Apple-sponsored 1979 Porsche 935 race car replica on sale for $499,000 [u]

Posted:
in General Discussion edited April 2020
While not the long-rumored Apple Car, an Apple-branded vehicle has gone on sale, with a replica of the extremely rare 1979 Porsche 935 K3 race car that once raced at Le Mans now available to purchase for $499,000.

Via DuPont Registry
Via DuPont Registry


Listed for sale on the DuPont Registry, the 1979 Porsche 935 is being sold by the Atlantis Motor Group. Priced at $499,000, or at a more reasonable $4,415 per month, the vehicle is a replica of a piece of Apple's history: a race car the company once sponsored.

The original was operated by Dick Barbour Racing, a team that had Apple as its main sponsor for its 1980 season, due to an interest by Jobs and Wozniak in the team, according to a profile of the vehicle by The Drive. The roster included Bob Garretson, Bobby Rahal, and Allan Moffat on the team, with the car itself bearing not only the Apple Computer name, but also its rainbow colors.





The genuine car had a short track career, finishing second at Riverside and Sears point amid lower-placed finishes and failures to cross the finish line. The car also notably attempted to compete at Le Mans, but retired 13 hours into the 24-hour race.

The sponsorship was a shrewd move, as in December that year the company went public and became the most profitable IPO in the United States.

The car in the DuPont Registry is not the original vehicle, however. The original is part of celebrity Adam Carolla's car collection, bought several years ago for $4.84 million, and is currently estimated to be valued at between $8 million and $10 million.

According to the product listing for the replica, the Porsche 935 K3 being sold actually contains a number of GT2 components, including a 3.8 TT build by Bob Holcomb, a GT2 6-speed transmission, and a double wish-bone 993 rear suspension module. Able to put out more than 700 horsepower, the top speed is estimated at over 200 miles per hour, and is claimed to be still capable of being competitive at the Daytona Classic 24 with the right team.

If rumors are to be believed, this is not the last time Apple will dabble in the automotive world. It is believed a commercial Apple car is in development, one that may have a vast number of features that differ from traditional car designs.

Update: Matt D'Andria, a co-host of the CarCast podcast with Adam Carolla and the manager of his car collection, contacted AppleInsider about the real car, which is currently part of Carolla's collection of 12 racing cars driven by Paul Neuman. AppleInsider has updated the story to reflect this, and to clarify that the car advertised in the listing is a replica.
watto_cobra

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 20
    The sponsorship was a shrewd move, as in December that year the company went public and became the most profitable IPO in the United States.

    Post hoc ergo propter hoc

    darkvaderXedDAalsethSpamSandwich
  • Reply 2 of 20

    Post hoc ergo propter hoc

    as per wikipedia, "the rooster crows immediately before sunrise; therefore the rooster causes the sun to rise."
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 3 of 20
    dewmedewme Posts: 3,946member
    I guess we’ll find out if Jay Leno is an Apple fan. 
    fotoformatDAalsethtenchi211watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 20
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,633member


    The car had a short track career, finishing second at Riverside and Sears point amid lower-placed finishes and failures to cross the finish line. The car also notably attempted to compete at Le Mans, but retired 13 hours into the 24-hour race.


    Apple, always behind, always second, always losing.

    Sincerely yours,

    The AI Troll Army
    Beatstenchi211cgWerkswatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 20
    seanismorrisseanismorris Posts: 1,624member
    Kind of strange Microsoft went public 6 years after Apple.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 20
    Unfortunately, the article is factually incorrect.  The car referenced in this article is 1. not the rare 1979 Apple liveried 935 K3 that raced at Le Mans, 2. was never sponsored by Apple, and 3 the video in the article is not the Apple 935 K3.  The car in the article is a replica (hence the cheap $500K price tag) basically built from a GT2 chassis. 

    Tangent: The replica being an older reskinned GT2 is ironic since the new Porsche 935, built as an homage to the original, is basically just a new GT2 RS reskinned to race spec.  Details here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xT2EhcwoO6k

    Fun fact:  The real Apple 935 K3 is owned by Adam Carolla.  He paid a whopping $4.4 million for the car because it was owned by Paul Newman.  Story here.  It won a class victory and 2nd overall at the 1979 24hr of Le Mans with Newman co-driving with Barbour and Stommelen. Apple only sponsored the car for one season since the 1980 campaign was not very successful.  The car went back to it's primary sponsor, Hawaiian Tropic (the livery it wears now) and subsequently won the '81 24hrs of Daytona and '83 12hrs of Sebring.  

    Carolla is a die hard Paul Newman fanboy.  He owns 10 of Newman's race cars.  Personally I think the truth is a better story than the original.

    fotoformatGG1russwXedyoyo222222july2013DAalsethviclauyycdewmestompy
  • Reply 7 of 20
    jd_in_sbjd_in_sb Posts: 1,600member
    How is it that this car is still around with original paint job?
  • Reply 8 of 20
    BeatsBeats Posts: 2,642member
    That's one mean machine.

    Waiting for this one to go on auction:


    tenchi211cgWerksrazorpitMplsPrandominternetperson
  • Reply 9 of 20
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 2,932member
    Fun fact:  The real Apple 935 K3 is owned by Adam Carolla.  He paid a whopping $4.4 million for the car
    wow such talent
    /s
    spheric
  • Reply 10 of 20
    dewmedewme Posts: 3,946member
    Unfortunately, the article is factually incorrect.  The car referenced in this article is 1. not the rare 1979 Apple liveried 935 K3 that raced at Le Mans, 2. was never sponsored by Apple, and 3 the video in the article is not the Apple 935 K3.  The car in the article is a replica (hence the cheap $500K price tag) basically built from a GT2 chassis. 

    Tangent: The replica being an older reskinned GT2 is ironic since the new Porsche 935, built as an homage to the original, is basically just a new GT2 RS reskinned to race spec.  Details here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xT2EhcwoO6k

    Fun fact:  The real Apple 935 K3 is owned by Adam Carolla.  He paid a whopping $4.4 million for the car because it was owned by Paul Newman.  Story here.  It won a class victory and 2nd overall at the 1979 24hr of Le Mans with Newman co-driving with Barbour and Stommelen. Apple only sponsored the car for one season since the 1980 campaign was not very successful.  The car went back to it's primary sponsor, Hawaiian Tropic (the livery it wears now) and subsequently won the '81 24hrs of Daytona and '83 12hrs of Sebring.  

    Carolla is a die hard Paul Newman fanboy.  He owns 10 of Newman's race cars.  Personally I think the truth is a better story than the original.

    Thanks for the info. The low price should have been a clue, with vintage Porsche race cars like the 917K fetching around $15 million and less in-demand models being in the $5 million to $10 million range. Definitely a big boy toy for big boys with massive wallets.
    CloudTalkin
  • Reply 11 of 20
    dewme said:
    Unfortunately, the article is factually incorrect.  The car referenced in this article is 1. not the rare 1979 Apple liveried 935 K3 that raced at Le Mans, 2. was never sponsored by Apple, and 3 the video in the article is not the Apple 935 K3.  The car in the article is a replica (hence the cheap $500K price tag) basically built from a GT2 chassis. 

    Tangent: The replica being an older reskinned GT2 is ironic since the new Porsche 935, built as an homage to the original, is basically just a new GT2 RS reskinned to race spec.  Details here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xT2EhcwoO6k

    Fun fact:  The real Apple 935 K3 is owned by Adam Carolla.  He paid a whopping $4.4 million for the car because it was owned by Paul Newman.  Story here.  It won a class victory and 2nd overall at the 1979 24hr of Le Mans with Newman co-driving with Barbour and Stommelen. Apple only sponsored the car for one season since the 1980 campaign was not very successful.  The car went back to it's primary sponsor, Hawaiian Tropic (the livery it wears now) and subsequently won the '81 24hrs of Daytona and '83 12hrs of Sebring.  

    Carolla is a die hard Paul Newman fanboy.  He owns 10 of Newman's race cars.  Personally I think the truth is a better story than the original.

    Thanks for the info. The low price should have been a clue, with vintage Porsche race cars like the 917K fetching around $15 million and less in-demand models being in the $5 million to $10 million range. Definitely a big boy toy for big boys with massive wallets.
    The low price was the reason I dug deeper.  It seemed so far from the normal vintage race car range, especially a car that has famous provenance. In the case of this car, doubly famous provenance with Newman's ownership and the unique limited time Apple livery and sponsorship.  No way the real car would have gone for $500K.  It begged to be fact checked.
    randominternetperson
  • Reply 12 of 20
    I had always wondered why Apple never sponsored race cars considering all the money they had, but now I see that it did, once upon a time. Nice replica. What Apple car? I heard that Apple gave up the idea and decided to design AI auto software instead. I don't think Apple would stand a chance with an actual car. All the analysts keep claiming no other auto manufacturer can beat Tesla because of the entire Tesla ecosystem. If they think Tesla vehicles are locked-down, I'd hate to see how locked-down some Apple car would be. If a set of wheels for the Mac Pro is $700, I'd hate to see the cost of a set for an actual Apple car.
    zoetmb
  • Reply 13 of 20
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,403moderator
    I wonder what will become of the value of these ICE cars in a decade when electric cars have obliterated all the records to the point of making ICE cars seem quaint relics.  Was there much of a trade in classic horse drawn buggies 20 years into the ICE age?  

    Looking forward to the release of the 1.9s 0-100kph Tesla Roadster.  Also looking forward to the YouTube videos that will come soon enough regarding the Track V2 update for the Model 3 Performance.  It’s amazing what can be done sitting in the driver’s seat tapping on a touch screen.  You want the car to become rear wheel drive for drifting?  No wrenching required, just turn off the front motor, assuming you’ve downloaded the Track V2 update.  That’s just one of a good number of capabilities included in the Track software.  It’s like a real-life video game; buy one car, tap on the display to configure it for any number of specialized applications.  ICE can’t compete, and will evaporate from many people’s shopping lists as more advanced assisted driving capabilities are introduced, through over the air software updates. 

    And just wait for the day you can schedule your car to go off on its own and join the robo-taxi fleet while you’re not using it.  The money will flow into your account.  The ICE age is coming to a close.  
    edited May 2020
  • Reply 14 of 20
    I wonder what will become of the value of these ICE cars in decade when electric cars have obliterated all the records to the point of making ICE cars seem quaint relecs.  Was there much of a trade in classic horse drawn buggies 20 years into the ICE age?  

    And just wait for the day you can schedule your car The Philippines go off on its own an join the robo-taxi fleet while you’re not using it.  The money will flow into your account.  The ICE age is coming to a close.  
    A lot of these ICE Classics will be converted to battery power. Some have been done already and without any alteration (ie, cutting or drilling) to the existing body shell whch means that they can be sold (with preserved ICE Engine) at a future date with a proper providence.

    As for money flowing into your account with RoboTaxis... Dream on. There will be a huge oversupply of people with the same idea as you.
    Not everyone who has an EV wants 100% autonomy. I love driving mine (not a Tesla) and long may that continue.
    CloudTalkinwatto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 20
    jd_in_sb said:
    How is it that this car is still around with original paint job?

    I'm not sure if the article was updated later, but it says that this is a replica.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 20
    "The original is part of celebrity Adam Carolla's car collection, bought several years ago for $4.84 million, and is currently estimated to be valued at between $8 million and $10 million."

    Strange how every market that wealthy people participate in during the 21st century features a magical doubling or tripling of their investment in a few short years.
    edited April 2020
  • Reply 17 of 20
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,796member
    I wonder what will become of the value of these ICE cars in decade when electric cars have obliterated all the records to the point of making ICE cars seem quaint relecs.  Was there much of a trade in classic horse drawn buggies 20 years into the ICE age?  

    Looking forward the time release of the 1.9s 0-100kph Tesla Roadster.  Also looking forward to the YouTube videos that will come soon enough regarding the Track V2 update for the Model 3 Performance.  It’s amazing what can be done sitting in the driver’s seat tapping on a touch screen.  You want the car to become rear wheel drive for drifting?  No wrenching required, just turn off the front motor, assuming you’ve downloaded the Track V2 update.  That just one of a good number of capabilities included in the Track software.  It’s like a real-life video game; but one car, tap on the display to configure it for any number of specialized applications.  ICE can’t compete, and will evaporate from many people’s shopping lists as more advanced assisted driving capabilities are introduced, through over the air software updates. 

    And just wait for the day you can schedule your car The Philippines go off on its own an join the robo-taxi fleet while you’re not using it.  The money will flow into your account.  The ICE age is coming to a close.  
    There will be a point in the future when EV's outnumber ICE's. If you're lucky you may live to see that day. Unfortunately for you you will have to take a robot-taxi because you won't be trusted to drive at your advanced age. My kids that are 7 and 11 might still be young enough to drive when that day comes.

    To answer your question, horse drawn carriages are collectors items. As well as the EV's and steamers from the early 20th century.

    There's no doubt the day will come when EV's will obliterate every ICE record. Then the day will come when whatever replaces EV's blows away those records. That's how technology works. Until then, for the next several decades, the world will continue to enjoy the conveniences of the ICE.
    CloudTalkin
  • Reply 18 of 20
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,602member
    "The original is part of celebrity Adam Carolla's car collection, bought several years ago for $4.84 million, and is currently estimated to be valued at between $8 million and $10 million."

    Strange how every market that wealthy people participate in during the 21st century features a magical doubling or tripling of their investment in a few short years.
    That's not what I find strange.   What I find strange is that an annoying dolt like Adam Carolla can afford to spend $4.84 million on a car.  How exactly did he make that much money?   I can see a guy like him making $200-$300,000 a year (and even that is offensive, IMO), but he had to make many $millions to be able to spend almost $5 million on a car.  

  • Reply 19 of 20
    All the analysts keep claiming no other auto manufacturer can beat Tesla because of the entire Tesla ecosystem. 
    Really?  Are any analysts saying that, let along all?
  • Reply 20 of 20
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,428member
    Kind of strange Microsoft went public 6 years after Apple.
    I  there is a time delay if you take into account the time it took to steal CP/M and a few years later steal Mac OS .
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