Intel sold smartphone modem business to Apple because only serving Apple was unattractive

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 25
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,805unconfirmed, member
    Ask any damn Apple supplier how important thsi ONE customer is. Apple is providing 50% or more revenue to their affiliates. Ask Corning or Foxconn if they would like to do business with Apple.

    Sorry Bob Swan, Apple was not the problem, Intel was. Had Intel supplied superior modems on time they could have had an exclusive deal with Apple and raked in billions. Intel had no idea what to do with their modems or how to move forward, Apple on the other hand knows how. An easy sale for confused Intel and a good deal for Apple.

    Bob you'll be crying when you see what Apple does with your tech. When Apple rakes in billions implementing their modems in iPhone/iPad/Mac/Watch/Car/future products.
  • Reply 22 of 25
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 22,907member
    Ask any damn Apple supplier how important thsi ONE customer is. Apple is providing 50% or more revenue to their affiliates. Ask Corning or Foxconn if they would like to do business with Apple.

    Sorry Bob Swan, Apple was not the problem, Intel was. Had Intel supplied superior modems on time they could have had an exclusive deal with Apple and raked in billions. Intel had no idea what to do with their modems or how to move forward, Apple on the other hand knows how. An easy sale for confused Intel and a good deal for Apple.

    Bob you'll be crying when you see what Apple does with your tech. When Apple rakes in billions implementing their modems in iPhone/iPad/Mac/Watch/Car/future products.
    Foxconn has already stated they're working to be less dependent on Apple's business. Surely you've seen the stories here about suppliers who tied their fortunes to Apple only to fail hard when Apple decides to go in a different direction and no longer feels they require Supplier A.
  • Reply 23 of 25
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,310member
    spice-boy said:
    What happened to Apple's philosophy of only acquiring small companies? This is big corporate merger crap other companies do to squash competition in an industry. 
    No, it isn’t. 
  • Reply 24 of 25
    Ask any damn Apple supplier how important thsi ONE customer is. Apple is providing 50% or more revenue to their affiliates. Ask Corning or Foxconn if they would like to do business with Apple.

    Sorry Bob Swan, Apple was not the problem, Intel was. Had Intel supplied superior modems on time they could have had an exclusive deal with Apple and raked in billions. Intel had no idea what to do with their modems or how to move forward, Apple on the other hand knows how. An easy sale for confused Intel and a good deal for Apple.

    Bob you'll be crying when you see what Apple does with your tech. When Apple rakes in billions implementing their modems in iPhone/iPad/Mac/Watch/Car/future products.
    Intel was never going to rake in billions from a single customer and they most assuredly weren't going to rake in billions from Apple.  Remember, Intel modems were always an interim step -a stopgap- between Qualcomm modems and Apple's in-house modem. Intel modems were never a long term proposition for Apple.  The only hope - which was really no hope at all - Intel had was to get additional customers so they could mitigate their costs through volume.  No one was going to buy Intel over the established players.  

    We still don't know the viability of Intel's modem tech.  It could be the launch pad for Apple to blast off with their modems.  It also could be as bad as GT Advance's sapphire furnaces.  So we should probably pump the brakes on the Intel schadenfreude until it's realized what Apple's billion dollars actually bought.  
  • Reply 25 of 25
    LordeHawkLordeHawk Posts: 168member
    reroll said:
    Wondering about what this last comment will concretely lead to: move processing from clouds to the networks. I think I understand the idea, I’m not sure what they can achieve that isn’t already possible with the cloud.
    I deal with the cloud a lot in my line of work,  or maybe it’s better to say multilayer network architectures.   Today’s networks are primarily centralized and not very edge agile.  Running networks as edge specific across a resilient cloud infrastructure, allows massive gains in network latency and bandwidth.

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