Netgear expands Orbi family with Orbi Mesh WiFi system

Posted:
in General Discussion
Netgear expands its Orbi line with new dual-band Mesh WiFi system, designed to provide reliable and customizable Wi-Fi coverage to large homes.

Orbi Mesh WiFi


The new Orbi Dual-Band Mesh WiFi System consists of one router and two satellites. The system is designed to provide reliable WiFi for streaming and gaming to homes that are 3,000 square feet or larger.

Orbi Dual-Band Mesh WiFi System utilizes a single WiFi network name, which eliminates disconnecting and allows for continuous streaming while moving throughout the home. The system can deliver combined speeds of up to 1.2 gigabits per second. The Orbi's sleek, modern design blends subtly within a home's decor. Slip a satellite into a bookshelf, counter, or entertainment center and provide WiFi to areas that previously had poor WiFi coverage.

Setup is easy and can be done within a few minutes from any iOS or Android mobile device. Orbi can be controlled with Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant to provide voice control for frequently used features, such as turning on or off guest WiFi.

The Orbi system comes with Netgear's Armor, a multi-layered cybersecurity designed to protect all your devices. It consists of anti-virus, anti-malware, and data protection for an unlimited number of features.

The system also includes Circle, Netgear's parental control solution. Users can set filters and assign them to individual users' profiles, with additional functionality giving parents the ability to customize settings for various apps, websites, ad blocking, and enabling safe search as a default.

The Orbi Mesh WiFi System includes one 1.2 gigabit per second router with two satellites for $229.99, and will soon be available to purchase from Staples.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    Curious how this system compares to Eero, which we invested in thanks to tech bloggers raving about it, but has been spotty in practice. Missing our Time Capsule, which produced a solid, stable WiFi signal.
    jkdstevewatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 12
    Does this system support  IEEE 802.11ax aka Wi-Fi 6?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 12
    The thing I like about Apple's Time Capsule is that the 2.4 and 5 GHz networks are as if combined into one. Every other wifi router I've tried keeps them separate. With the TC, I'm able to have my Epson printer and other 2.4 GHz devices not slow down my iPads and iPhones which are on the 5 GHz network, but I can still connect to those devices without having to reconnect onto the 2.4 GHz network. I'm still using the TC, but the new house I now in has thick, stone walls so the TC is sitting in the hallway. Not ideal but the only thing that works. I'd like to get a mesh WiFi network but I have a question. Do these mesh WiFi work like the TC does and allows me to have one account name for all devices (2.4 and 5 Ghz), yet keeping them on their own network? Or do you have to connect to the 2.4 GHz version of the network to do something like printing? Thanks.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 12
    igroucho said:
    Does this system support  IEEE 802.11ax aka Wi-Fi 6?
    No it does not. They are taking preorders for their WiFi 6 Orbi though, to the tune of $700US 

    https://www.netgear.com/orbi/rbk852.aspx
    igrouchowatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 12
    SamWebb said:
    The thing I like about Apple's Time Capsule is that the 2.4 and 5 GHz networks are as if combined into one. Every other wifi router I've tried keeps them separate. With the TC, I'm able to have my Epson printer and other 2.4 GHz devices not slow down my iPads and iPhones which are on the 5 GHz network, but I can still connect to those devices without having to reconnect onto the 2.4 GHz network. I'm still using the TC, but the new house I now in has thick, stone walls so the TC is sitting in the hallway. Not ideal but the only thing that works. I'd like to get a mesh WiFi network but I have a question. Do these mesh WiFi work like the TC does and allows me to have one account name for all devices (2.4 and 5 Ghz), yet keeping them on their own network? Or do you have to connect to the 2.4 GHz version of the network to do something like printing? Thanks.
    I use the Orbi modem/router combo and it uses one network ID and password. It uses software to determine best band for the device...ie smart home devices have no issues on 2.4 GHz while keeping my idevices on 5 GHz...all with same credentials. 
    SamWebbwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 12
    Appleish said:
    Curious how this system compares to Eero, which we invested in thanks to tech bloggers raving about it, but has been spotty in practice. Missing our Time Capsule, which produced a solid, stable WiFi signal.
    It’s pretty stable but can be better. My issues with it are that it needs to be restarted fairly regularly (every couple months) as if there’s a build up in the cache. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 12
    rgh71rgh71 Posts: 119member
    I have the older Orby system, and it’s been working great. Besides the form factor, I’m wondering if this new system has any speed advantages over the old one?
    watto_cobraforgot username
  • Reply 8 of 12
    wozwozwozwoz Posts: 252member
    Sounds like a radiation nightmare - guaranteed to radiate your home. Why would anyone install such a thing in their home when they can buy some nice highspeed ethernet cable that will not radiate their kids?
  • Reply 9 of 12
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,990member
    SamWebb said:
    The thing I like about Apple's Time Capsule is that the 2.4 and 5 GHz networks are as if combined into one. Every other wifi router I've tried keeps them separate. 
    This can be a good or not so good thing depending on perspective. Apple did that to provide max throughput when close and range when not and that works well for most users.

    But if you want to keep your Internet of Things separate from your computer network as a precaution against hack attacks then a more traditional router is needed. Some people want to protect their computer network so the latter route(r) is preferred. This means for printers and smart door lock you have to jump back and fourth between networks. Inconvenient but more secure. I'm not at all well versed in IOT but I'd guess encryption of various Things is sparse of not missing.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 12
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,990member
    wozwoz said:
    Sounds like a radiation nightmare - guaranteed to radiate your home. Why would anyone install such a thing in their home when they can buy some nice highspeed ethernet cable that will not radiate their kids?
    That post is sheer dumbassery cubed, from the first word to the last.
    mike1roundaboutnowwatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 12
    mike1mike1 Posts: 2,598member
    wozwoz said:
    Sounds like a radiation nightmare - guaranteed to radiate your home. Why would anyone install such a thing in their home when they can buy some nice highspeed ethernet cable that will not radiate their kids?
    I was looking for the head slap emoji.
    roundaboutnowwatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 12
    So, what is the difference between this, and the immediately preceeding Orbi system?
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