'Scoob!' coming to iTunes on May 15, bypassing theaters and rental windows entirely

Posted:
in General Discussion edited May 2020
Instead of a theater release in May, or a digital rental period, Warner Brothers will release their new movie 'Scoob!' on iTunes for a $25 one-time purchase.

Scoob!' is the first movie to skip theaters and rentals to go to a premium pricing model
Scoob!' is the first movie to skip theaters and rentals to go to a premium pricing model


After the success of "Trolls" from Universal releasing direct to on-demand services, Warner Brothers is following suit with its own approach. "Scoob!" is the first high profile movie to skip theatrical release and a rental window entirely, and will be available for purchase at a premium $24.99.

New iTunes releases from AAA studios usually retail for $19.99 for a digital purchase. This purchase includes any content available for the movie, and the 4K version if it exists. More recently, straight-to-streaming rentals for movies unable to release theatrically have been priced at $19.99 for a 48 hour rental.

Customers had to choose between buying a movie when its rental window closed, or viewing the movie weeks or months sooner by renting it for the same price. This created a problem, as people who wanted to view the early rental, then purchase the final release would spend $40 on a single film.

Warner Brothers seems to see the issue with rental pricing, and is taking a new approach with their release of "Scoob!" on iTunes. Instead of having customers pay twice for a single movie, they are allowing them to buy the movie outright, although for a premium. There has never been a single movie on iTunes for $24.99, so this breaks new territory as companies try to offset the losses brought on by the lockdown.

Some movies that were able to premiere right before the lockdown have seen much shorter theatrical releases as well. Paramount's "Sonic the Hedgehog" was released for $19.99 well before a normal theatrical run would allow.

Home premieres of blockbuster movies is just part of the new normal as the world adjusts to life on lockdown. The coronavirus pandemic has caused many industries to halt and has affected Apple and the entertainment industry as a whole in unprecedented ways.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 14
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,689member
    Twenty-five dollars! … Zoinks!

    acheron2018Wesley HilliardpulseimagesrazorpitDoodpantsArloTimetraveler
  • Reply 2 of 14
    It only makes sense. When the biggest best experience possible was 500i on a 25 inch screen, theaters made sense.  

    Now when even people well below middle class routinely have 4K on a 48 inch screen, going to a theater to
    * Pay $10+ per person.  For the “privilege” of
      * paying $30 for popcorn and a drink
      To then  
       * listen to people talk
       * and babies scream
       * with your feet sticking to the floor

    ALL WHILE YOU HAVE TO PEE from your $11 96oz drink...

    The math just doesn’t work anymore. 
    razorpitfastasleeppulseimages
  • Reply 3 of 14
    Scooby Dooby Doo,  where are you !?! Not at my house. :'(
    edited May 2020
  • Reply 4 of 14
    mbdrake76mbdrake76 Posts: 36member
    And again, what's to stop Warner Bros. from pulling the title from iTunes entirely later down the line (without notice), preventing any "redownloads" or future streaming? Apple needs to do more to ensure that (a) if this does happen, customers are notified in advance and (b) put a stop to the practice entirely (if you sell content to iTunes, they get to keep a copy in perpetuity for those people who have bought it, even if it's no longer being offered for sale).
    pulseimagesrazorpit
  • Reply 5 of 14
    pulseimagespulseimages Posts: 319member
    AMC can complain all they want but their vehicle for showing movies is quickly dying. Even before the pandemic the theater experience has been waning with higher prices and lower attendance rates. The AMC near me has fallen into disrepair with torn up recliners and a rodent infestation. 
  • Reply 6 of 14
    Wesley HilliardWesley Hilliard Posts: 27member, moderator, editor
    mbdrake76 said:
    And again, what's to stop Warner Bros. from pulling the title from iTunes entirely later down the line (without notice), preventing any "redownloads" or future streaming? Apple needs to do more to ensure that (a) if this does happen, customers are notified in advance and (b) put a stop to the practice entirely (if you sell content to iTunes, they get to keep a copy in perpetuity for those people who have bought it, even if it's no longer being offered for sale).
    While such dread may exist for those who like the physicality of their movie collection, I’ve only seen a few rare issues with availability, usually due to some server error. If digital purchases disappearing is still a concern, you can still get a big HDD and save everything you buy in case of such an apocalyptic measure.

    Just as a disk or VHS might break years after purchase, a digital copy might get pulled. I’ve yet to hear of something high profile being pulled in the years of me purchasing content exclusively digitally on iTunes, but if a movie does disappear suddenly, it’s available elsewhere. That risk is so low however, I’ll take the near infinite longevity of a digital copy and not needing to get up to change a movie as a trade.

    Another bonus of digital content: The members of my family plan, including my sister who lives states away, can take advantage of my collection. Theoretically as long as there is a company hosting iTunes content and an internet connection, my collection will last well after I die.
  • Reply 7 of 14
    mbdrake76 said:
    And again, what's to stop Warner Bros. from pulling the title from iTunes entirely later down the line (without notice), preventing any "redownloads" or future streaming? Apple needs to do more to ensure that (a) if this does happen, customers are notified in advance and (b) put a stop to the practice entirely (if you sell content to iTunes, they get to keep a copy in perpetuity for those people who have bought it, even if it's no longer being offered for sale).
    I have yet to see that happen with movies purchased through iTunes and as mentioned above purchased movies can be downloaded. In fact, years and years ago (back in the SD movies days) I received a code for a free digital copy of “Enemy of the State” with Will Smith. I entered the code and downloaded the movie. Years later when it was announced that all movies purchased through iTunes would be upgraded to HD at no charge I checked to see if I could re-download “Enemy of the State” in HD. I couldn’t as the movie was no longer available on iTunes. It was still available in my library, though, and I could still watch it. After that I would periodically search for EotS on iTunes just to see if it was back and for a long time it wasn’t. However, it’s back now AND my copy has been upgraded to HD.
    fastasleeppscooter63pulseimages
  • Reply 8 of 14
    ITGUYINSDITGUYINSD Posts: 245member
    It only makes sense. When the biggest best experience possible was 500i on a 25 inch screen, theaters made sense.  

    Now when even people well below middle class routinely have 4K on a 48 inch screen, going to a theater to
    * Pay $10+ per person.  For the “privilege” of
      * paying $30 for popcorn and a drink
      To then  
       * listen to people talk
       * and babies scream
       * with your feet sticking to the floor

    ALL WHILE YOU HAVE TO PEE from your $11 96oz drink...

    The math just doesn’t work anymore. 
    Agreed, but speaking of math, if I have to watch it in my home on my TV, would I rather pay $25 or wait a month and pay $2 for redbox blu-ray or $5 for on-demand? 

    I mean, who really NEEDS to see Scoob! right this minute for $25?  I'll choose to wait.  The $23 in savings buys a lot of popcorn and candy and soda at the grocery store!
    pulseimages
  • Reply 9 of 14
    BeatsBeats Posts: 2,050member
    It only makes sense. When the biggest best experience possible was 500i on a 25 inch screen, theaters made sense.  

    Now when even people well below middle class routinely have 4K on a 48 inch screen, going to a theater to
    * Pay $10+ per person.  For the “privilege” of
      * paying $30 for popcorn and a drink
      To then  
       * listen to people talk
       * and babies scream
       * with your feet sticking to the floor

    ALL WHILE YOU HAVE TO PEE from your $11 96oz drink...

    The math just doesn’t work anymore. 

    Unless you appreciate audio like myself. Those theaters aren't running 48 inch Samsung TVs. They're engineered with high quality audio visual equipment. The sub-woofer alone costs more than your TV.
    pscooter63
  • Reply 10 of 14
    BeatsBeats Posts: 2,050member
    mbdrake76 said:
    And again, what's to stop Warner Bros. from pulling the title from iTunes entirely later down the line (without notice), preventing any "redownloads" or future streaming? Apple needs to do more to ensure that (a) if this does happen, customers are notified in advance and (b) put a stop to the practice entirely (if you sell content to iTunes, they get to keep a copy in perpetuity for those people who have bought it, even if it's no longer being offered for sale).

    WTF?! They're doing this? I had to reset my Apple TV a year ago and the 2 best video games (Minecraft, Duck Tales) were taken off the App Store so I lost them. Funny thing is I paid the most for these games. What a scummy move. Apple should have a policy where if you remove a movie/game/etc. everyone's iTunes accounts are refunded. That would stop these as*holes.
  • Reply 11 of 14
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 5,264member
    ITGUYINSD said:
    It only makes sense. When the biggest best experience possible was 500i on a 25 inch screen, theaters made sense.  

    Now when even people well below middle class routinely have 4K on a 48 inch screen, going to a theater to
    * Pay $10+ per person.  For the “privilege” of
      * paying $30 for popcorn and a drink
      To then  
       * listen to people talk
       * and babies scream
       * with your feet sticking to the floor

    ALL WHILE YOU HAVE TO PEE from your $11 96oz drink...

    The math just doesn’t work anymore. 
    Agreed, but speaking of math, if I have to watch it in my home on my TV, would I rather pay $25 or wait a month and pay $2 for redbox blu-ray or $5 for on-demand? 

    I mean, who really NEEDS to see Scoob! right this minute for $25?  I'll choose to wait.  The $23 in savings buys a lot of popcorn and candy and soda at the grocery store!
    I'm sure at this point some people will readily throw $25 at iTunes to get their kids to shut up for 90 minutes.
    pulseimages
  • Reply 12 of 14
    JBSloughJBSlough Posts: 66member
    mbdrake76 said:
    And again, what's to stop Warner Bros. from pulling the title from iTunes entirely later down the line (without notice), preventing any "redownloads" or future streaming? Apple needs to do more to ensure that (a) if this does happen, customers are notified in advance and (b) put a stop to the practice entirely (if you sell content to iTunes, they get to keep a copy in perpetuity for those people who have bought it, even if it's no longer being offered for sale).
    You do know you can download purchased movies and tv shows to your Mac or on an external drive.
  • Reply 13 of 14
    So far Apple has not restricted anyone's video purchases that I've heard of. The problem is with the whole thing going belly-up. Today it's impossible to think of Apple going out of business, but I would have said the same about Sears in 1995. We saw Ultraviolet go under with a convoluted process to try and move your purchased videos (I lost two movies, which I got via "free" codes). All it takes is a license change, a time in the future when Sony/Universal/etc has more clout than Apple at the table and you have the potential to lose your download. Not to mention region issues ( I'm an American who lives in Japan, I battle "not available in your region" all the time with legally paid for content). Blu-rays and DVD have region coding as well, but it's easy to bypass in hardware with a cheap player, and those discs will never not play (I've never had any bitrot on me, although I have had CD-Rs bitrot) 
  • Reply 14 of 14
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 5,264member
    So far Apple has not restricted anyone's video purchases that I've heard of. The problem is with the whole thing going belly-up. Today it's impossible to think of Apple going out of business, but I would have said the same about Sears in 1995. We saw Ultraviolet go under with a convoluted process to try and move your purchased videos (I lost two movies, which I got via "free" codes). All it takes is a license change, a time in the future when Sony/Universal/etc has more clout than Apple at the table and you have the potential to lose your download. Not to mention region issues ( I'm an American who lives in Japan, I battle "not available in your region" all the time with legally paid for content). Blu-rays and DVD have region coding as well, but it's easy to bypass in hardware with a cheap player, and those discs will never not play (I've never had any bitrot on me, although I have had CD-Rs bitrot) 
    Apple going out of business? Let me just pour one out in advance for your digital copy of Avatar you won't be able to watch for the six hundredth time in this nightmarish hellscape future you've imagined.
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