other buttons," the company says. Apple also recommends making its button "the same size or larger" than competition.

Though those particular rules aren't obligatory, the company has already come under some critcism for making "Sign in with Apple" mandatory if apps intend to offer rival sign-ins via services like Facebook, Google, and Twitter. Apple's button is intended as a response to those options, eliminating tracking concerns through privacy-oriented policies and the use of spoof forwarding addresses for email, allowing people to shut off connections on the fly.

Testing of "Sign in with Apple" will begin later this summer ahead of iOS 13's fall launch window.

Initially Apple's rules don't seem to create obstacles for apps with native login systems or those that avoid third-party sign-on buttons, Reuters noted. Even on the Web, though, Apple is still asking developers to make "Sign in with Apple" the most prominent button.

The company could come under pressure to drop any mandatory inclusion given antitrust scrutiny by the U.S. Justice Department. CEO Tim Cook has called this examination "fair," but insisted that Apple doesn't have any sort of monopoly, even though it bans iPhone and iPad developers from selling apps anywhere but the App Store.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 31
    genovellegenovelle Posts: 967member
    Considering it is in an Apple platform app on an Apple device...
    jbdragoncat52toysandmelolliverllamawatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 2 of 31
    The buttons (Facebook and Google, anyway) that I usually see are stacked alphabetically so putting Apple at the top makes sense to me, from that perspective.
    agilealtitudecat52toysandmelollivermobirdwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 3 of 31
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 7,953member
     CEO Tim Cook has called this examination "fair," but insisted that Apple doesn't have any sort of monopoly, even though it bans iPhone and iPad developers from selling apps anywhere but the App Store.
    Wait, so app devs can't sell their apps on the Android Play store or other platforms? News to me.
    Solilolliverllamawatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 31
    Good. I approve.

    jbdragoncat52toysandmelolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 31
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,652member
     CEO Tim Cook has called this examination "fair," but insisted that Apple doesn't have any sort of monopoly, even though it bans iPhone and iPad developers from selling apps anywhere but the App Store.
    Wait, so app devs can't sell their apps on the Android Play store or other platforms? News to me.
    I found this odd too... 

    is it during those rimes when Apple signs an exclusivity agreement maybe?
  • Reply 6 of 31
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,722member
    sflocal said:
     CEO Tim Cook has called this examination "fair," but insisted that Apple doesn't have any sort of monopoly, even though it bans iPhone and iPad developers from selling apps anywhere but the App Store.
    Wait, so app devs can't sell their apps on the Android Play store or other platforms? News to me.
    I found this odd too... 

    is it during those rimes when Apple signs an exclusivity agreement maybe?
    You and StrangeDays seem so confused about it all. Such a mystery why ANYONE could possible think Apple had a lock on approving and selling 3rd party apps to half the US smartphone installed base, and by far the most potentially profitable segment of US consumers.
    edited June 5
  • Reply 7 of 31
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,923member
    sflocal said:
     CEO Tim Cook has called this examination "fair," but insisted that Apple doesn't have any sort of monopoly, even though it bans iPhone and iPad developers from selling apps anywhere but the App Store.
    Wait, so app devs can't sell their apps on the Android Play store or other platforms? News to me.
    I found this odd too... 

    is it during those rimes when Apple signs an exclusivity agreement maybe?
    I think what it means is that iPhone and iPad developers cannot sell iOS apps anywhere other than the App Store.
    canukstormjbdragongatorguytoysandmellama
  • Reply 8 of 31
    flydogflydog Posts: 298member


    The company could come under pressure to drop any mandatory inclusion given antitrust scrutiny by the U.S. Justice Department. CEO Tim Cook has called this examination "fair," but insisted that Apple doesn't have any sort of monopoly, even though it bans iPhone and iPad developers from selling apps anywhere but the App Store.
    Apple does not ban developers from selling apps outside of the App Store.  The App Store is the only marketplace where a developer can sell iOS apps, but developers are free to sell apps on other platforms such as Android, and as web apps that may be used on any device. 
    StrangeDaystoysandmelolliver
  • Reply 9 of 31
    boboliciousbobolicious Posts: 567member
    ...so while Apple is buffering against 3rd party tracking (carefully worded statements by Apple?) and email harvesting, is Apple able to track everything, encrypted or not...? If so will all this data be some of the most verifiable and thus valuable information in due time...?
    edited June 5
  • Reply 10 of 31
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,133unconfirmed, member
    Looks like Apple gains no monetary value from this.

    In that case, bravo Apple!
    cat52toysandmelolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 31
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 2,134member
    Google forces those that want to use Android to have their own services front and center!!! This is a huge advantage over then if they wanted to offer their own service and generally they end up failing. Samesung's Music Service MILK for example. Why use it when Google is right there.

    I NEVER use the Login with Google or Facebook. I just end up create a new account directly at the site instead as I don't want either of them to also be tracking me like that.

    Apple is ONLY forcing those app's in Apple's own app store that use either of those to also include Apple's. How many apps in the app store even use Google or Facebook Login?!?!? I don't think it's all that many. Most of the time I only see it at some new Web site that I don't have account at and want to create a new account. Then the show Google and Facebook. Apple can't force any of those sites to add Apple's. But it is easy to add Apple. I'd use it if sites offered it. But I'm going to assume most won't as they couldn't spy on you as much as they would like to make money from you.

    Most apps in the app store if they need you to create a account, don't use either of them. You just create a account the normal way. Some allow you to turn on FaceID or TouchID Login after that. I just don't see Apple's sign in Link being used much anywhere. I don't see many apps actually needing for it to be required as they don't have Google and Facebook sign in anyway. While I think it's a great idea and I hope I'm wrong, only time will tell.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 31
    Looks like Apple gains no monetary value from this.

    In that case, bravo Apple!
    Especially when you consider Apple had to pay someone to code it up in the first place.

    lolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 31

    ...so while Apple is buffering against 3rd party tracking (carefully worded statements by Apple?) and email harvesting, is Apple able to track everything, encrypted or not...? If so will all this data be some of the most verifiable and thus valuable information in due time...?
    Apple says they don't have access to the data.  

    lolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 31
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,154member
    gatorguy said:
    sflocal said:
     CEO Tim Cook has called this examination "fair," but insisted that Apple doesn't have any sort of monopoly, even though it bans iPhone and iPad developers from selling apps anywhere but the App Store.
    Wait, so app devs can't sell their apps on the Android Play store or other platforms? News to me.
    I found this odd too... 

    is it during those rimes when Apple signs an exclusivity agreement maybe?
    You and StrangeDays seem so confused about it all. Such a mystery why ANYONE could possible think Apple had a lock on approving and selling 3rd party apps to half the US smartphone installed base, and by far the most potentially profitable segment of US consumers.
    I'm very curious about something. Do you ACTUALLY think that even if Apple allowed 3rd party appstores on iOS, that they would get ANY kind of mainstream usage? Why the hell would 99.99% of people want to use these stores, instead of the appstore? Do you honestly think developers would find ANY success using an unofficial store? The apps that would be sold there will most likely all be relegated to trash-tier garbage that would not be fit for the official apptore (which doesn't have very high standards to begin with), and shady shit. It would compromise iOS security, add customer confusion, and provide little to no benefit to the VAST majority of Apple's customers. And for what?

    To superficially please a TINY, vocal percentage of people clamoring for this online, almost all of whom probably hate Apple to begin with and aren't arguing in good faith, and will just move on to the next thing to whine about? I fail to see how any reasonable person could think that 3rd party appstores would be a net advantage to anyone, except those with the desire to sell shady stuff with no rules.  

    Also, it's funny how you and people like you claim that Apple is a monopoly when it's convenient (like in this case) and then mock them for their "low marketshare" when THAT is convenient (ie. comparing iPhone sales to total number of all Android devices sold by every single manufacturer, worldwide). So which is it? 
    edited June 5 StrangeDayslolliverllamawatto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 31
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,722member
    slurpy said:
    gatorguy said:
    sflocal said:
     CEO Tim Cook has called this examination "fair," but insisted that Apple doesn't have any sort of monopoly, even though it bans iPhone and iPad developers from selling apps anywhere but the App Store.
    Wait, so app devs can't sell their apps on the Android Play store or other platforms? News to me.
    I found this odd too... 

    is it during those rimes when Apple signs an exclusivity agreement maybe?
    You and StrangeDays seem so confused about it all. Such a mystery why ANYONE could possible think Apple had a lock on approving and selling 3rd party apps to half the US smartphone installed base, and by far the most potentially profitable segment of US consumers.
    I'm very curious about something. Do you ACTUALLY think that even if Apple allowed 3rd party appstores on iOS, that they would get ANY kind of mainstream usage?
    Probably not, but it would keep Apple in the clear from some of these lawsuits and antitrust investigations over it, and TBH there's danger at least one or two of them may end up legally decided rather than voluntarily. I don't think that would be in Apple's best interests.

    I didn't bother replying to the end of your post as that wouldn't apply to me anyway. Not my claims.
    edited June 5 muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 16 of 31
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,154member
    gatorguy said:
    slurpy said:
    gatorguy said:
    sflocal said:
     CEO Tim Cook has called this examination "fair," but insisted that Apple doesn't have any sort of monopoly, even though it bans iPhone and iPad developers from selling apps anywhere but the App Store.
    Wait, so app devs can't sell their apps on the Android Play store or other platforms? News to me.
    I found this odd too... 

    is it during those rimes when Apple signs an exclusivity agreement maybe?
    You and StrangeDays seem so confused about it all. Such a mystery why ANYONE could possible think Apple had a lock on approving and selling 3rd party apps to half the US smartphone installed base, and by far the most potentially profitable segment of US consumers.
    I'm very curious about something. Do you ACTUALLY think that even if Apple allowed 3rd party appstores on iOS, that they would get ANY kind of mainstream usage?
    Probably not, but it would keep Apple in the clear from some of these lawsuits and antitrust investigations over it, and TBH there's danger at least one or two of them many end up legally decided rather than voluntarily
    So you admit that these stores would be pretty much useless for consumers and offer no real benefit while opening many more problems, and that the entire exercise would be solely for legal cover? Seems like a shitty philosophical strategy for product development that won't lead to anything good. How would it even work? There would be zero curation? Porn, pedophilia, etc? Who would be responsible for removing this stuff? Where does the buck stop? Will the store have access to all the same APIs? And if it doesn't, wouldn't Apple be accused of anti-competitiveness? 

    Also, how many Android users use something other than the Play Store? Android, the platform that is supposedly meant for those who champion "open" and tech geeks? Probably close to 0%. 
    edited June 5 lolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 31
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,722member
    slurpy said:
    gatorguy said:
    slurpy said:
    gatorguy said:
    sflocal said:
     CEO Tim Cook has called this examination "fair," but insisted that Apple doesn't have any sort of monopoly, even though it bans iPhone and iPad developers from selling apps anywhere but the App Store.
    Wait, so app devs can't sell their apps on the Android Play store or other platforms? News to me.
    I found this odd too... 

    is it during those rimes when Apple signs an exclusivity agreement maybe?
    You and StrangeDays seem so confused about it all. Such a mystery why ANYONE could possible think Apple had a lock on approving and selling 3rd party apps to half the US smartphone installed base, and by far the most potentially profitable segment of US consumers.
    I'm very curious about something. Do you ACTUALLY think that even if Apple allowed 3rd party appstores on iOS, that they would get ANY kind of mainstream usage?
    Probably not, but it would keep Apple in the clear from some of these lawsuits and antitrust investigations over it, and TBH there's danger at least one or two of them many end up legally decided rather than voluntarily
    So you admit that these stores would be pretty much useless for consumers and offer no real benefit while opening many more problems, and that the entire exercise would be solely for legal cover? Seems like a shitty philosophical strategy for product development that won't lead to anything good. 

    Also, how many Android users use something other than the Play Store? Android, the platform that is supposedly meant for those who champion "open" and tech geeks? Probably close to 0%. 
    Not really sure as I've not seen any stats on it. The Chinese stores seem to be successful but Google Play isn't available, and others such as Amazon's App Store (safe), F-Droid (OK too) and Aptoide (that's a whole nest of stolen apps with hidden "features" and questionable origin there BTW) are mentioned quite often so apparently they have their fans.

    I would assume that where Google Play is available most people would use it, especially as it's the default. Companies realize users don't generally mess with the default settings, which as an aside is an indicator what those companies real positions are based on on what the out-of-the-box setting is IMO.
    edited June 5
  • Reply 18 of 31
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 7,953member
    gatorguy said:
    sflocal said:
     CEO Tim Cook has called this examination "fair," but insisted that Apple doesn't have any sort of monopoly, even though it bans iPhone and iPad developers from selling apps anywhere but the App Store.
    Wait, so app devs can't sell their apps on the Android Play store or other platforms? News to me.
    I found this odd too... 

    is it during those rimes when Apple signs an exclusivity agreement maybe?
    You and StrangeDays seem so confused about it all. Such a mystery why ANYONE could possible think Apple had a lock on approving and selling 3rd party apps to half the US smartphone installed base, and by far the most potentially profitable segment of US consumers.
    Oh look, the google guy is back with another false, FUD-dispensing narrative. Nope, not confused at all -- the reality is, there is no Apple monopoly, since by your own giddy hand you'd admit Apple has a minority market share to other platforms. Apple can't have a monopoly on their own store any more than McDonald's can a monopoly on their own store, menu, and available offerings to their customers. No taco trucks allowed inside McDonald's. And yes, android is a taco truck.

    The sentence, as written, is false. Apple doesn't ban devs from selling apps to other avenues other than App Store. There are indeed apps on iOS and the dumpster fire known as android. 
    edited June 5 toysandmelolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 31
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 7,953member

    flydog said:


    The company could come under pressure to drop any mandatory inclusion given antitrust scrutiny by the U.S. Justice Department. CEO Tim Cook has called this examination "fair," but insisted that Apple doesn't have any sort of monopoly, even though it bans iPhone and iPad developers from selling apps anywhere but the App Store.
    Apple does not ban developers from selling apps outside of the App Store.  The App Store is the only marketplace where a developer can sell iOS apps, but developers are free to sell apps on other platforms such as Android, and as web apps that may be used on any device. 
    Exactly my point. The phrasing is at odds with reality. (Not unusual for some of the haters here, either)
    lolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 31
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,154member
    Looks like Apple gains no monetary value from this.

    In that case, bravo Apple!

    There's a ton of things Apple gains no direct monetary value from, but the value of strengthening it's ecosystem and making it's products easier and more enjoyable to use, while protecting users, are very real. And this kind of thing fits squarely in that. 
    toysandmelolliverRayz2016watto_cobra
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