Apple pulls second iOS 13.2 beta for some iPad Pro models

Posted:
in iOS
Apple has withdrawn the second developer build of iPadOS 13.2 from download for some models of iPad Pro, after reports surfaced where testers effectively bricked their mobile devices and needed to perform a full restore of the operating system.




Apple released the second build of iPadOS 13.2 and iOS 13.2 on Thursday to participants of its developer beta testing program. The build was also accompanied by the second beta of tvOS 13.2 and third build of watchOS 6.1.

Following the seeding of the iOS and iPadOS builds, reports from users started to appear on the Apple Developer Forum, with users being offered messages saying they were no longer connected to the Internet during the installation process, while others saw the message "Unable to Verify Update."

In some cases, users were unable to actually use the iPad Pro, prompting a hard reset, which didn't work. In such cases, a restore of the operating system to an earlier build or the public release rectified the issue.

The reports seem to indicate only the 2018 iPad Pro releases are affected by the issues. Other models of iPad Pro, iPad, and iPhones running iOS 13.2 beta 2 are seemingly unaffected. Apple has since blocked access to the build for the relevant iPad Pro models.

The second build of iOS 13.2 introduces new emoji to the mobile operating system, an option to opt-in to Siri improvements by sending audio recordings, and changes to how video settings function in the camera, among other alterations.

AppleInsider, and Apple itself, strongly recommend users don't install the betas on primary devices or hardware they deem as "mission critical" at all, as there is the highly remote possibility of data loss or other issues. Testers should instead install betas onto secondary or non-essential devices as a safer alternative, and to always make sure there are sufficient backups of important data before updating.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 20
    The reports seem to indicate only the 2018 iPad Pro releases are affected by the issues.
    Unfortunately, I have 13.2 on my 2018 iPad Pro which is my test development device - no problems so far, but I will say head need to roll at Apple about iOS 13's readiness for deployment. From a developer perspective there are multiple bugs - the UISearchController component, a critical feature of many apps, was rewritten and has major bugs still in formatting. The seriously need to do maintenance releases for iOS14 and iOS15 to restore confidence.
  • Reply 2 of 20
    Oops

    Fortunately people that test betas are very familiar with wiping and reloading their devices.
    uraharacaladaniandewme
  • Reply 3 of 20
    On my iPad pro 2018, 12.9 inch, iTunes crashes frequently when playing music (downloaded or online Apple Music), and when trying to scroll long playlists...
    I run IpadOS 13.1.2.
    Other apps ‘freeze’ frequently when in use such as : Safari, Files (iCloud), and Photos...
    Apple has some fixing to do, however I cannot understand while ‘normal’ apps such as iTunes are not fully tested to handle simple tasks as playing music and scrolling in long playlists...
    It just (don’t) work!

    2old4fun
  • Reply 4 of 20
    uraharaurahara Posts: 585member
    On my iPad pro 2018, 12.9 inch, iTunes crashes frequently when playing music (downloaded or online Apple Music), and when trying to scroll long playlists...
    I run IpadOS 13.1.2.
    Other apps ‘freeze’ frequently when in use such as : Safari, Files (iCloud), and Photos...
    Apple has some fixing to do, however I cannot understand while ‘normal’ apps such as iTunes are not fully tested to handle simple tasks as playing music and scrolling in long playlists...
    It just (don’t) work!

    (doesn’t)*
    Iscaladanian
  • Reply 5 of 20
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,035member
    I’ve had some problems using 13.2 on my iPad Pro 12.9” 2018 model. That’s expected—it’s a beta! But I had no problem downloading and installing it. I’m using it now, posting this.
    dewmeDontmentionthewar
  • Reply 6 of 20
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 9,233member
    Oops

    Fortunately people that test betas are very familiar with wiping and reloading their devices.
    They should be, but I think that there are a lot of people downloading the betas just because they can, and then some of them complain about it later if some problem or issue arises.

    That's the whole point of a beta, and those people are test rabbits.

    I'm patient, I can wait for the final release to come out. Thanks to those beta testers who are willing to test things out, but I do not feel sorry for them at all if things don't go as planned.
    edited October 2019 dewme
  • Reply 7 of 20
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,030member
    I'm confused by this. I thought all iPads were now on a forked PadOS as of version 13. Is the iPad Pro really still on iOS 13.x?
  • Reply 8 of 20
    Soli said:
    I'm confused by this. I thought all iPads were now on a forked PadOS as of version 13. Is the iPad Pro really still on iOS 13.x?
    No, it's a mistake.
  • Reply 9 of 20
    IsIs Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    Let’s talk about 13.1.2 on iPad Pro 1st gen, eats ram, freezes apps, drops network connections, keyboard does not pop up, fonts are missing out of apps and games. The only answer is too reboot and wait for it to happen again. I’ve reset network settings, reset all settings, next is flash the software from a desktop with iTunes which Apple is outmoding soon. It’s that or wait for a fix.
    dewme
  • Reply 10 of 20
    Is said:
    Let’s talk about 13.1.2 on iPad Pro 1st gen, eats ram, freezes apps, drops network connections, keyboard does not pop up, fonts are missing out of apps and games. The only answer is too reboot and wait for it to happen again. I’ve reset network settings, reset all settings, next is flash the software from a desktop with iTunes which Apple is outmoding soon. It’s that or wait for a fix.
    In Catalina, you just manage the iPad from the Finder instead of Music. Otherwise it's largely the same.
    tallgrasstechie
  • Reply 11 of 20
    Leroy_MelbLeroy_Melb Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    13.1.2 is one of the worst production releases around. I suffered frequent Apple Music stalls and freezing, podcasts unusable, serious battery drain and associated heat (lost 50% in 30 mins) and general freezing across apps including settings. Also associated impact on watch battery life (series 5 out of battery by 3pm). Only way to fix is a reboot (temporary) - went to apple store they wanted me to restore to factory and set up as new. Decided to install 13.2 Beta 2 and back to normal with no stalls/freezes and battery life on iPhone 11 pro and watch series 5 very good. 13.1.2 = bad release.
    Dontmentionthewar
  • Reply 12 of 20
    mattinozmattinoz Posts: 1,636member
    Have people been fired for this release cycle yet?
    i regret letting my AppleTV update good thing I stopped updates on other devices. 
  • Reply 13 of 20
    dewmedewme Posts: 3,827member
    mattinoz said:
    Have people been fired for this release cycle yet?
    i regret letting my AppleTV update good thing I stopped updates on other devices. 
    If any software company (including Apple) fired every developer, tester, manager, executive, marketing employee, etc., who ever made a mistake in specification, coding, testing, customer promising, cost estimating, decision making - whatever, we'd still be using an abacus to balance our tiny little checking accounts. Employees make mistakes all of the time because they are human. The better employees learn from their mistakes and their employer and customers are better off as a result of the forced learning experience. As many others have noted, installing Beta software is exactly the same as volunteering for a major butt-hurt experience. If you are fortunate enough to avoid the expected butt-hurt you are doing pretty darn good and should consider yourself lucky. At some point your luck will run out, but that's what the free ticket on the Beta roller coaster ride entitled you to experience when you sign up. Keep your hands inside the ride at all times.
    fastasleep
  • Reply 14 of 20
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,035member
    A lot of bugs is the result of the forced one year cycle that most every manufacturer has to deliver on these days. Way back, before cellphones, and before more “modern” computers, there was no real release schedule. Companies came out with OS upgrades whenever they thought it was ready.

    then Microsoft came out with their service packs, and the Mac was upgraded every two years. Those things set the idea of scheduled releases. That meant that some bugs were inevitable.

    with the first cellphones, there were no OS upgrades, because everything was so simple, basically just phone calls. The first generation of smartphones also had no OS upgrade schedules. I had a color Palm PDA for about three years. The OS was 3.5. Then, for $99, they came out with OS 4, which I bought for it. When I bought the Samsung i300 smartphone almost 3 years later, which was a color Palmphone with Graffiti, it had Palm OS 3.51. almost a year later I got the newer i330, because the screen was bad, and it also had 3.51. Then a couple of years later, I bought the Palm Treo 700p, and guess what? It also had 3.51! A bit later we got 3.52 and 3.53 to fix bugs. But in the three years I had that phone, it was still on 3.53. figure out how many years that OS was used. Most other were around almost as long. Nobody would stand for that today.

    so, while Apple fixed that no upgrade path most had, they did cause the buggy release cycle that they and Google have. Both Apple and Microsoft have buggy computer release schedules as well. If you think it’s bad for the Mac, it’s ten times worse for Windows! I can link to articles about the Windows upgrade disaster.

    so, with OSs gettin bigger and more complex, and a fixed release schedule, prepare yourselves for buggy releases. Unless companies can be convinced to relax these schedules, it just going to keep happening. A problem is that it’s been shown in studies that most people would rather have bugs than not have a continuous stream of new hardware and software features. So unless that attitude changes, bugs it is.
  • Reply 15 of 20
    mattinozmattinoz Posts: 1,636member
    dewme said:
    mattinoz said:
    Have people been fired for this release cycle yet?
    i regret letting my AppleTV update good thing I stopped updates on other devices. 
    If any software company (including Apple) fired every developer, tester, manager, executive, marketing employee, etc., who ever made a mistake in specification, coding, testing, customer promising, cost estimating, decision making - whatever, we'd still be using an abacus to balance our tiny little checking accounts. Employees make mistakes all of the time because they are human. The better employees learn from their mistakes and their employer and customers are better off as a result of the forced learning experience. As many others have noted, installing Beta software is exactly the same as volunteering for a major butt-hurt experience. If you are fortunate enough to avoid the expected butt-hurt you are doing pretty darn good and should consider yourself lucky. At some point your luck will run out, but that's what the free ticket on the Beta roller coaster ride entitled you to experience when you sign up. Keep your hands inside the ride at all times.
    Except this isn’t beta software. I’m well aware of the beta risk, I’ve done it for pro and os software before. 
    We are talking release software with serious obvious bugs. Someone had a go/no-go call on these releases and didn’t Hit the no go button. So not everyone but someone. Or someones. Who ever it is who made the call that made everyone’s work look bad. 

    They have  more distinct sub OS these days they could have spaced them out to buy quality control more time more sensible pace to keep on top of these things. 
  • Reply 16 of 20
    dewmedewme Posts: 3,827member
    mattinoz said:
    dewme said:
    mattinoz said:
    Have people been fired for this release cycle yet?
    i regret letting my AppleTV update good thing I stopped updates on other devices. 
    If any software company (including Apple) fired every developer, tester, manager, executive, marketing employee, etc., who ever made a mistake in specification, coding, testing, customer promising, cost estimating, decision making - whatever, we'd still be using an abacus to balance our tiny little checking accounts. Employees make mistakes all of the time because they are human. The better employees learn from their mistakes and their employer and customers are better off as a result of the forced learning experience. As many others have noted, installing Beta software is exactly the same as volunteering for a major butt-hurt experience. If you are fortunate enough to avoid the expected butt-hurt you are doing pretty darn good and should consider yourself lucky. At some point your luck will run out, but that's what the free ticket on the Beta roller coaster ride entitled you to experience when you sign up. Keep your hands inside the ride at all times.
    Except this isn’t beta software. I’m well aware of the beta risk, I’ve done it for pro and os software before. 
    We are talking release software with serious obvious bugs. Someone had a go/no-go call on these releases and didn’t Hit the no go button. So not everyone but someone. Or someones. Who ever it is who made the call that made everyone’s work look bad. 

    They have  more distinct sub OS these days they could have spaced them out to buy quality control more time more sensible pace to keep on top of these things. 
    Yeah, I should have separated the two points: 1) people make mistakes (whether in beta products or not), and 2) the topic of this article is about a beta release which is fodder for crash test dummies. 
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 17 of 20
    melgross said:
    A lot of bugs is the result of the forced one year cycle that most every manufacturer has to deliver on these days. Way back, before cellphones, and before more “modern” computers, there was no real release schedule. Companies came out with OS upgrades whenever they thought it was ready.
    As a developer from way back in the Stone Age, before cell phones and "modern" computers, I can assure you that there were, in fact, release schedules.  Regular ones.  And just like now, sometimes crap was released before it was ready, resulting in the bug-fix scramble. 
    Solifastasleep
  • Reply 18 of 20
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,035member
    melgross said:
    A lot of bugs is the result of the forced one year cycle that most every manufacturer has to deliver on these days. Way back, before cellphones, and before more “modern” computers, there was no real release schedule. Companies came out with OS upgrades whenever they thought it was ready.
    As a developer from way back in the Stone Age, before cell phones and "modern" computers, I can assure you that there were, in fact, release schedules.  Regular ones.  And just like now, sometimes crap was released before it was ready, resulting in the bug-fix scramble. 
    Not like today there weren’t.
  • Reply 19 of 20
    I had the issue described.  When I first installed 13.2 Beta 2, the update cycle took much longer than previous installs and hung in the process.  I did a hard reset after 2 hours and got the same result.  I ended up restoring to 13.1.2 and then installed 13.2 Beta 2 again.  The install process completed correctly this time.
  • Reply 20 of 20
    melgross said:
    melgross said:
    A lot of bugs is the result of the forced one year cycle that most every manufacturer has to deliver on these days. Way back, before cellphones, and before more “modern” computers, there was no real release schedule. Companies came out with OS upgrades whenever they thought it was ready.
    As a developer from way back in the Stone Age, before cell phones and "modern" computers, I can assure you that there were, in fact, release schedules.  Regular ones.  And just like now, sometimes crap was released before it was ready, resulting in the bug-fix scramble. 
    Not like today there weren’t.
    Yes, exactly like today.  In fact, today's release schedules are a lot more flexible and subject to change than they were back then, what with the trend towards so-called "agile" methodologies.  
    Solifastasleep
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