Tim Cook jumps to 69th spot on Glassdoor's list of top CEOs

Posted:
in General Discussion edited June 19
Apple chief Tim Cook on Tuesday was once again named to job website Glassdoor's list of the top 100 CEOs in America, marking his seventh consecutive appearance on the annual employee rankings chart.




Cook achieved an average 92% approval rating to take the No. 69 spot on Glassdoor's Employees' Choice Awards, up significantly from last year's 96th place finish. He was ranked 17th in Canada with a 94% approval in that country.

Cook's best result came in 2016 when the executive reached the No. 8 spot with a 96% approval rating.

As noted by CNET, Cook is among a total of 27 tech sector executives to make the top 100 CEOs list for the U.S. in 2019.

VMware's Pat Gelsinger took first position with an impressive 99% approval, while T-Mobile's John Legere, Adobe's Shantanu Narayen and Microsoft's Satya Nadella landed in the No. 4, No. 5 and No. 6 spots, respectively. Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, the only other tech executive aside from Cook to make the list since its inception, fell from No. 16 in 2018 to No. 55 this year.

Glassdoor forms its list by calculating results from anonymous employee reviews collected over the past year, according to a press release. More specifically, employees are asked whether they approve, disapprove or have no opinion about their CEO's performance.

The Employees' Choice Awards ranks 100 top CEOs in the U.S., 50 in the UK, 25 in Canada and 10 each for France and Germany.

Under Cook, Apple has become one of the world's most valuable companies, though much of its success is derived from a single product: iPhone. The executive is an outspoken proponent of human rights, often leveraging his station to forward not only business-related initiatives like consumer privacy, but also wedge issues like LGBT equality.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 4
    chasmchasm Posts: 1,649member
    It should be noted that, as the article infers, Cook is actually "tied" with 15 other CEOs with the same 92 percent approval rating. The first 45 CEOs (out of 100) on this list all have rankings of 95 percent or higher. This effectively renders the individual number rankings meaningless, though the list is still useful as a grouping of the best CEOs in the US.
    radarthekatFileMakerFeller
  • Reply 2 of 4
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,117moderator
    Tough to normalize these surveys as stock price and other issues come into play.  It’s hard to imagine a CEO actually wavers so drastically in his/her management and employee relationships as to make the swings in these surveys accurate.  And that should tell you a lot about any given ranking along the way.  

    I guess it’s like Buffett says, popularity contest in the short term (voting machine), weighing machine in the long term.  Better ways to measure the character of a person than anonymous surveys.  
    genovelleMenckeniana
  • Reply 3 of 4
    seanismorrisseanismorris Posts: 1,044member
    The main takeaway, this is Cook’s “seventh consecutive appearance on the annual employee rankings chart”.

    The yearly fluctuations are difficult to qualify, it could be stock price to his politics.  Bottom line, is he’s popular with employees...
    FileMakerFeller
  • Reply 4 of 4
    Tough to normalize these surveys as stock price and other issues come into play.  It’s hard to imagine a CEO actually wavers so drastically in his/her management and employee relationships as to make the swings in these surveys accurate.  And that should tell you a lot about any given ranking along the way.  

    I guess it’s like Buffett says, popularity contest in the short term (voting machine), weighing machine in the long term.  Better ways to measure the character of a person than anonymous surveys.  
    The swings in the survey aren't actually tied to the CEO's performance relative to the employee's assessment of the job they are doing.  The swings are entirely determined by by the score of the individual vs the score of the entire list.  Here's an easy example:
    Let's say a CEO is on the list for 10 consecutive years.  Each one of those years he has received the exact same score, a 95.  The CEO's ranking during that 10 year timeframe was 4th, 15th,  23rd, 8th, 33rd, 19th, 52nd, 6th, 40th, and in year 10 he was ranked 11th.  Even with the exact same 95 score, the giant swings still occurred because in each of those years the number of CEO's with better scores changed.  The first year 3 CEO's had a better score.  The second year 14 had a better score.  In the third year, 22, and so on for every year.

    Tim Cook received a 92 this year and ranked 69th.  Next year he could receive a 94 and still have a lower ranking than this year if 69 other CEO's have a higher score.

    There are no insights to be gained by trying to analyze the swings.  They are what they are.  Governed by 'relativity'.

    The only insight to take away from the survey is a group of 100 CEO's are, by and large, liked by their employees.  Any hot take beyond that is suspect.
    edited June 19 FileMakerFeller
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