Samsung botches 'Find My Mobile' test, sends users '1' notification worldwide

Posted:
in General Discussion edited February 2020
A large number of Samsung smartphone owners around the world discovered a mysterious message on their devices overnight, a notification that the company admits was part of an internal test gone wrong.

The Samsung Galaxy Z Flip, a new model recently launched by the company featuring a flexible display.
The Samsung Galaxy Z Flip, a new model recently launched by the company featuring a flexible display.


On Thursday morning, a contingent of Samsung Galaxy smartphone users discovered a notification was sent to their devices by Samsung. The push notification, as part of the company's Find My Mobile system, displayed the short message of the number "1" on smartphone screens.

It is unclear how many users were affected by the mysterious message, but indications show it was sent to as many users as possible via the Samsung device relocation service. What is known is that it is not limited to just a single country, with users around the world advising on social media of the message's appearance on their devices.

Why did my Samsung give me a Find My Mobile notification that just said 1 1? pic.twitter.com/BqSEFwkuA1



Along with providing a single character as the entire message, tapping the notification did nothing, when usually the action would take users to the relevant app. In some cases, users claimed the Find My Mobile app used a considerable amount of battery, though again with no indication for why it occurred.

Samsung told Yonhap News the message was sent as part of an "internal test," the message has "no effect on the customer's smartphone," and that it is "sorry for the inconvenience."

A similar advisement was made on Samsung's support forums via a "care ambassador" for the company ahead of the statement's release, with the poster believing it was a test to prove that "services are working."

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 16
    If this happened on iPhone, people would be loosing their minds saying that Apple is violating their privacy and trust, and the stock price would've taken a hit as well...
    BeatsronnlkruppStrangeDaysrazorpitolswilliamlondonentropysjbdragoncy_starkman
  • Reply 2 of 16
    sphericspheric Posts: 2,058member
    Instills trust in the reliability of that feature.
    lolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 16
    BeatsBeats Posts: 2,099member
    Sammy copied that too? Reminds me of "Find my Phone" where the knockoff iOS just dropped the "i", the MiPhone and MiMeji, everything Huawei does.
    ronnStrangeDaysjbdragonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 16
    Coincidentally, “1” is also the approximate number of months one of their folding phones will last until the screen breaks. 
    ronnBeatsStrangeDaysjbdragonlolliverredgeminipajony0watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 16
    BeatsBeats Posts: 2,099member
    mr lizard said:
    Coincidentally, “1” is also the approximate number of months one of their folding phones will last until the screen breaks. 
    Apple patented a folding screen and Sammy rushed this crap to market.

    Sounds familiar doesn't it?
    ronnolsjbdragonlolliverredgeminipajony0watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 16
    Haha, SAMSUNG doesn’t want to admit someone hacked their “find me, [with a mistress, with a drug dealer, with a criminal]” feature and know they got pwned so they say “internal test”. Yeah, right.  
    Beatsolsredgeminipawatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 16
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,009member
    gutengel said:
    If this happened on iPhone, people would be loosing their minds saying that Apple is violating their privacy and trust, and the stock price would've taken a hit as well...
    That's just the way it is. As Apple fans we should know that by now.
    Beatswilliamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 16
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,027member
    This made me think of The Lawnmower Man (1987). 

    FileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 16
    Soli said:
    This made me think of The Lawnmower Man (1987). 

    Android has become self aware. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 16
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 2,244member
    gutengel said:
    If this happened on iPhone, people would be loosing their minds saying that Apple is violating their privacy and trust, and the stock price would've taken a hit as well...
    Does this mean Samsung knows where everyone's phones were around the world at the time of doing this?
    cy_starkmanBeatswatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 16
    Samsung must have hired the guy that hit the nuclear missile alert button in Hawaii. 
    Soliwatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 16
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,027member
    Samsung must have hired the guy that hit the nuclear missile alert button in Hawaii. 
    LOL I had forgotten about that.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 16
    jbdragon said:
    gutengel said:
    If this happened on iPhone, people would be loosing their minds saying that Apple is violating their privacy and trust, and the stock price would've taken a hit as well...
    Does this mean Samsung knows where everyone's phones were around the world at the time of doing this?
    Of course, but I'm sure Google knows more precise locations than Shamsung does. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 16
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 22,828member
    jbdragon said:
    gutengel said:
    If this happened on iPhone, people would be loosing their minds saying that Apple is violating their privacy and trust, and the stock price would've taken a hit as well...
    Does this mean Samsung knows where everyone's phones were around the world at the time of doing this?
    It meant they knew how to contact every one of those phones. They may know the locations too, at least roughly if not specifically. How else to determine regional services for instance?

    Google and Apple would necessarily have to know on an OS level for push notifications and firmware/software updates as well as activation of certain services such as emergency reporting of a car crash or whatever. Apple for example may disable or modify specific features as you move between regions which may not allow an otherwise common function, something Google also does.  Many (most? all?) other OEM's also have a direct connection to their devices, ie OnePlus, LG, Motorola for various fixes/security updates and notifications.

    The cell providers of course know where you are at all times and some apps you use will also regularly record your location. 

    While you can entirely opt-out of the OS-level location services as long as you can deal with the inherent use(lessness) problems in doing so I'm not aware of how to easily disable the carriers knowing the location of your phone. I'm sure with enough time, effort and knowledge you can cover your tracks for the most part but it's not for the common user. That's what burner phones are for, not a personal one. 
    edited February 2020
  • Reply 15 of 16
    knowitallknowitall Posts: 1,648member
    1 FUBAR (have to add a few characters)
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 16
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 2,422member
    That was a botch? I wonder what they consider the flexible "glass" display on the Flip Z?

    A joke maybe?
    watto_cobra
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