Ring's app caught spying on users, sharing data with third-parties

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 29
    xbitxbit Posts: 371member
    Half of the apps on your phone send similar amounts of data. Analytics and tracking software is rife in mobile apps, including iOS apps.

    It’s strange that Apple’s guidelines say that user permission is needed for analytics but Apple’s reviewers never reject iOS apps for not asking.
  • Reply 22 of 29
    Every loyalty card and electronic device in every nook and cranny of our lives is gathering every tiny bit of data on us, for what purpose? To advertise to us? Not only do I neither care about advertisements, they more often then not remind me of products I either don’t want or purposely avoid because the commercials are abhorrent. For example Allstate and Geico latest commercials, or that insurance company with the guy acting like a dog. Absolutely disgusts me. And I wouldn’t ever buy anything I am not looking for or just because it’s advertised on  
    the internet if it does manage to get by my ad blockers, any more than I would listen to a robocallers pitch. I don’t even glance at internet ads so I couldn’t possibly learn or buy anything from them. I sit in amazement at the companies that are spending all this money on ads I won’t see, and most likely turn me off to their brand. So Amazon already knows what toilet paper I use and what net hardware I have. That doesn’t mean I won’t look for signs of the fake reviews, counterfeit merchandise they sell or cheaper prices elsewhere. So they have all this data. I don’t like it, have never had a Facebook account and just don’t see the purpose. Sometimes I just repeatedly click on ads for fun without ever looking at or reading them. And when I’m bored I will lead a robocall person on for 45 minutes with all kinds of phony statements seeing how many alternatives to the word “yes” I can come up with (ok, go ahead, proceed, I’m listening etc).
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 23 of 29
    peteopeteo Posts: 402member
    I have ring. This is not good.

    "Apple doesn't allow this type of data to be accessed without user knowledge"
    The question is when you open the app for the first time the app asks to agree to terms of service. I wonder if this gives them the cover to do this since all the trackers are in the app?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 24 of 29
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 2,246member
    Yikes, here we go again. My parents have these and admin them on Android phones. Tried to get me some for Xmas, I took a hard pass, specifically for this reason. 
    I do want some security cams for my home, but won’t install until I do enough research to put together a proper closed circuit system that doesn’t rely on 3rd party cloud monitoring. 
    These are our homes we’re talking about, I don’t get how people just turn their privacy over so easily. I guess the convenience out weighs the risk?
    Ever sense Amazon acquired RING, it's gone down into the crapper. I would go look at the Eufy doorbell. It is a wired connection though, no battery option at this time. But it has local storage on it. So no need to pay for cloud storage. The camera is better, and it's overall faster. Including letting you know that there is someone at your door. Go to YouTube for EUFY/RING comparisons. They also have other things like 100% wireless cameras (Like the ARLO's cameras) that you can also have local storage, not having to pay for cloud storage.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 25 of 29
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,509member
    jbdragon said:
    Yikes, here we go again. My parents have these and admin them on Android phones. Tried to get me some for Xmas, I took a hard pass, specifically for this reason. 
    I do want some security cams for my home, but won’t install until I do enough research to put together a proper closed circuit system that doesn’t rely on 3rd party cloud monitoring. 
    These are our homes we’re talking about, I don’t get how people just turn their privacy over so easily. I guess the convenience out weighs the risk?
    Ever sense Amazon acquired RING, it's gone down into the crapper. I would go look at the Eufy doorbell. It is a wired connection though, no battery option at this time. But it has local storage on it. So no need to pay for cloud storage. The camera is better, and it's overall faster. Including letting you know that there is someone at your door. Go to YouTube for EUFY/RING comparisons. They also have other things like 100% wireless cameras (Like the ARLO's cameras) that you can also have local storage, not having to pay for cloud storage.
    I have a Eufy bathroom scale meant to log my daily weight along with body measurements (bone mass, body fat, BMI, etc) but it is quite insistent on wanting to collect location data. No idea why that would be pertinent yet they insist on getting it every time I connect, and every time it asks I deny it. Otherwise, it's a very good scale. 
  • Reply 26 of 29
    jcs2305jcs2305 Posts: 1,308member
    gatorguy said:
    ktappe said:
    mike1 said:
    Just for clarity, it sounds like the iOS app doesn't allow this type of data to be shared. True?
    Unclear. We're trying to find out.
    Apple doesn't allow this type of data to be accessed without user knowledge. 
    Neither does Android 10. 

    As for sandboxing that's long been part of Android security. It's not a unique iOS thing. 

    Are all Android devices running Android 10?  Are they all capable enough to be updated?  I honestly don't know a ton about versions of Android the fragmentation that exists and how updating OS's are carried out. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 27 of 29
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,509member
    jcs2305 said:
    gatorguy said:
    ktappe said:
    mike1 said:
    Just for clarity, it sounds like the iOS app doesn't allow this type of data to be shared. True?
    Unclear. We're trying to find out.
    Apple doesn't allow this type of data to be accessed without user knowledge. 
    Neither does Android 10. 

    As for sandboxing that's long been part of Android security. It's not a unique iOS thing. 

    Are all Android devices running Android 10?  Are they all capable enough to be updated?  I honestly don't know a ton about versions of Android the fragmentation that exists and how updating OS's are carried out. 
    Pretty much anything from the past three years from the primary Android OEM's is plenty capable enough, even older ones like the original Pixel which didn't have the greatest of hardware. Whether the manufacturer themselves will update them is another story. Some are getting decent about it (ie Samsung, Sony, Motorola, OnePlus) while some of the smaller ones may give you one OS update but not bother with the others. It varies, but Google's efforts to push their OEM's and make life easier on them to do so over the past few years are finally paying off. Even the "cheap smartphone" manufacturers in places like India are now providing some semblance of Android OS updates due to Google's simplification of it. Far from great but a lot better than just 2 years ago. In fairness, many of the best features in each new version of Android ends up delivered to old "abandoned" ones running old OS versions by splitting off apps/features from the OS itself and updating via Google Play.  New OS versions aren't as essential as they were a few years back. 

    Those abandoned handsets also do have OS upgrade options beyond those provided by the OEM's. There are handsets out there 5-6 years and older running the latest versions of Android with flavors skinned on top. 
    edited January 2020
  • Reply 28 of 29
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 3,430member
    apple ][ said:
    That's hilarious. :D

    At a certain point, people are responsible for their own decisions and if people choose to continue to use shady products, then they obviously don't care about their privacy, and I don't care about their privacy either.
    Dude, you sit around reading all about these issues. It’s basically specialist knowledge at this point. Not every human being on planet Earth has that luxury to sit and comb through every single (fairly suppressed) dirty detail about the businesses and products that are marketed at them. Don’t be such a priss about it. Share your knowledge with people kindly, or just be quiet.
  • Reply 29 of 29
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 3,430member

    What else is new. 

    The public’s sentiment has significantly shifted on this issue. Attention to privacy is why Apple has the valuation that it does. 
    Has it? Is it?

    I’d like to agree, but I don’t really feel confident that it’s anything more than wishful thinking. 
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