Apple CEO Tim Cook rips into 'absurd' Wall Street Journal report on Jony Ive's departure

135

Comments

  • Reply 41 of 89
    iOS_Guy80iOS_Guy80 Posts: 813member
    Which is why I never read WSJ.
    lkruppwatto_cobra
  • Reply 42 of 89
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,927member
    Poor Steve Jobs. Not only did he get shafted by plagiarists, twice.  It turns out he ‘Scullied’ Apple, twice.
    The supporting cast needs to be just that. When you hire a non-core product/service SME at the head of your organisation, it dies, again.
    I was hoping Apple had turned their Hero-culture into General-culture, that the dynamic duo of product manager/product designer in Jobs/Ive had been institutionalised but no.  Expect Mac/iPad/tv/watch & iOS licensing deals imminently.
    kestral
  • Reply 43 of 89
    ouraganouragan Posts: 437member
    After 30 years on the job, Jony Ive is entitled to retire without anyone drawing negative inferences.

    That being said, Apple has been plagued for more than 10 years by unreasonably high stock option bonuses paid to executives who, in turn, work for themselves like Angela Ahrends who showed no loyalty to anyone but herself and left Apple to its miseries after just 5 years on the job and a quarter billion dollars richer for her "efforts" and so-called "loyalty".

    In the case of Jony Ive, how could Jony have thought even for a moment that the lavish stock option bonuses were not a prelude to a higher position within Apple ? Hence, the dissatisfaction of Jony Ive and his eventual "retirement" once his stock options had vested.

    It's sad to say, but it's high time at Apple that customers and shareholders be shown some respect, not to mention the countless anonymous engineers and employees who make the day to day financial success of Apple.


    A word of advice to the Apple Board of directors and Tim: Just as you cannot buy your friends, you cannot buy the loyalty of executives in a company.
    edited July 2019 watto_cobra
  • Reply 44 of 89
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 3,430member
    WSJ and Bloomberg always seem to have an axe to grind with Apple. NYT too. One would think the NYC financial sector doesn’t like Apple for not playing their games and refusing to manage to the stock price... That management style, of maximizing stockholder value, is aka The Dumbest Idea In the World:


    You’re telling us that that’s NOT how Apple is run? Apple could’ve fooled me. Maybe it’s shades of gray; i.e.: today’s Apple maybe doesn’t play the Wall Street game as much as others, but it certainly seems to do it plenty in comparison to Apple prior to 2013.
    entropyscolinng
  • Reply 45 of 89
    matrix077matrix077 Posts: 868member
    WSJ and Bloomberg always seem to have an axe to grind with Apple. NYT too. One would think the NYC financial sector doesn’t like Apple for not playing their games and refusing to manage to the stock price... That management style, of maximizing stockholder value, is aka The Dumbest Idea In the World:


    I think it’s because Apple is big, different, and have massive cult-like fans that somehow they seem to loathe. 

    Forbes just published an article that said billion of iPhone were hacked less than a week ago, so anyone should trust these sources’ reports at their own peril. 
    edited July 2019 watto_cobra
  • Reply 46 of 89
    JinTech said:
    Good on Cook for setting the record straight!
    Respectfully, Tim did not set the record straight. He said the story was wrong but did not refute specific claims, so I would say he is taking a stand against purportedly false reporting. Setting the record straight involves providing facts, which are absent in this case thus far.
    colinngkestralAI_lias
  • Reply 47 of 89
    matrix077matrix077 Posts: 868member
    elijahg said:
    Well he's not exactly going to admit something like that is he..?
    This story concerns more than Tim Cook himself, you know? It concerns everyone of ID teams which quite a few had been out of Apple lately and can speak freely. Cook is too smart to lie on this. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 48 of 89
    matrix077matrix077 Posts: 868member
    paxman said:
    As the CEO TC had to respond and deny, or at least play it down, but I have to say I find the WSJ story entirely plausible. That is exactly how it happens when someone in a key role burns out. Maybe even JI would deny that he in fact burned out, but will come around to this fact (if it is so), further down the line. If it is he should probably have handed over the reins a long time ago but that is not an easy thing to do. I am sure there was a lot of pressure on his to stay. The WSJ suggests as much with all the special allowances made for JI by TC. To me it has felt like the design path forged by JI had run its course. He was all about beautiful minimalism and it must be tedious to keep slogging down the same road with the same products. It would be almost unthinkable that he would break the mold and add some corners and trinkets and bling just for the sake of changing up the looks. A new design team might do something like that. The current 'look and feel' of the Apple Watch, iPhone and iPads, macBooks and iMacs really carry the 'Designed by Jony' stamp. Perhaps in 5 years none of the will. Maybe the era of Apple 'bling' is due? I hope not but who knows?
    I think not many people have issue with some of the incidents reported but the interpretation, and the melo-dramatisation of it that we object. 
    edited July 2019 watto_cobra
  • Reply 49 of 89
    matrix077matrix077 Posts: 868member
    saronian said:
    Marc Newson, also leaving Apple, seems to add credence to the WSJ story.
    Mark Newson was never an Apple employee. 

    Damn, I have read a lot of dumb comments about this story lately. 
    edited July 2019 AppleExposedwelshdogwatto_cobra
  • Reply 50 of 89
    matrix077matrix077 Posts: 868member
    JinTech said:
    Good on Cook for setting the record straight!
    Respectfully, Tim did not set the record straight. He said the story was wrong but did not refute specific claims, so I would say he is taking a stand against purportedly false reporting. Setting the record straight involves providing facts, which are absent in this case thus far.
    LOL. Clinging on it all you want. It will only tire you.
    edited July 2019 watto_cobra
  • Reply 51 of 89
    matrix077matrix077 Posts: 868member
    lkrupp said:
    WSJ and Bloomberg always seem to have an axe to grind with Apple. NYT too. One would think the NYC financial sector doesn’t like Apple for not playing their games and refusing to manage to the stock price... That management style, of maximizing stockholder value, is aka The Dumbest Idea In the World:


    Well, AAPL was up +3.63 today, close to 3%. One would think these two would get a clue that their attempts at “managing” the stock isn’t working. No?
    Yeah, I noticed that. That would hurt the reporter ego. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 52 of 89
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 4,297member
    matrix077 said:
    elijahg said:
    Well he's not exactly going to admit something like that is he..?
    This story concerns more than Tim Cook himself, you know? It concerns everyone of ID teams which quite a few had been out of Apple lately and can speak freely. Cook is too smart to lie on this. 
    What’s absurd is people thinking Tim Cook would send a journalist an email full of lies. 
    matrix077AppleExposedcanukstormmuthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 53 of 89
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 4,297member
    JinTech said:
    Good on Cook for setting the record straight!
    Respectfully, Tim did not set the record straight. He said the story was wrong but did not refute specific claims, so I would say he is taking a stand against purportedly false reporting. Setting the record straight involves providing facts, which are absent in this case thus far.

    Tim Cook said the story was absurd. Of course he’s not going to refute every allegation in the story. I would hope to god he’s got more important things to do. The fact he responded at all when Apple rarely if ever responds to gossip says a lot.
    muthuk_vanalingamWgkruegerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 54 of 89
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,805unconfirmed, member
    matrix077 said:
    WSJ and Bloomberg always seem to have an axe to grind with Apple. NYT too. One would think the NYC financial sector doesn’t like Apple for not playing their games and refusing to manage to the stock price... That management style, of maximizing stockholder value, is aka The Dumbest Idea In the World:


    I think it’s because Apple is big, different, and have massive cult-like fans that somehow they seem to loathe. 

    Forbes just published an article that said billion of iPhone were hacked less than a week ago, so anyone should trust these sources’ reports at their own peril. 

    That article was hilarious. It stretches the truth so far to fit their agenda. That writer has a knack for stretching stories to the point he's just making crap up.

    matrix077watto_cobra
  • Reply 55 of 89
    kevin keekevin kee Posts: 1,289member
    Tim Cook is not in habit of refuting anything. The fact that he did means he is upset enough to do so. The fact that he is upset enough means the journalist has gone too far and potentially hurt someone. The fact that he didn't explain every little things tell you that he doesn't need to make the story bigger than necessary and that it's none of everyone's else business but his own company.

    The least we can do is respect.
    edited July 2019 muthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 56 of 89
    knowitallknowitall Posts: 1,648member
    ktappe said:
    georgie01 said:
    Yes, because the major news outlets never run news that is deliberately misleading or absurdly biased...
    Painting all media outlets with one brush is rather misleading as well. 
    I don't think it is, everyone has an agenda, especially news agencies and should be judged accordingly.
    You can never accept news at face value, that would be irresponsible. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 57 of 89
    9secondkox29secondkox2 Posts: 2,699member
    So... Tim does damage control. 

    Jony is crickets...

    thats notable. 

    I expect jony will say something to soothe it over in irder in order to become a classy guy. 

    But this His isn’t the first time this kind of sentiment has come out. 

    Steve set it up it to where Ive could retire at Apple no matter what. Apple IS battleship Ive. Steve Jobs was the captain who gave navigable input. 

    Tim doesn’t know what to do with Ive. He’s a supply chain guy - and make no mistake, that’s what Apple needs as its ceo these days. But he’s not a design visionary. And likely in reality, he doesn’t excitedly attend design team meetings very much. 

    That said, I bet he does from now on. So this is a win
    edited July 2019
  • Reply 58 of 89
    aknabiaknabi Posts: 211member
    JinTech said:
    Good on Cook for setting the record straight!
    Or spinning... we'll see in the end (hopefully sooner rather than later)... just because you don't like the news doesn't mean it's "fake".
  • Reply 59 of 89
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 6,417member
    ...lots of speculation...  Is a trusted foil of critical opinion difficult to quantify or understand ? Also I can't imagine the psychic (human) sense of loss and emotions to carry on given the passing of SJ...  Batman and Robin comes to mind (silly I know) and yet...?

    Unfortunately from this customer's perspective I've had mixed feelings about the macs I've bought since the 2011 mini that had discrete graphics, 2 standard drive bays, 2 standard ram slots and multiple ports... At the time almost everything about it was an true 'upgrade' - It just worked (and still does :)  although even that design had me disappointed in the lack of a Kensington lock slot. Was this the new Apple?  Would that have been so difficult to add somewhere ?  Aftermarket locking options were a pain in the behind.  This customer would find a lock slot most useful even today...

    Indeed I have bought newer mac hardware hoping to 'upgrade', but in the end very regrettably sent it back. The ultimate irony being the only display I could not get working with a loaded 2016 macbook pro was an Apple 27" Cinema Display, despite multiple Apple sales/support opinions that the TB2>TB3 adapter should work. It seemed absurdly illogical. Really? I must buy a new monitor to use with a MBP ?  Who decided to not support the TB3 standard for mDP ?  Intuition in design in my experience is a funny thing, and some people just have it - can one can be excellent at creative thinking or form making, and yet there remains the question of macro judgement ?   Here's to the future and some structural changes, and I hope we are all pleasantly surprised by good things and 'magic' for all ahead...
    Maybe because the Cinema Display doesn’t use Thunderbolt. I use both my 30” Cinema Displays with my 2018 MBP via a $15 miniDP to USB-C adapter. You seem very confused. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 60 of 89
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 6,417member
    matrix077 said:
    saronian said:
    Marc Newson, also leaving Apple, seems to add credence to the WSJ story.
    Mark Newson was never an Apple employee. 

    Damn, I have read a lot of dumb comments about this story lately. 
    Me too, yours now included.

    https://appleinsider.com/articles/14/09/05/apple-hires-designer-marc-newson-will-assist-jony-ive-on-
Sign In or Register to comment.