Phil Schiller offers scathing critique of Chromebook, calls it 'cheap testing tool'

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 34
    19831983 Posts: 1,225member
    Phil, jealous maybe? Even though I do agree an iPad with appropriate software would likely make for a more compelling educational experience for schoolchildren than anything from a Chromebook. 
  • Reply 22 of 34
    65026502 Posts: 380member
    My son was issued a chromebook as a freshman that is his to keep and use for the next 4 years. It retails for around $250 but includes (of course) a keyboard and is small, light and super portable. That, coupled with google docs is really a fantastic educational device. My guess is an iPad with keyboard is about double that and a bit clumsier. Phil is wrong on this.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 23 of 34
    ericesque said:
    Chromebooks remind me of the old dumb terminals I used to have to work on connected to an AS400 - can't do anything unless connected to the web.. Stupid machines..
    How often do you actually  use a Mac or iPad with no internet connection?
    I only turn on Wifi on mid-2009 MBP when I need to email something. Leaving it on reduces battery life from 5 hours to less than 2.

    But, of course, not too many people are using mid-2009 laptops like some kind of animal.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 24 of 34
    It would be great if all school kids could have a Macbook, or even an iPad with a keyboard. Most public schools districts lack the resources to buy anything from Apple - Chromebooks fill a niche (my kids use them for relatively straightforward online math and reading app access) and they work perfectly well.

    It's really unfortunate when someone like Schiller makes comments like this from his Cupertino ivory tower, it just confirms how supremely out of touch Apple is with public school education, as if there was any need to do that after the LA school district debacle. 
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 25 of 34
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,776member
    I don't know but I'd guess everything that a student ever reads or writes is being tracked for some future financial gain by Google and probably not anonymously either.
    edited November 2019 p-dogwatto_cobra
  • Reply 26 of 34
    davgregdavgreg Posts: 1,039member
    Except for classes that require a computer- like writing code- they need to go away.

    Give them a pencil and paper and make them write and freehand draw. Make them use a protractor and a compass.

    Test scores are dropping nationwide and it is interesting that the most sought after schools in Silicon Valley are what you would call low tech. The kids also do not have personal smart phones. Screen time is severely limited by the parents who work in tech.

    Young minds need to be writing with a pencil or pen on paper or painting with a real brush, playing a real- not virtual- instrument. They need to be reading dead tree books and making oral presentations in class- not PowerPoint/Keynote presentations in class. After they have mastered the skills by hand, then they can be instructed in how to apply those skills to the digital realm.

    If the wealthy, educated and informed parents are paying and standing in line to get their kids in schools doing it old school, why would you want to waste money buying devices for you and your neighbor’s kids?
    p-dogmuthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 27 of 34
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,350member
    chasm said:
    And c) Google's pledge about student privacy is a complete crock that has already been exposed in several claimed "bugs" (you know, like FB privacy "bugs") and the amount of data the company collects via Chrome, GMail, Google Photos and Google Docs is staggering. Cheap hardware means they are supplementing the profitability by selling your data -- and they have more on you than you could possibly remember about even yourself -- to parties that use that data abusively to manipulate you far more extensively than you may realise.
    Yeah, this particular paragraph from you is pretty much a crock, not very accurate at all.

    There is zero evidence that Google is monetizing personal data when a child uses a Chromebook at school. There is zero evidence that Google is using anything you write or receive in a Gmail for monetizing that users data. There is zero evidence that Google sells one iota of personal data. There is zero evidence that the pictures you store in Google Photos is monetized for ads...

    Do you even look before posting this stuff to make sure it's true, or is truth not your goal in the first place?
    edited November 2019 muthuk_vanalingamCloudTalkin
  • Reply 28 of 34
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,350member
    MacPro said:
    I don't know but I'd guess everything that a student ever reads or writes is being tracked for some future financial gain by Google and probably not anonymously either.
    Bad guess is still a guess. :)
    muthuk_vanalingamCloudTalkin
  • Reply 29 of 34
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,350member
    It would be great if all school kids could have a Macbook, or even an iPad with a keyboard. Most public schools districts lack the resources to buy anything from Apple - Chromebooks fill a niche (my kids use them for relatively straightforward online math and reading app access) and they work perfectly well.

    It's really unfortunate when someone like Schiller makes comments like this from his Cupertino ivory tower, it just confirms how supremely out of touch Apple is with public school education, as if there was any need to do that after the LA school district debacle. 
    9to5 Mac holds a similar opinion:
    "Chromebooks are some of the most dynamic computers on the market today, long offering the best of web apps — which some would attribute Mac’s own success to — and Android apps. More recently, Chromebooks gained support for Linux apps, which opens Chrome OS to potential use in computer science classes. When using a convertible Chromebook, the classroom utility increases even further, by offering the tablet experience when reading/learning, without sacrificing the physical keyboard needed when writing essays and papers.

     For Chromebooks to offer that best of both worlds experience at a low price sounds to me more like being a good value than being “cheap,” as Schiller calls it. And we all know affordable devices are what school districts on tight budgets need — not condescension."

    By the way, Schiller did walk his comments back after being roundly criticized for them. Now he says he didn't mean what had been reported, hewas just misunderstood. Many educators, parents, and other interested folks interpreted the statement to mean kids can’t succeed in school without an Apple notebook.

    What he really meant to say was:

    Every child has the ability to succeed — helping them to do that has always been our mission. In the full conversation with CNET, we discussed giving kids and teachers the content, curriculum and tools they need to learn, explore and grow. Not just to take a test.


    edited November 2019
  • Reply 30 of 34
    kevin keekevin kee Posts: 1,289member
    I see that Google police was doing damage control already. Although it's kinda disappointing that it took until page 2 for it to happen.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 31 of 34
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,350member
    kevin kee said:
    I see that Google police was doing damage control already. Although it's kinda disappointing that it took until page 2 for it to happen.
    Gotta make sure everyone got their opinions in before adding some reality to it. You should thank me. :)
  • Reply 32 of 34
    omasouomasou Posts: 603member
    Son would read gaming sites, YouTube, etc. and started complaining how Macs were overpriced b/c you could buy "better" gaming laptops for way less. Failed to understand that not all CPUs, RAM, SSD motherboard speeds, etc are not the same.

    In middle school they started using Chromebooks. Man what a cheap piece of garbage. He liked them until he really started to use them and Google services. He broke 3 of them in 2 years. The hinge just kept giving out.

    In HS they gave him a Windows machine. Thought that was better for a few weeks. Now he's finally starting to understand the differences.

    So maybe the exposure poorly implemented copy-cat technology is a good thing. ROFLMAO.
    edited November 2019 watto_cobra
  • Reply 33 of 34
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 5,043member
    Our education system is dumbing down the next generations. Yes Chromebooks are easy to use, with that easy it does not require the next generation to understand how computer system work or how to problem solve, just answer memorize answers. 

    Back in the day of Mainframe where all the work was done, and anyone who interacted with it did so through a terminal which was known as Dumb Terminal since it did not require any knowledge of how the mainframe worked. Today you have the Dumb Chromebook which interface with a backend system which does all the work and just displays the answer on the Chromebook. 
    watto_cobra
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