Sales of iPhones down year-on-year despite popularity of iPhone XR in US

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 96
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,915member
    larrystar said:
    That notch, the camera bump, and the price!! That’s the reason for the decline and if these renderings of what the next iPhone will look like with that square thing in the back of the phone for the camera it’s horrible looking I’m a big Apple fan but I have to admit these Samsung phones are beautiful maybe it’s best that Johnny Ives is no longer with Apple.
    Nope. No one cares about notches and (yawn, years later) camera bumps. We do care about good photos and bigger screens in the same size. 
    edited July 2019
  • Reply 42 of 96
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,915member
    avon b7 said:
    mubaili said:
    Apple must not talk itself into believing that it cannot gain more market share. It must act aggressively, speed up the cycle, and push more variety of devices, i.e., do what they have done to the iPad line up to the iPhone line up. 
    The problem is price, plain and simple. In 2016 the flagship iPhone started at $649. One year later the flagship model was $999. Even the Xr which is supposed to be the more affordable model starts at $749, $100 more than the flagship from 2 years prior. It doesn’t matter if the tech inside the phone or the materials it’s made with are more advanced/expensive to manufacture. At the end of the day the average selling price of the iPhone has steadily been going up. And consumers are starting to say no thanks, I’ll keep what I’ve got it’s good enough.

    With the X I think Apple was testing how much of a price increase the market would bear (and the higher ASP would allow them to show revenue growth even when sales were flat to down). I think they got their answer. I’d be surprised if there are any price cuts this year and I’ll bet the XS gets removed from the lineup. But I don’t think we’ll see any price increases or storage configurations that push up the price. And I’ll bet we see Apple aggressively pushing trade-ins again.

    The problem with this statement is that the iPhone X sold really well.
    This affirmation is actually questionable for various reasons.

    Apple never revealed any numbers beyond saying it was the most popular iPhone. It's all relative if the less popular iPhones weren't far behind iPhone X but didn't of course reach 'most popular' status. So, I think Apple made that claim for two or maybe three quarters and for the last quarter they said nothing.
    I think they reported it longer than that. And yes it does matter because it means price wasn’t the main factor to Apple consumers. Maybe to you knockoffs, but not to people wanting the best. 

    Nice fantasy narrative about “But maybe it was just barely the best seller!” Funny, since you were just making a fuss on another thread about people making conclusions without evidence. And here you are. Not surprised. 
    edited July 2019 AppleExposedpscooter63
  • Reply 43 of 96
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,952member
    I'm holding out for a new SE... just saying.

    That said, my SE seems to be doing just fine for now. So, I'm not in any hurry.
    designrlkruppAppleExposed
  • Reply 44 of 96
    macplusplusmacplusplus Posts: 2,114member

    gilly33 said:
    lkrupp said:
    mubaili said:
    Apple must not talk itself into believing that it cannot gain more market share. It must act aggressively, speed up the cycle, and push more variety of devices, i.e., do what they have done to the iPad line up to the iPhone line up. 
    Blah, blah, blah, yada, yada, yada. The Macintosh has never had more than a 10% share of the worldwide market and it has been a success for Apple all these years. Discerning customers see the value and TCO of Apple products and are very willing to pay the mythical Apple Tax. When has Apple EVER had a dominating share of ANY market? They have literally created or boosted markets out of thin air (personal computers, portable music players, smartphones, tablets, smartwatches, etc) only to see them dominated by cheap knock-offs and lookalikes. Through it all Apple has remained true to its mission statement to provide well designed, reliable, usable products that customers like to use. Again, tech blog forums like AI are filled with comments from a market segment that doesn’t value design, only cares about specs, and wants everything cheap.
    Well said lkrupp. Appreciate your insight as always. It’s the same stuff every year Android phones is outselling Apple. Apple is losing market share. Apple remains focused on the core mission. Mistakes made yes but mission focused. 
    Except the core mission now seems to be extracting more money out of existing customers since hardware growth is stagnant. Which might be one reason why Jony Ive thought now was a good time to leave. The Apple of the future seems to be how can we get someone to spend $10 a month on x service.
    This is very emotional. As a profit oriented entity Apple of course will strive to sell more to its customers. Apple makes a difference by not strangling its customer to squeeze money but by offering choices. With the price of an XS, one may get one past model iPhone and an iPad. That is choice, not squeezing money. There is no “not selling” product in Apple’s current range, all its products justified themselves with varying degrees of sales. That means primarily Apple offers the right choices.
    AppleExposeddedgecko
  • Reply 45 of 96
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,952member
    rogifan_new said:
    Except the core mission now seems to be extracting more money out of existing customers since hardware growth is stagnant. Which might be one reason why Jony Ive thought now was a good time to leave. The Apple of the future seems to be how can we get someone to spend $10 a month on x service.
    This is very emotional. As a profit oriented entity Apple of course will strive to sell more to its customers.
    Yes, but is is about what they are selling and what their motivations are. I'd rather have them selling me cutting edge hardware and software than services, as their motives tend to impact the end products. For example, if they make $50 on an iPhone, that's a lot different then them making $50 by trying to sell me an podcast (Apple Music) subscription, which might negatively impact the podcasting space.... or selling me some extra cloud backup space which might impact how much storage they include in their hardware and for what prices, etc.

    Or, for example, this is what sets Apple apart from Google, Facebook, etc. How and why companies are making the money (yes, they all want to make money) dramatically impacts the offerings, or even how those companies use the offerings. It isn't neutral.
    elijahg
  • Reply 46 of 96
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,747member
    avon b7 said:
    mubaili said:
    Apple must not talk itself into believing that it cannot gain more market share. It must act aggressively, speed up the cycle, and push more variety of devices, i.e., do what they have done to the iPad line up to the iPhone line up. 
    The problem is price, plain and simple. In 2016 the flagship iPhone started at $649. One year later the flagship model was $999. Even the Xr which is supposed to be the more affordable model starts at $749, $100 more than the flagship from 2 years prior. It doesn’t matter if the tech inside the phone or the materials it’s made with are more advanced/expensive to manufacture. At the end of the day the average selling price of the iPhone has steadily been going up. And consumers are starting to say no thanks, I’ll keep what I’ve got it’s good enough.

    With the X I think Apple was testing how much of a price increase the market would bear (and the higher ASP would allow them to show revenue growth even when sales were flat to down). I think they got their answer. I’d be surprised if there are any price cuts this year and I’ll bet the XS gets removed from the lineup. But I don’t think we’ll see any price increases or storage configurations that push up the price. And I’ll bet we see Apple aggressively pushing trade-ins again.

    The problem with this statement is that the iPhone X sold really well.
    This affirmation is actually questionable for various reasons.

    Apple never revealed any numbers beyond saying it was the most popular iPhone. It's all relative if the less popular iPhones weren't far behind iPhone X but didn't of course reach 'most popular' status. So, I think Apple made that claim for two or maybe three quarters and for the last quarter they said nothing.
    I think they reported it longer than that. And yes it does matter because it means price wasn’t the main factor to Apple consumers. Maybe to you knockoffs, but not to people wanting the best. 

    Nice fantasy narrative about “But maybe it was just barely the best seller!” Funny, since you were just making a fuss on another thread about people making conclusions without evidence. And here you are. Not surprised. 
    You can't say 'it means price wasn't the main factor'. We don't know.

    However, I described a reasonable situation that could mean price was a factor and it makes some sense.

    In simplistic terms, the higher you go on price, the smaller the pool of potential buyers.

    If your first $1,000+ phone ran out of steam in the fourth quarter and your seasonal blowout first quarter resulted in a profit warning, what happened to those people for whom price isn't a factor? One possible conclusion is that many of them were using iPhone X and not willing to upgrade one year on. However, if price wasn't a factor, there should have been another wave of buyers to keep the wheel turning. Complicating matters was the perceived across the board price increases of the three new phones and their specs (among other issues)

    Furthermore, the discounts arrived before Christmas and were placed on Apple's front page with the entire focus being on - price.

    That says a lot.

    If it weren't for those offers my wife wouldn't have the Xr she currently has. We had actually ruled it out as not being worthy of the price tag and used the money we'd set aside for something else. It was only when the last minute promotion came through that we decided to get one.


    muthuk_vanalingamelijahg
  • Reply 47 of 96
    macplusplusmacplusplus Posts: 2,114member
    cgWerks said:
    rogifan_new said:
    Except the core mission now seems to be extracting more money out of existing customers since hardware growth is stagnant. Which might be one reason why Jony Ive thought now was a good time to leave. The Apple of the future seems to be how can we get someone to spend $10 a month on x service.
    This is very emotional. As a profit oriented entity Apple of course will strive to sell more to its customers.
    Yes, but is is about what they are selling and what their motivations are. I'd rather have them selling me cutting edge hardware and software than services, as their motives tend to impact the end products. For example, if they make $50 on an iPhone, that's a lot different then them making $50 by trying to sell me an podcast (Apple Music) subscription, which might negatively impact the podcasting space.... or selling me some extra cloud backup space which might impact how much storage they include in their hardware and for what prices, etc.

    Or, for example, this is what sets Apple apart from Google, Facebook, etc. How and why companies are making the money (yes, they all want to make money) dramatically impacts the offerings, or even how those companies use the offerings. It isn't neutral.
    Cloud computing is their strategic move, as announced by Steve Jobs. So how would they port you to cloud computing without selling iCloud space to you? This has nothing to do with hardware options. One is strategic, OS-wise, the other is ephemeral, depending on current market conditions. If you claim that their motivation behind cloud computing is to sell you less capable thus more expensive hardware then you should try harder to override your signal to noise ratio. 
  • Reply 48 of 96
    badmonkbadmonk Posts: 1,304member
    larrystar said:
    That notch, the camera bump, and the price!! That’s the reason for the decline and if these renderings of what the next iPhone will look like with that square thing in the back of the phone for the camera it’s horrible looking I’m a big Apple fan but I have to admit these Samsung phones are beautiful maybe it’s best that Johnny Ives is no longer with Apple.
    Nope. No one cares about notches and (yawn, years later) camera bumps. We do care about good photos and bigger screens in the same size. 
    and let me add that the notch houses FaceID which in combination with Keychain is absolutely amazing.  I don’t understand the whole “hardware has plateaued” meme...my iPhone X is the best iPhone i have ever owned since my OG model from 2007. I think Apple is guilty of under promoting the technical advance of FaceID which is stunning. My X is the first phone that I have thought about holding onto longer than 3 years (which is part of the problem for Apple).
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 49 of 96
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 10,557member
    larrystar said:
    That notch, the camera bump, and the price!! That’s the reason for the decline and if these renderings of what the next iPhone will look like with that square thing in the back of the phone for the camera it’s horrible looking I’m a big Apple fan but I have to admit these Samsung phones are beautiful maybe it’s best that Johnny Ives is no longer with Apple.
    You can’t even spell Jony Ive and we’re supposed to believe you’re a big Apple fan? Baloney. 
    edited July 2019 AppleExposedgilly33StrangeDayspscooter63
  • Reply 50 of 96
    henrybayhenrybay Posts: 144member
    iPhone 8 is still the second best seller. A lot of people obviously love their home button. Apple, please take note of this clear market signal and keep a home button on at least one of the upcoming new iPhones. Call me old fashioned but I love my home button. 
    cgWerksapplesnoranges
  • Reply 51 of 96
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,952member
    macplusplus said:
    Cloud computing is their strategic move, as announced by Steve Jobs. So how would they port you to cloud computing without selling iCloud space to you? This has nothing to do with hardware options. One is strategic, OS-wise, the other is ephemeral, depending on current market conditions. If you claim that their motivation behind cloud computing is to sell you less capable thus more expensive hardware then you should try harder to override your signal to noise ratio. 
    I'm not necessarily against cloud computing, especially stuff like SaaS or cloud backup, servers, etc. But, I'm against moving to services as a too big a part of their income/importance, as that will be detrimental to our interests as customers.

    Or, maybe to put it a bit differently, I'm kind of OK with it as an accessory. I just don't want it to become a major driver.
    elijahg
  • Reply 52 of 96
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,952member
    henrybay said:
    iPhone 8 is still the second best seller. A lot of people obviously love their home button. Apple, please take note of this clear market signal and keep a home button on at least one of the upcoming new iPhones. Call me old fashioned but I love my home button. 
    Same here. As long as I have the choice, I'd MUCH rather have the home button and Touch ID than notch and Face ID.
    elijahghenrybay
  • Reply 53 of 96
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,805unconfirmed, member
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    mubaili said:
    Apple must not talk itself into believing that it cannot gain more market share. It must act aggressively, speed up the cycle, and push more variety of devices, i.e., do what they have done to the iPad line up to the iPhone line up. 
    The problem is price, plain and simple. In 2016 the flagship iPhone started at $649. One year later the flagship model was $999. Even the Xr which is supposed to be the more affordable model starts at $749, $100 more than the flagship from 2 years prior. It doesn’t matter if the tech inside the phone or the materials it’s made with are more advanced/expensive to manufacture. At the end of the day the average selling price of the iPhone has steadily been going up. And consumers are starting to say no thanks, I’ll keep what I’ve got it’s good enough.

    With the X I think Apple was testing how much of a price increase the market would bear (and the higher ASP would allow them to show revenue growth even when sales were flat to down). I think they got their answer. I’d be surprised if there are any price cuts this year and I’ll bet the XS gets removed from the lineup. But I don’t think we’ll see any price increases or storage configurations that push up the price. And I’ll bet we see Apple aggressively pushing trade-ins again.

    The problem with this statement is that the iPhone X sold really well.
    This affirmation is actually questionable for various reasons.

    Apple never revealed any numbers beyond saying it was the most popular iPhone. It's all relative if the less popular iPhones weren't far behind iPhone X but didn't of course reach 'most popular' status. So, I think Apple made that claim for two or maybe three quarters and for the last quarter they said nothing.

    That ties in with some analysts reporting at the time that iPhone X sales had dropped off faster than any other new release before it.

    It was retired in the 2018 refresh and the first quarter of that cycle Apple issued a profit warning.

    While we will probably never know all of what happened, it is very reasonable to speculate that the iPhone pool of purchasers simply ran out of 'financial steam' and sales dropped as a result. 

    Tim Cook said it sold well.

    Your theories are irrelevant.
    My theories are no more or no less relevant than yours.

    Tim Cook saying it 'sold well'  doesn't say much. If you only release three phones a year (or only two, prior to the X) but ship over 200 million handsets, it likely that sold well could be applied to all of them.

    What the OP was referencing was that overall, prices for new releases had gone up. As a result people bought those new releases in smaller numbers.

    What I was referencing was an extension to that logic. That, at any given time, there are only so many people who can reach those high prices. Some of them probably bought the iPhone X and most of those left the group of potential buyers as a result. Others may have been able to afford one but didn't see enough value in the Xr, Xs lines so opted out.

    It's possible that when the 2018 refresh occurred (with those prices) there were simply far fewer takers.

    At first Apple upped the promotion of financing deals on top of the regular upgrade/trade in offers.

    As they went 'all hands' just before Christmas, they went one step further and introduced new trade in deals with bigger discounts and put them on the front page of the Apple websites. Originally they were called 'limited time' promotions. The last time I checked, they were still on the front page.

    That tells us a lot about expectations and sales even in the absence of official numbers.

    And if you want to quote Tim Cook, remember it was him who said Apple had miscalculated.

    IMO, they miscalculated on various aspects and price was just one of them



    I didn't post a theory....
  • Reply 54 of 96
    macplusplusmacplusplus Posts: 2,114member
    cgWerks said:
    macplusplus said:
    Cloud computing is their strategic move, as announced by Steve Jobs. So how would they port you to cloud computing without selling iCloud space to you? This has nothing to do with hardware options. One is strategic, OS-wise, the other is ephemeral, depending on current market conditions. If you claim that their motivation behind cloud computing is to sell you less capable thus more expensive hardware then you should try harder to override your signal to noise ratio. 
    I'm not necessarily against cloud computing, especially stuff like SaaS or cloud backup, servers, etc. But, I'm against moving to services as a too big a part of their income/importance, as that will be detrimental to our interests as customers.

    Or, maybe to put it a bit differently, I'm kind of OK with it as an accessory. I just don't want it to become a major driver.
    That will never happen. This is told since many years, some click-freak blog writers suggested even Apple should shut down the Mac ! Services are nothing more than an attraction for more hardware sales. They are providing services since Steve Jobs, take iTunes. All mainstream services have begun under Steve Jobs’ leadership. Those never made Apple a primarily services company and never will. Some services have failed, however, like Ping. The rest succeeded. Apple’s big expertise is in hardware production in scale. Services are just an extra bonus of that expertise. And I’m also sure that with their newly announced services like TV+ and Apple Arcade, Apple will deliver also in scale because their hardware are so successful.
    edited July 2019 AppleExposed
  • Reply 55 of 96
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,805unconfirmed, member
    designr said:
    avon b7 said:
    mubaili said:
    Apple must not talk itself into believing that it cannot gain more market share. It must act aggressively, speed up the cycle, and push more variety of devices, i.e., do what they have done to the iPad line up to the iPhone line up. 
    The problem is price, plain and simple. In 2016 the flagship iPhone started at $649. One year later the flagship model was $999. Even the Xr which is supposed to be the more affordable model starts at $749, $100 more than the flagship from 2 years prior. It doesn’t matter if the tech inside the phone or the materials it’s made with are more advanced/expensive to manufacture. At the end of the day the average selling price of the iPhone has steadily been going up. And consumers are starting to say no thanks, I’ll keep what I’ve got it’s good enough.

    With the X I think Apple was testing how much of a price increase the market would bear (and the higher ASP would allow them to show revenue growth even when sales were flat to down). I think they got their answer. I’d be surprised if there are any price cuts this year and I’ll bet the XS gets removed from the lineup. But I don’t think we’ll see any price increases or storage configurations that push up the price. And I’ll bet we see Apple aggressively pushing trade-ins again.

    The problem with this statement is that the iPhone X sold really well.
    This affirmation is actually questionable for various reasons.

    Apple never revealed any numbers beyond saying it was the most popular iPhone. It's all relative if the less popular iPhones weren't far behind iPhone X but didn't of course reach 'most popular' status. So, I think Apple made that claim for two or maybe three quarters and for the last quarter they said nothing.

    That ties in with some analysts reporting at the time that iPhone X sales had dropped off faster than any other new release before it.

    It was retired in the 2018 refresh and the first quarter of that cycle Apple issued a profit warning.

    While we will probably never know all of what happened, it is very reasonable to speculate that the iPhone pool of purchasers simply ran out of 'financial steam' and sales dropped as a result. 

    Tim Cook said it sold well.

    Your theories are irrelevant.
    Sadly "well" is not an objective measure we can use to compare to say, "good" or "okay" or "great".


    Someone didn't hear the quarterly financial statement...

    "Well" is MY term that I used. It sold "very good" if that makes any difference.

    Apple had raised their expectations beyond the sky hoping it would outsell iPhone 6 but it was short of that expectation but still sold "very good". Tim Cook compared it to your favorite team winning the SuperBowl but not by a lot of points. I believe it was the 2nd highest selling iPhone ever.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 56 of 96
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,805unconfirmed, member
    lkrupp said:
    larrystar said:
    That notch, the camera bump, and the price!! That’s the reason for the decline and if these renderings of what the next iPhone will look like with that square thing in the back of the phone for the camera it’s horrible looking I’m a big Apple fan but I have to admit these Samsung phones are beautiful maybe it’s best that Johnny Ives is no longer with Apple.
    You can’t even spell Jony Ive and we’re supposed to believe you’re a big Apple fan? Baloney. 

    And I'm sure he's also owned every Apple product since the 70s and is finally switching to Windows/Android....
    StrangeDayspscooter63
  • Reply 57 of 96
    dedgeckodedgecko Posts: 169member
    designr said:
    avon b7 said:
    mubaili said:
    Apple must not talk itself into believing that it cannot gain more market share. It must act aggressively, speed up the cycle, and push more variety of devices, i.e., do what they have done to the iPad line up to the iPhone line up. 
    The problem is price, plain and simple. In 2016 the flagship iPhone started at $649. One year later the flagship model was $999. Even the Xr which is supposed to be the more affordable model starts at $749, $100 more than the flagship from 2 years prior. It doesn’t matter if the tech inside the phone or the materials it’s made with are more advanced/expensive to manufacture. At the end of the day the average selling price of the iPhone has steadily been going up. And consumers are starting to say no thanks, I’ll keep what I’ve got it’s good enough.

    With the X I think Apple was testing how much of a price increase the market would bear (and the higher ASP would allow them to show revenue growth even when sales were flat to down). I think they got their answer. I’d be surprised if there are any price cuts this year and I’ll bet the XS gets removed from the lineup. But I don’t think we’ll see any price increases or storage configurations that push up the price. And I’ll bet we see Apple aggressively pushing trade-ins again.

    The problem with this statement is that the iPhone X sold really well.
    This affirmation is actually questionable for various reasons.

    Apple never revealed any numbers beyond saying it was the most popular iPhone. It's all relative if the less popular iPhones weren't far behind iPhone X but didn't of course reach 'most popular' status. So, I think Apple made that claim for two or maybe three quarters and for the last quarter they said nothing.

    That ties in with some analysts reporting at the time that iPhone X sales had dropped off faster than any other new release before it.

    It was retired in the 2018 refresh and the first quarter of that cycle Apple issued a profit warning.

    While we will probably never know all of what happened, it is very reasonable to speculate that the iPhone pool of purchasers simply ran out of 'financial steam' and sales dropped as a result. 

    Tim Cook said it sold well.

    Your theories are irrelevant.
    Sadly "well" is not an objective measure we can use to compare to say, "good" or "okay" or "great".

    Apple has moved on from hardware sales. Either adjust to the new metrics or GTFO.

    It’s about user base.  It has been since day one. Hardware sales was originally an indicator of this, but it hasn’t been for a few years as the premium market of phones has been established, and geometric growth is no longer possible.  It’s about Apple ID’s that are happy and spending money in the ecosystem.  Some may jump ship while others will spawn new Apple ID’s who will be plugged in from birth. 
  • Reply 58 of 96
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,805unconfirmed, member
    designr said:
    designr said:
    avon b7 said:
    mubaili said:
    Apple must not talk itself into believing that it cannot gain more market share. It must act aggressively, speed up the cycle, and push more variety of devices, i.e., do what they have done to the iPad line up to the iPhone line up. 
    The problem is price, plain and simple. In 2016 the flagship iPhone started at $649. One year later the flagship model was $999. Even the Xr which is supposed to be the more affordable model starts at $749, $100 more than the flagship from 2 years prior. It doesn’t matter if the tech inside the phone or the materials it’s made with are more advanced/expensive to manufacture. At the end of the day the average selling price of the iPhone has steadily been going up. And consumers are starting to say no thanks, I’ll keep what I’ve got it’s good enough.

    With the X I think Apple was testing how much of a price increase the market would bear (and the higher ASP would allow them to show revenue growth even when sales were flat to down). I think they got their answer. I’d be surprised if there are any price cuts this year and I’ll bet the XS gets removed from the lineup. But I don’t think we’ll see any price increases or storage configurations that push up the price. And I’ll bet we see Apple aggressively pushing trade-ins again.

    The problem with this statement is that the iPhone X sold really well.
    This affirmation is actually questionable for various reasons.

    Apple never revealed any numbers beyond saying it was the most popular iPhone. It's all relative if the less popular iPhones weren't far behind iPhone X but didn't of course reach 'most popular' status. So, I think Apple made that claim for two or maybe three quarters and for the last quarter they said nothing.

    That ties in with some analysts reporting at the time that iPhone X sales had dropped off faster than any other new release before it.

    It was retired in the 2018 refresh and the first quarter of that cycle Apple issued a profit warning.

    While we will probably never know all of what happened, it is very reasonable to speculate that the iPhone pool of purchasers simply ran out of 'financial steam' and sales dropped as a result. 

    Tim Cook said it sold well.

    Your theories are irrelevant.
    Sadly "well" is not an objective measure we can use to compare to say, "good" or "okay" or "great".


    Someone didn't hear the quarterly financial statement...

    "Well" is MY term that I used. It sold "very good" if that makes any difference.

    Apple had raised their expectations beyond the sky hoping it would outsell iPhone 6 but it was short of that expectation but still sold "very good". Tim Cook compared it to your favorite team winning the SuperBowl but not by a lot of points. I believe it was the 2nd highest selling iPhone ever.

     :D 

    "well" "very good" "not by a lot of points"

    Nice.

    OK we get it. Tim Cook was lying as usual....
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 59 of 96
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,915member
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    mubaili said:
    Apple must not talk itself into believing that it cannot gain more market share. It must act aggressively, speed up the cycle, and push more variety of devices, i.e., do what they have done to the iPad line up to the iPhone line up. 
    The problem is price, plain and simple. In 2016 the flagship iPhone started at $649. One year later the flagship model was $999. Even the Xr which is supposed to be the more affordable model starts at $749, $100 more than the flagship from 2 years prior. It doesn’t matter if the tech inside the phone or the materials it’s made with are more advanced/expensive to manufacture. At the end of the day the average selling price of the iPhone has steadily been going up. And consumers are starting to say no thanks, I’ll keep what I’ve got it’s good enough.

    With the X I think Apple was testing how much of a price increase the market would bear (and the higher ASP would allow them to show revenue growth even when sales were flat to down). I think they got their answer. I’d be surprised if there are any price cuts this year and I’ll bet the XS gets removed from the lineup. But I don’t think we’ll see any price increases or storage configurations that push up the price. And I’ll bet we see Apple aggressively pushing trade-ins again.

    The problem with this statement is that the iPhone X sold really well.
    This affirmation is actually questionable for various reasons.

    Apple never revealed any numbers beyond saying it was the most popular iPhone. It's all relative if the less popular iPhones weren't far behind iPhone X but didn't of course reach 'most popular' status. So, I think Apple made that claim for two or maybe three quarters and for the last quarter they said nothing.
    I think they reported it longer than that. And yes it does matter because it means price wasn’t the main factor to Apple consumers. Maybe to you knockoffs, but not to people wanting the best. 

    Nice fantasy narrative about “But maybe it was just barely the best seller!” Funny, since you were just making a fuss on another thread about people making conclusions without evidence. And here you are. Not surprised. 
    You can't say 'it means price wasn't the main factor'. We don't know.
    We absolutely can. The data supports that conclusion and that conclusion alone (the more-expensive X sold more than cheaper iphones, therefore price wasn’t the defining characteristic). Everything else is made up phooey on your part. Your ice cream come is melting, son. Sorry about reality and all. 
    edited July 2019
  • Reply 60 of 96
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,915member

    henrybay said:
    iPhone 8 is still the second best seller. A lot of people obviously love their home button. Apple, please take note of this clear market signal and keep a home button on at least one of the upcoming new iPhones. Call me old fashioned but I love my home button. 
    O rly? The X sold more than the 8. Second best out of two is a pointless distinction. Your point is utterly fruitless. 
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