T-Mobile launching 5G in six cities on June 28

Posted:
in iPhone edited June 25
T-Mobile will officially launch its mobile 5G network on Friday, June 28, beginning with in six U.S. cities with just one phone, the Samsung Galaxy S10 5G.

T-Mobile 5G in Dallas


The initial cities include Atlanta, Cleveland, Dallas, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, and New York City, T-Mobile said. The carrier's infrastructure includes the fastest 5G variant, millimeter wave, though maps confirm that only a handful of areas will be covered this month. In New York City for example 5G is limited to neighborhoods like the Lower East Side and downtown Brooklyn, completely excluding areas like Harlem and Queens.

The 6.7-inch S10 5G is perhaps Samsung's most expensive phone, costing $1,299 if bought outright.

T-Mobile used Tuesday's announcement to push for its proposed $26.5 billion merger with Sprint, arguing that combining its own 5G network with Sprint's mid-band spectrum would "deliver a broad and deep truly nationwide 5G network." It also reiterated a promise not to charge extra for 5G for at least three years.

The merger is facing opposition by 10 U.S. states, whose attorneys general recently filed suit to block the deal. The federal Justice Department is believed to be on the fence, allegedly asking for things like a spinoff carrier as a condition of approval.

Apple isn't expected to ship a 5G iPhone until 2020. That device could come in 5.4- and 6.7-inch sizes, relegating a 6.1-inch iPhone to 4G.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 16
    olsols Posts: 42member
    Having such patchy 5G coverage - I would not dare calling it a launch. So sad...
    JFC_PA
  • Reply 2 of 16
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,979member
    ols said:
    Having such patchy 5G coverage - I would not dare calling it a launch. So sad...
    Which is exactly why its not really a big deal to have a 5G iPhone at this point. Being first will really get you very little in the end. Wait until the market is ready and then release. 
    edited June 25
  • Reply 3 of 16
    It was the same thing when 4G launched. One of my coworkers was an Android fanboi and kept bragging about his amazing 4G phone and how fast everything was. I found out later that he had turned it off because coverage was extremely spotty and in 4G mode his battery didn't last an hour. All the premium cash he put down for his lousy Samsung got him a sh!tty phone and bragging rights. I'll wait for Apple's 5G iPhone thank you very much.
    SoundJudgmentracerhomie3
  • Reply 4 of 16
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,538unconfirmed, member
    macxpress said:
    ols said:
    Having such patchy 5G coverage - I would not dare calling it a launch. So sad...
    Which is exactly why its not really a big deal to have a 5G iPhone at this point. Being first will really get you very little in the end. Wait until the market is ready and then release. 

    It's just a bragging feature at the moment. Most people don't understand specs and companies like Samscum prey on the ignorance of the public.

    It was the same thing when 4G launched. One of my coworkers was an Android fanboi and kept bragging about his amazing 4G phone and how fast everything was. I found out later that he had turned it off because coverage was extremely spotty and in 4G mode his battery didn't last an hour. All the premium cash he put down for his lousy Samsung got him a sh!tty phone and bragging rights. I'll wait for Apple's 5G iPhone thank you very much.

    Every. fu**ing. year.

    Android manufacturers jump on the latest half-baked feature and spread misinformation in ads and their customers eat that crap up like sheep.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 5 of 16
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,318member
    Samsung Galaxy S10 5G FTW! Suck it iSheeple! /s No, really. /s
    racerhomie3AppleExposed
  • Reply 6 of 16
    racerhomie3racerhomie3 Posts: 1,160member
    Fix 4G LTE first. iPhones have plenty of LTE speeds left. Make 4G get better speeds, remove caps & improve coverage. 
    AppleExposed
  • Reply 7 of 16
    JFC_PAJFC_PA Posts: 358member
    ols said:
    Having such patchy 5G coverage - I would not dare calling it a launch. So sad...
    It’s a smart move. Do the soft rollout and identify the real world issues before potentially wasting billions in a flawed structural design. 

    And yeah: hardly a “launch” I completely agree. 

    But st least it’s not just inside “select stores”....
    edited June 25
  • Reply 8 of 16
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 5,152member
    It's coming...

    I just learned that Verizon bought all the telephone poles in my area from the local electric company.  There can be only one reason for that:   5G transmitters. It's looking like I'll have up to 3 within 100 feet of my house.

    I'm hoping Apple will catch up.  Dealing with crooked Qualcomm and then inept Intel really set them back.  Other manufacturers weren't so handicapped and are moving full steam ahead.   

    GiddyUp Apple!
  • Reply 9 of 16
    mobirdmobird Posts: 276member
    I don't have to wait, I have a iPhone X with AT&T service in the Memphis area and I am already getting 5GE. B)

    Yeah, I know it isn't 5GE...


    edited June 25 GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 10 of 16
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 1,674member
    mobird said:
    I don't have to wait, I have a iPhone X with AT&T service in the Memphis area and I am already getting 5GE. B)

    Yeah, I know it isn't 5GE...


    Lucky! I just have plain 4G LTE!  :'(

    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 11 of 16
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 1,674member
    It was the same thing when 4G launched. One of my coworkers was an Android fanboi and kept bragging about his amazing 4G phone and how fast everything was. I found out later that he had turned it off because coverage was extremely spotty and in 4G mode his battery didn't last an hour. All the premium cash he put down for his lousy Samsung got him a sh!tty phone and bragging rights. I'll wait for Apple's 5G iPhone thank you very much.
    This is exactly why you don't  want to be an early adopter and =one of the many reasons I'm totally unconcerned that Apple doesn't have a 5G phone yet.
    JFC_PA
  • Reply 12 of 16
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,492member
    I'm quite curious to see if 5G can be made for a home internet replacement. I'm not a big consumer of 4K movie downloads, so if the price was right for a stable, reliable connection, I might at least try it.
    edited June 26
  • Reply 13 of 16
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 5,152member
    eightzero said:
    I'm quite curious to see if 5G can be made for a home internet replacement. I'm not a big consumer of 4K movie downloads, so if the price was right for a stable, reliable connection, I might at least try it.
    All indications are that it can -- and will.  After all -- it will save the cable company from running lines into your house which saves them money.  (I already have three:   (copper telephone line, Comcast cable and Verizon FiOS - plus the electric lines).

    But, that may depend on existing infrastructure:  Where telephone poles serve a neighborhood they will have ready made towers for transmitter stations every 100 feet or so.  But, in the newer neighborhoods with underground wiring or in rural areas they may have to make do with longer wave variants that are slower but travel further.

    So, at least where millimeter wave are feasible, I can easily see bundles (like Comcast is already offering in 4G) of a combined mobile and home internet.  And, that might become even more important to them as a revenue driver as TV cable slowly dries up.

    But, at a minimum, I think it will ultimately provide competition to the traditional cable companies -- which will push prices down and performance up.  Those robbers have enjoyed a unregulated monopoly for far too long.
  • Reply 14 of 16
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 1,674member
    eightzero said:
    I'm quite curious to see if 5G can be made for a home internet replacement. I'm not a big consumer of 4K movie downloads, so if the price was right for a stable, reliable connection, I might at least try it.
    All indications are that it can -- and will.  After all -- it will save the cable company from running lines into your house which saves them money.  (I already have three:   (copper telephone line, Comcast cable and Verizon FiOS - plus the electric lines).

    But, that may depend on existing infrastructure:  Where telephone poles serve a neighborhood they will have ready made towers for transmitter stations every 100 feet or so.  But, in the newer neighborhoods with underground wiring or in rural areas they may have to make do with longer wave variants that are slower but travel further.

    So, at least where millimeter wave are feasible, I can easily see bundles (like Comcast is already offering in 4G) of a combined mobile and home internet.  And, that might become even more important to them as a revenue driver as TV cable slowly dries up.

    But, at a minimum, I think it will ultimately provide competition to the traditional cable companies -- which will push prices down and performance up.  Those robbers have enjoyed a unregulated monopoly for far too long.
    It certainly can, whether it will remains to be seen. To truly compete with cable, they need to have a significant density of transmitters in residential areas. The problem is that it the cost to put up the antennae vs the revenue generated isn't great and is highly dependent on the number of subscribers. On top of this, the market is already covered by the cable companies, so they would need to lure customers away. (Ok, I admit, that part probably won't be too hard!) I may have the economics all wrong on this. I completely agree with you that the cable companies need some competition. Hopefully they will.

    Speed is also a question - the theoretical speeds are fast, but with every mobile tech rollout we've seen in the past, the actual speeds are far lower that what is promised. Even now you never see speeds that approach the theoretical maximum of 4G LTE. 

    Another issue is that everything I've read about the high speed mm wave signal is that it is highly susceptible to interference. Even things like leaves and rain can apparently cause an issue. This means there's the potential for your broadband to go out during a rain storm, particularly if you're a bit further away from the antenna. I haven't seen any actual real world tests on this, this is just from the tech blogs, etc that I've read.
    edited June 26 GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 15 of 16
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 5,152member
    MplsP said:
    eightzero said:
    I'm quite curious to see if 5G can be made for a home internet replacement. I'm not a big consumer of 4K movie downloads, so if the price was right for a stable, reliable connection, I might at least try it.
    All indications are that it can -- and will.  After all -- it will save the cable company from running lines into your house which saves them money.  (I already have three:   (copper telephone line, Comcast cable and Verizon FiOS - plus the electric lines).

    But, that may depend on existing infrastructure:  Where telephone poles serve a neighborhood they will have ready made towers for transmitter stations every 100 feet or so.  But, in the newer neighborhoods with underground wiring or in rural areas they may have to make do with longer wave variants that are slower but travel further.

    So, at least where millimeter wave are feasible, I can easily see bundles (like Comcast is already offering in 4G) of a combined mobile and home internet.  And, that might become even more important to them as a revenue driver as TV cable slowly dries up.

    But, at a minimum, I think it will ultimately provide competition to the traditional cable companies -- which will push prices down and performance up.  Those robbers have enjoyed a unregulated monopoly for far too long.
    It certainly can, whether it will remains to be seen. To truly compete with cable, they need to have a significant density of transmitters in residential areas. The problem is that it the cost to put up the antennae vs the revenue generated isn't great and is highly dependent on the number of subscribers. On top of this, the market is already covered by the cable companies, so they would need to lure customers away. (Ok, I admit, that part probably won't be too hard!) I may have the economics all wrong on this. I completely agree with you that the cable companies need some competition. Hopefully they will.

    Speed is also a question - the theoretical speeds are fast, but with every mobile tech rollout we've seen in the past, the actual speeds are far lower that what is promised. Even now you never see speeds that approach the theoretical maximum of 4G LTE. 

    Another issue is that everything I've read about the high speed mm wave signal is that it is highly susceptible to interference. Even things like leaves and rain can apparently cause an issue. This means there's the potential for your broadband to go out during a rain storm, particularly if you're a bit further away from the antenna. I haven't seen any actual real world tests on this, this is just from the tech blogs, etc that I've read.
    Yeh, all good point...
    The one that concerns me the most though is competition between 5G providers:   Where only one provider serves a neighborhood and takes advantage of the monopoly (thus increasing prices) or all 4 (or soon 3?) want to service a neighborhood and there are 3,4 transmitters on every pole and thus increasing prices through the waste.

    It would make sense for the government to step in to insure that 5G is rolled out efficiently, quickly and effectively (including rural areas) but in today's political environment that will never happen.
  • Reply 16 of 16
    Aaron PaulAaron Paul Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    The 5G discussions are on the rise and Galaxy S10 5G sales going bizarre in South Korea, nothing is worth more than the much awaited technology and its usage. However, one thing that instantly comes to my mind is how are the apps going to be and how will the technology impact on app development, one thing that I am sure of that it\’s going to be amazing and the competition is going to be fierce than ever. I read this article on Branex,com How 5G will impact the mobile app development and gave me a little bit of the idea how the future tech is going to look when it is going to make its way to people. If you want to read the article too then you can follow the link: http://bit.ly/2Yipj3p
    GeorgeBMac
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