Apple cancelled encrypted iCloud plans after the FBI complained

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Comments

  • Reply 61 of 69
    jdb8167 said:
    rob53 said:
    This brings up another issue.  Users (businesses) really need alternatives to iCloud.  They’re out there but I don’t think they’ve ever been mentioned on AI.  I’ve used Acronis on servers and PCs and there products have worked well.  They do have a mobile app...
    Do you really think that ANY server platform in the US actually has user encryption? They might have system level encryption, like I believe Apple does with iCloud, but unless the user controls ALL the keys this data can be decrypted after the serving of a legal subpoena. Apple does this a whole lot while I imagine other server platforms, AWS, etc., simply make the data they store available to the FBI and NSA. 
    Backblaze offers this if you want to take on the effort of maintaining your own keys. Doesn't seem worth the hassle to me. 
    Visit - Ecommerce App Development
     

    edited January 2020
  • Reply 62 of 69
    I understand compromise, but come on. This just makes iCloud a less desirable platform.
    If you do not engage in criminal activity, then you do not have to fret as this pertains to criminals only. Your data is still safe in iCloud, just not from Big Daddy.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 63 of 69
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,510member
    jdb8167 said:
    rob53 said:
    This brings up another issue.  Users (businesses) really need alternatives to iCloud.  They’re out there but I don’t think they’ve ever been mentioned on AI.  I’ve used Acronis on servers and PCs and there products have worked well.  They do have a mobile app...
    Do you really think that ANY server platform in the US actually has user encryption? They might have system level encryption, like I believe Apple does with iCloud, but unless the user controls ALL the keys this data can be decrypted after the serving of a legal subpoena. Apple does this a whole lot while I imagine other server platforms, AWS, etc., simply make the data they store available to the FBI and NSA. 
    Backblaze offers this if you want to take on the effort of maintaining your own keys. Doesn't seem worth the hassle to me.
    https://thehackernews.com/2018/10/android-cloud-backup.html
  • Reply 64 of 69
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,796member
    Rayz2016 said:
    Yes, I broke my golden rule: check with the real experts elsewhere before commenting. 

    Yes, the backups are encrypted. The problem is that Apple has the key. 

    And the reason Apple keeps the keys instead of giving it to the users is because the users will lose the key (when they lose the device the we’re keeping it on) and then sue Apple when they couldn’t get hold of their stuff. 

    As usual, nothing to see here. 
    Yep. Sit in any Genius Bar area for 30 minutes or so. Guaranteed 2/3’s of the people coming in for help will either A.) not know their iCloud login, or B.) not know their password.

    Those of us that frequent this site live in a bubble. There’s a lot of clueless people out there.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 65 of 69
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,033member
    gatorguy said:
    jdb8167 said:
    rob53 said:
    This brings up another issue.  Users (businesses) really need alternatives to iCloud.  They’re out there but I don’t think they’ve ever been mentioned on AI.  I’ve used Acronis on servers and PCs and there products have worked well.  They do have a mobile app...
    Do you really think that ANY server platform in the US actually has user encryption? They might have system level encryption, like I believe Apple does with iCloud, but unless the user controls ALL the keys this data can be decrypted after the serving of a legal subpoena. Apple does this a whole lot while I imagine other server platforms, AWS, etc., simply make the data they store available to the FBI and NSA. 
    Backblaze offers this if you want to take on the effort of maintaining your own keys. Doesn't seem worth the hassle to me.
    https://thehackernews.com/2018/10/android-cloud-backup.html
    Gruber linked to a simple article about Android 9+'s encryption with a user-only key yesterday. Good on Google. 

    gatorguy
  • Reply 66 of 69
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,033member
    razorpit said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    Yes, I broke my golden rule: check with the real experts elsewhere before commenting. 

    Yes, the backups are encrypted. The problem is that Apple has the key. 

    And the reason Apple keeps the keys instead of giving it to the users is because the users will lose the key (when they lose the device the we’re keeping it on) and then sue Apple when they couldn’t get hold of their stuff. 

    As usual, nothing to see here. 
    Yep. Sit in any Genius Bar area for 30 minutes or so. Guaranteed 2/3’s of the people coming in for help will either A.) not know their iCloud login, or B.) not know their password.

    Those of us that frequent this site live in a bubble. There’s a lot of clueless people out there.
    What if Apple's key falls into the wrong hands? I seem to recall a employee being able to open up an Apple server to the outside world to steal company secrets. While this skeleton key to every iCloud account may be in the hands of someone honest and using Apple's very best security, I would rather not pretend that Apple's single-fault system is infallible.

    You and Rayz are correct in that most people are clueless about this stuff and probably should let Apple hold a key for them if they can't be responsible enough with their own data, but Apple has long since incorporated a solution to this by asking if you want Apple to store a key on their server as a fail safe. I see nothing wrong with Cook following up with his previous comments, law-abiding citizens and consumers before the gov't, and following Google's lead by offering a user key encrypted backup—like they have for macOS—that will tell give the option of letting Apple keep a key incase in they forget their device password.


    darkvader
  • Reply 67 of 69
    While the two-faced Cook spouts progressive platitudes, he kisses the ring of Trump and Xi Jinping
  • Reply 68 of 69
    sdw2001 said:
    I think this is probably a reasonable decision by Apple.  They need to be able to comply with subpoenas and warrants, which DOJ should have to get to unlock devices like they're requesting.  The issue I have is that I don't think there is a court order in the Pensacola case.  There needs to be one.  
    Yep. It's a reasonable decision by Apple. Not at all mendacious, a tad like Apple being fully compliant in levering every tax dodge its bloodhounds are trained to encounter.
    Apple is the new IBM like Borg, so terrifyingly portrayed in their 1984 Big Borg Brother advert:
    It's last three MacOSX releases have surpassed even Windows for its unconscionable numbers of bugs and interface hypocrisies 
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