100% of Fortune 500 companies are using Apple products

Posted:
in General Discussion edited November 2019
During the annual Jamf Nation User Conference, Apple's Jeremy Butcher took the stage to talk on Apple's commitment to education and enterprise users, boasting large gains in both programs.

Apple's Jeremy Butcher takes the stage at JNUC 2019
Apple's Jeremy Butcher takes the stage at JNUC 2019


Butcher shared a progress report on its enterprise success, including that 100 percent of Fortune 500 companies are using Apple products. Also in 2019 are hundreds of different organizations that have over 10,000 Apple devices deployed.

100% of Fortune 500 companies use Apple
100% of Fortune 500 companies use Apple


To run those organizations, Apple launched its Business Manager program in 2018 following the launch of Apple School Manager in 2016 that bring together all the different management components into a single experience.

Butcher touted that Apple now has more than 150,000 customers across 69 countries utilizing Apple's Business Manager and School Manager.

There are 150K customers across 69 countries using Apple Business Manager and Apple School Manager
There are 150K customers across 69 countries using Apple Business Manager and Apple School Manager


Apple's success is reinforced by recent studies that show 59 percent of higher education students choose a Mac, and three out of four employees choose Apple when given a choice.

For these large organizations, Butcher says Apple focuses on four main pillars -- security, management and deployment, identity, and productivity.

"Our intent is to make products that are secure by default," says Butcher. This means making it secure out of the gate, and not something that can be disabled. For identity, Apple wants to sit at the crossroads of security for the users' personal information, while still making it easy to manage and deploy those devices. With productivity, Apple's simple goal is to make its devices "more powerful with Apple's legendary ease of use."

Butcher also spent some time talking about Apple's recent enterprise features and consumer features, such as enhancements to single sign-on, device enrollment, and iPadOS.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 20
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,380member
     but ...but dentists still use Windows 7. ;)

    Fabulous news  ... as is AAPL ... just approaching $267!
    edited November 2019 lostkiwiwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 20
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,030member
    MacPro said:
     but ...but dentists still use Windows 7. ;)

    Fabulous news  ... as is AAPL ... just approaching $267!
    The title and article don't say much. Using Apple products in 100% of companies simply means that they either issue or allow iPhones and iPads for at least one employee. Chances are they are using Windows, Linux, and Unix servers, Windows for most of their traditional PCs, and then support iPhone and Android, and probably some iPads for various executive needs or particular employees that use it as an appliance. I'd be surprised if this stat hasn't been the case for a decade.
    edited November 2019 muthuk_vanalingamCloudTalkinchemengin1philboogie
  • Reply 3 of 20
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    bigtds said:
    Yeah, and rain is wet. How is this news? I bet 100% of fortune 500 companies use Microsoft, Dell, HP...etc.
    Yeah one computer in advertising doesn’t mean the rest of the organization is on board.  
    muthuk_vanalingamchemengin1philboogie
  • Reply 4 of 20
    I suppose if one person in each of the 500 companies has an iPhone, then this could be said, too!
  • Reply 5 of 20
    This is a weird article. I was trying to imagine what it would mean for a fortune 500 company to _not_ use any Apple products. It's hard to even imagine. If iOS has, let's say, 13% marketshare, that's one in every 8 people who are using an iPhone. What are the chances that clustered in a fortune 500 company are hundreds, if not thousands, of people, and none of them is using an iPhone. 
    edited November 2019 chemengin1
  • Reply 6 of 20
    I worked at a Fortune 500 company for years, they had Macs but were not allowed on their employee network. To request a Mac can take months to receive one.
    Having said that, Amazon supports Macs 100%, no performance or access limitations. Very refreshing! ;)
    watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 7 of 20
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    I would love to see Apple get back into education in a meaningful way.  I don’t mean expensive Macs or iPads running apps.  Rather I’d like to see a solution that targets technical education sort of like the way Raspberry PI does. 

    In other words a small single board computer that supports I/O, monitor and keyboard / mouse.  Imagine a slightly beefed up AppleTV for about $175.  That would include a case, power supply and a bunch of other “extras” a base Raspberry PI does offer.    Should be an easy do for Apple and everything but the monitor means easy management for schools.  
    CloudTalkinwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 20
    dewmedewme Posts: 3,816member
    wizard69 said:
    I would love to see Apple get back into education in a meaningful way.  I don’t mean expensive Macs or iPads running apps.  Rather I’d like to see a solution that targets technical education sort of like the way Raspberry PI does. 

    In other words a small single board computer that supports I/O, monitor and keyboard / mouse.  Imagine a slightly beefed up AppleTV for about $175.  That would include a case, power supply and a bunch of other “extras” a base Raspberry PI does offer.    Should be an easy do for Apple and everything but the monitor means easy management for schools.  
    Yes! I could not agree more. And make sure it allows an iPad to be used as both a monitor and keyboard.

    As nice as Swift Playgrounds is as an entry point into programming, there’s a lot more excitement to be had when you give kids or learners of any age a way to make physical things happen or animate under software control. They don’t even have to go head to head against existing programs like LEGO Mindstorms or First Robotics Competition, which are industrial arts focused. Maybe Apple can find ways to bring other liberal arts disciplines into the software integration mix. Not quite sure about what or how, but there’s a lot of creative talent in Apple and the liberal arts world to infuse new ideas. It doesn’t always have to be about robotics, manufacturing, or automation. 
    edited November 2019 applesnoranges
  • Reply 9 of 20
    dewme said:
    wizard69 said:
    I would love to see Apple get back into education in a meaningful way.  I don’t mean expensive Macs or iPads running apps.  Rather I’d like to see a solution that targets technical education sort of like the way Raspberry PI does. 

    In other words a small single board computer that supports I/O, monitor and keyboard / mouse.  Imagine a slightly beefed up AppleTV for about $175.  That would include a case, power supply and a bunch of other “extras” a base Raspberry PI does offer.    Should be an easy do for Apple and everything but the monitor means easy management for schools.  
    Yes! I could not agree more. And make sure it allows an iPad to be used as both a monitor and keyboard.

    As nice as Swift Playgrounds is as an entry point into programming, there’s a lot more excitement to be had when you give kids or learners of any age a way to make physical things happen or animate under software control. They don’t even have to go head to head against existing programs like LEGO Mindstorms or First Robotics Competition, which are industrial arts focused. Maybe Apple can find ways to bring other liberal arts disciplines into the software integration mix. Not quite sure about what or how, but there’s a lot of creative talent in Apple and the liberal arts world to infuse new ideas. It doesn’t always have to be about robotics, manufacturing, or automation. 
    I don't get it. Why can't you do this with a Mac mini or an iPad even now?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 20
    dewme said:
    wizard69 said:
    I would love to see Apple get back into education in a meaningful way.  I don’t mean expensive Macs or iPads running apps.  Rather I’d like to see a solution that targets technical education sort of like the way Raspberry PI does. 

    In other words a small single board computer that supports I/O, monitor and keyboard / mouse.  Imagine a slightly beefed up AppleTV for about $175.  That would include a case, power supply and a bunch of other “extras” a base Raspberry PI does offer.    Should be an easy do for Apple and everything but the monitor means easy management for schools.  
    Yes! I could not agree more. And make sure it allows an iPad to be used as both a monitor and keyboard.

    As nice as Swift Playgrounds is as an entry point into programming, there’s a lot more excitement to be had when you give kids or learners of any age a way to make physical things happen or animate under software control. They don’t even have to go head to head against existing programs like LEGO Mindstorms or First Robotics Competition, which are industrial arts focused. Maybe Apple can find ways to bring other liberal arts disciplines into the software integration mix. Not quite sure about what or how, but there’s a lot of creative talent in Apple and the liberal arts world to infuse new ideas. It doesn’t always have to be about robotics, manufacturing, or automation. 
    I don't get it. Why can't you do this with a Mac mini or an iPad even now?

    Apple's strategy lately has been to deliver 'appliance-like' devices, not user-serviceable. Even their new Mac Pro, which is positioned as being user-serviceable, still requires special "expansion modules" to be installed to get the most benefit.

    Far from a Raspberry Pi that starts out as a user-serviceable board.

    I don't see Apple going down this path at all. They are far too entrenched in their self-contained, consumer-focused, app-focused, service-focused path. Hardware is just the enabler. They are doing great things with hardware, but the finished product is very much an enclosed device designed to be replaced (by Apple) the following year (or six).


  • Reply 11 of 20
    DRBDRB Posts: 34member
    Soli said:
    MacPro said:
     but ...but dentists still use Windows 7. ;)

    Fabulous news  ... as is AAPL ... just approaching $267!
    The title and article don't say much. Using Apple products in 100% of companies simply means that they either issue or allow iPhones and iPads for at least one employee. Chances are they are using Windows, Linux, and Unix servers, Windows for most of their traditional PCs, and then support iPhone and Android, and probably some iPads for various executive needs or particular employees that use it as an appliance. I'd be surprised if this stat hasn't been the case for a decade.
    Apple doesn't go after the Server Market. They are going after the desktop/laptop, tablet and smartphone market. That's their sweetspot. It's still a pretty impressive change from 5 to 10 years ago and with IBM, they've gone from 0 to 200,000 Macs deployed at IBM Global. 200,000 Macs out of 500,000 computer is about 40%. Now, if ever company used 40% Macs vs PCs and that same percentage was the same amongst the consumer base, Apple would be leaps and bounds the largest personal computer mfg. in the world. But more and consumers and companies are leveraging smartphones or an iPad as for some employees, that's all they really need to perform their job.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 20
    DRBDRB Posts: 34member
    greg uvan said:
    This is a weird article. I was trying to imagine what it would mean for a fortune 500 company to _not_ use any Apple products. It's hard to even imagine. If iOS has, let's say, 13% marketshare, that's one in every 8 people who are using an iPhone. What are the chances that clustered in a fortune 500 company are hundreds, if not thousands, of people, and none of them is using an iPhone. 
    Corporations are typically run differently than the average consumer. These Fortune 500 corporations typically have plenty of money to spend on IT for their employees. if you look at the majority of the consumer base, they can't afford that much, which is why the majority of Android phones sold are the cheap ones in the $200 or less category. Plus, Corporations tend to like using what works better for their environment. IBM has done several presentations over the years regarding their transition to Apple products and whether it's the laptop side or the mobile device side, Apple has lots of advantages over Windows or Android. It's still refreshing that Apple has finally cracked into the Fortune 500 market and once they are in at this level, it's hard to get them out, especially when these companies are saving money or getting higher productivity out of their employees.
    lostkiwiapplesnorangeswatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 20
    DRBDRB Posts: 34member
    ITGUYINSD said:
    I suppose if one person in each of the 500 companies has an iPhone, then this could be said, too!
    The article states that " Also in 2019 are hundreds of different organizations that have over 10,000 Apple devices deployed." Take IBM for example. about 5 years ago, IBM had practically 0 Macs, now they have 200,000 and it doesn't appear that that number is getting smaller. It takes a few years to go through the typical cycle at IBM, but if IBM is finding that the Mac users are far more productive, what happens is that this will catch on with their other users and it's very possible, that more and more IBM employees will switch to a Mac when it's time for them to get a new computer. But having 40% Macs to PC isn't bad at all. That's a VERY respectable percentage. I don't know how many iPhones and iPads, but they probably have somewhere around 200,000 or so assorted iDevices in addition to the 200,000 Macs.
    applesnorangeswatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 20
    Apple will never break into the enterprise in any meaningful way due to one very basic fact... they do not provide support for any guranteed length of time. Enterprise customers demand stability, and Apple cannot provide that with their MO of rapid updates. No support for Mac OS older than the latest version. Even MS provided decade+ of support for XP.
  • Reply 15 of 20
    DRBDRB Posts: 34member
    Soli said:
    MacPro said:
     but ...but dentists still use Windows 7. ;)

    Fabulous news  ... as is AAPL ... just approaching $267!
    The title and article don't say much. Using Apple products in 100% of companies simply means that they either issue or allow iPhones and iPads for at least one employee. Chances are they are using Windows, Linux, and Unix servers, Windows for most of their traditional PCs, and then support iPhone and Android, and probably some iPads for various executive needs or particular employees that use it as an appliance. I'd be surprised if this stat hasn't been the case for a decade.
    And where's your proof? Obviously Apple doesn't go after the server market. But they do go after the laptop, desktop, tablet and smartphone markets. There was a statement in the articles that said that HUNDREDS of corporations have at least 10,000 Apple devices deployed. IBM has 200,000 Macs and God knows how many iPads and iPhones, probably another 200,000 devices is my guess. Some of these companies have been deploying iPhones and iPads for a while, only some are starting to deploy Macs, but the thing is, IBM went from O to 200,000 Macs in about 5 years. So give the rest of these companies time and see what happens. IBM/Japan, for example now has standardized on Macs and in order to get a PC, you have to submit a request and give actual reasons why you want a PC, and obviously not that many are requesting PCs at IBM Japan. Say what you want, more and more employees in the corporate world are using smartphones as much as they use any other device. In some cases, more. I believe that Apple has had a pretty steady amount of market share in the corporate world with iPhones. I think it's hovering at around 75% or so. And if Apple's getting more laptop and desktop sales into Corporate market, even better. Didn't Walmart just conclude a test with some Macs and after they concluded their tests, they decides to deploy 100,000 iMacs at WalMart Corporate? Face it, Macs and Apple devices are getting more and more traction in Corporate market, especially if the company offers these products to their employees to allow the employee to choose. For Windows to get their 90+% market share, they had to get companies to FORCE PCs onto their workforce. Forcing someone to use something doesn't mean that person WANTS to use the product and it doesn't mean it's better and it doesn't mean the employee is more productive. obviously IBM's internal metric indicate that their employees are more productive and happier, require less IT support and the overall cost are lower with Macs vs PCs. You can deny it all day long, but it's not going to change IBM's metrics by living in denial about this phenomenon.
    applesnorangeswatto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 20
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,030member
    DRB said:
    Soli said:
    MacPro said:
     but ...but dentists still use Windows 7. ;)

    Fabulous news  ... as is AAPL ... just approaching $267!
    The title and article don't say much. Using Apple products in 100% of companies simply means that they either issue or allow iPhones and iPads for at least one employee. Chances are they are using Windows, Linux, and Unix servers, Windows for most of their traditional PCs, and then support iPhone and Android, and probably some iPads for various executive needs or particular employees that use it as an appliance. I'd be surprised if this stat hasn't been the case for a decade.
    And where's your proof? Obviously Apple doesn't go after the server market. But they do go after the laptop, desktop, tablet and smartphone markets. There was a statement in the articles that said that HUNDREDS of corporations have at least 10,000 Apple devices deployed. IBM has 200,000 Macs and God knows how many iPads and iPhones, probably another 200,000 devices is my guess. Some of these companies have been deploying iPhones and iPads for a while, only some are starting to deploy Macs, but the thing is, IBM went from O to 200,000 Macs in about 5 years. So give the rest of these companies time and see what happens. IBM/Japan, for example now has standardized on Macs and in order to get a PC, you have to submit a request and give actual reasons why you want a PC, and obviously not that many are requesting PCs at IBM Japan. Say what you want, more and more employees in the corporate world are using smartphones as much as they use any other device. In some cases, more. I believe that Apple has had a pretty steady amount of market share in the corporate world with iPhones. I think it's hovering at around 75% or so. And if Apple's getting more laptop and desktop sales into Corporate market, even better. Didn't Walmart just conclude a test with some Macs and after they concluded their tests, they decides to deploy 100,000 iMacs at WalMart Corporate? Face it, Macs and Apple devices are getting more and more traction in Corporate market, especially if the company offers these products to their employees to allow the employee to choose. For Windows to get their 90+% market share, they had to get companies to FORCE PCs onto their workforce. Forcing someone to use something doesn't mean that person WANTS to use the product and it doesn't mean it's better and it doesn't mean the employee is more productive. obviously IBM's internal metric indicate that their employees are more productive and happier, require less IT support and the overall cost are lower with Macs vs PCs. You can deny it all day long, but it's not going to change IBM's metrics by living in denial about this phenomenon.
    Where's my proof of what? That saying 100% simply means at least 1 Apple devices? Well, common sense is my proof. Or do you mean my comment that it's been this way for a decade? I certainly don't need proof of that because I didn't state it as a fact, only that I'd be surprised if it hasn't been the case.

    What I didn't say—and yet somehow you read—is a very specific number or percentage of devices being from Apple. Even if your quote from the article is specifically referring to Fortune 500 companies (which isn't not) it wouldn't say how many Fortune 500 companies those are, how many devices, what kind of devices, or deployment types for Apps devices.

    Since the iOS App Store is the de facto store and even small companies have iOS apps, which means, even if they use Windows for their primary workstations, if they build that app in-house then a Mac would've been used. Is that really that hard to understand?

    It's great that you read another article posted about Macs today, but what does 200K Macs mean? I simply have no idea since I don't how many Windows PC are used throughout IBM's 400k full time employees, 2 million contractors, and 500 locations in 177 countries. If you think there's a 1:1 ratio to the number of employees to the number of PCs a company has then you're sorely mistaken.

    You seem to have gotten yourself all worked up because you failed to understand a story and the comments about a story that is titled with the obvious "100% of Fortune 500 companies are using Apple products." But since this is apparently news to you, I guess I'm simply not the target audience for today's self-evident news.


    PS: You may want to try using paragraphs, reducing your run-on sentences, formulating your comments in a more coherent manner, and trying to respond to the same comment a single time if you don't want to come off as a spaz.
    edited November 2019 fastasleepCloudTalkinphilboogie
  • Reply 17 of 20
    dewme said:
    wizard69 said:
    I would love to see Apple get back into education in a meaningful way.  I don’t mean expensive Macs or iPads running apps.  Rather I’d like to see a solution that targets technical education sort of like the way Raspberry PI does. 

    In other words a small single board computer that supports I/O, monitor and keyboard / mouse.  Imagine a slightly beefed up AppleTV for about $175.  That would include a case, power supply and a bunch of other “extras” a base Raspberry PI does offer.    Should be an easy do for Apple and everything but the monitor means easy management for schools.  
    Yes! I could not agree more. And make sure it allows an iPad to be used as both a monitor and keyboard.

    As nice as Swift Playgrounds is as an entry point into programming, there’s a lot more excitement to be had when you give kids or learners of any age a way to make physical things happen or animate under software control. They don’t even have to go head to head against existing programs like LEGO Mindstorms or First Robotics Competition, which are industrial arts focused. Maybe Apple can find ways to bring other liberal arts disciplines into the software integration mix. Not quite sure about what or how, but there’s a lot of creative talent in Apple and the liberal arts world to infuse new ideas. It doesn’t always have to be about robotics, manufacturing, or automation. 
    I don't get it. Why can't you do this with a Mac mini or an iPad even now?

    Apple's strategy lately has been to deliver 'appliance-like' devices, not user-serviceable. Even their new Mac Pro, which is positioned as being user-serviceable, still requires special "expansion modules" to be installed to get the most benefit.

    Far from a Raspberry Pi that starts out as a user-serviceable board.

    I don't see Apple going down this path at all. They are far too entrenched in their self-contained, consumer-focused, app-focused, service-focused path. Hardware is just the enabler. They are doing great things with hardware, but the finished product is very much an enclosed device designed to be replaced (by Apple) the following year (or six).
    That doesn't really answer my question. What could you do with a skeletonized uhhh what, Mac motherboard? iOS motherboard? that you couldn't do with a mini or iPad?  "And make sure it allows an iPad to be used as both a monitor and keyboard." — you can do that with a Mac mini.

    I have no idea what you mean about the Mac Pro in this context. By "special modules" you mean optional PCIe cards? What a bizarre counter-example to the Raspberry Pi.

    "far too entrenched" ... okay. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 20

    ralphie said:
    Apple will never break into the enterprise in any meaningful way due to one very basic fact... they do not provide support for any guranteed length of time. Enterprise customers demand stability, and Apple cannot provide that with their MO of rapid updates. No support for Mac OS older than the latest version. Even MS provided decade+ of support for XP.
    Except you're completely wrong. They support the current OS plus the previous two major versions with security updates pretty consistently, so about three years back with OS updates. Occasionally further back with some software things depending on necessity. Hardware they support for about 7 years before it becomes "obsolete" with regard to repairs. Current versions of macOS can usually be installed about as far back as 6-7 year old hardware at least if not older in some cases.
    lostkiwiwatto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 20
    19831983 Posts: 1,224member
    So? I imagine 100% of Fortune 500 companies use Microsoft products (software) too.
  • Reply 20 of 20
    Well, Mr. Butcher is from marketing, so he will harp on numbers that look good. There is probably absolute truth in his statements, but if you look at the whole picture, it really doesn't mean that much, as a lot of posters here have pointed out.
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