Eero Mesh Wi-Fi HomeKit router now available on Apple Store

Posted:
in General Discussion edited May 2020
The Amazon-owned Eero HomeKit router system is now available to purchase directly through Apple's online store, though units there are not expected to ship until mid-June.




In February, Eero received an update that made it HomeKit compliant, making it the first mesh router to support Apple's smart home platform.

With HomeKit support, users can restrict communication for smart home devices to only communicate in the home, to the default connections recommended by the manufacturer, or no restriction whatsoever. With smart home devices controlling everything from our lights to our locks, knowing that they are prevented from sending data outside your abode can offer a great deal of peace of mind.

Apple is now selling several Eero products, including the Eero Mesh WiFi System for $249.95 on the Apple Store. It covers up to 5,000 square feet, making it perfect for covering larger homes and even outdoor spaces.

The Apple Store listing highlights that Eero can be set up in less than 10 minutes and controlled by the Eero app from anywhere. Additionally, TrueMesh technology allows Eero to route traffic to avoid congestion, buffering, and drop-offs.

The downside is that Eero WiFi Mesh systems currently won't ship from the Apple Store until June, with deliveries not expected to arrive until June 12 at the earliest, or as late as June 29 for some customers.

Additionally, Apple is selling standalone Eero Pro Mesh WiFi Routers for $199.95, which is available for immediate shipping.

However, Eero is also obviously available on Amazon. Those who have Amazon Prime can get Eero as early as Friday. If purchased through Amazon, Eero is also comes with a free Echo Dot, and is priced at $249.00.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    I would love to see a router that could function as a Homekit hub.   Right now I'm using an old iPad for that -- but I have to be careful to keep it charged.  And, I simply can't justify buying an AppleTV or HomePod simply so they could serve as a hub.   A router would be ideal
    roundaboutnowdewme
  • Reply 2 of 11
    I would love to see a router that could function as a Homekit hub.   Right now I'm using an old iPad for that -- but I have to be careful to keep it charged.  And, I simply can't justify buying an AppleTV or HomePod simply so they could serve as a hub.   A router would be ideal
    I second the motion for HomeKit hub router (ideally a mesh router)...

    I'm prone to "creeping featurism" so I imagined an all-in-one device: a combined modem/router/AppleTV/Hub/NAS device. Sounds crazy (and probably expensive), but the potential for a plug-and-play solution for home network, back-up and app/media management is enticing.

    That said, I thought a used 4th gen ATV as a hub might be a cheap way out--nope, they're still commanding $130 or so. Now that's crazy (and impressive).
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 11
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,891member
    The same Eero that was bought by Amazon? No thanks.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 11
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,891member
    I would love to see a router that could function as a Homekit hub.   Right now I'm using an old iPad for that -- but I have to be careful to keep it charged.  And, I simply can't justify buying an AppleTV or HomePod simply so they could serve as a hub.   A router would be ideal
    why not just leave it plugged in?
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 11
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 1,940member
    I am still baffled by Apple’s exodus from the router market, just as HomeKit becomes a thing. Having an Apple device at the heart of HomeKit should be the height of  that security “peace of mind” that Apple customers want.

    To enable consistent telework activity from locations throughout the house, I recently spent many hours trying to get a top-of-the-line Netgear range extender to supplement my AirPort Time Capsule router. It was an abject failure. Even a swapped-out replacement Netgear device ultimately wouldn’t broadcast a signal better than 10 MB/s. Seriously, it was inexplicably horrible. Netgear claimed its device would work with all routers, and advertised a simple setup procedure. Their setup app was glitchy and confusing, and their non-app browser-based setup interface wasn’t much better. Both the original device and its second-try replacement would take a good five or six minutes just to boot up to even start the process, and it would go downhill from there. 

    To the rescue was a friend’s surplussed AirPort Extreme router. About three minutes after plugging it in, I was up and running with an extension of my existing network, with the same high-bandwidth SSID connection throughout the house. Without a hitch, devices that would benefit from it automatically migrated over to the second router. It was the quintessential “it just works” Apple experience. Why they’ve abandoned that to third-party manufacturers, I do not know. I’ll be sticking with this set up as long as it keeps working and hope that Apple will eventually reconsider their decision. 


    GeorgeBMacinTIMidatorwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 11
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,927member
    I guess this means no return for Airport. Shame as all I want is an iCloud content accelerator for docs, videos & photos. Strange they didn’t come up with one or integrate it into the AppleTV.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 11
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    AppleZulu said:
    I am still baffled by Apple’s exodus from the router market, just as HomeKit becomes a thing. Having an Apple device at the heart of HomeKit should be the height of  that security “peace of mind” that Apple customers want.

    To enable consistent telework activity from locations throughout the house, I recently spent many hours trying to get a top-of-the-line Netgear range extender to supplement my AirPort Time Capsule router. It was an abject failure. Even a swapped-out replacement Netgear device ultimately wouldn’t broadcast a signal better than 10 MB/s. Seriously, it was inexplicably horrible. Netgear claimed its device would work with all routers, and advertised a simple setup procedure. Their setup app was glitchy and confusing, and their non-app browser-based setup interface wasn’t much better. Both the original device and its second-try replacement would take a good five or six minutes just to boot up to even start the process, and it would go downhill from there. 

    To the rescue was a friend’s surplussed AirPort Extreme router. About three minutes after plugging it in, I was up and running with an extension of my existing network, with the same high-bandwidth SSID connection throughout the house. Without a hitch, devices that would benefit from it automatically migrated over to the second router. It was the quintessential “it just works” Apple experience. Why they’ve abandoned that to third-party manufacturers, I do not know. I’ll be sticking with this set up as long as it keeps working and hope that Apple will eventually reconsider their decision. 


    Agreed (though I haven't always, unfortunately).

    I managed to find an Airport Express on eBay, but I got lucky.
    caladanianwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 11
    tommy65tommy65 Posts: 56member
    Using two routers with one in bridge mode helped me out to be able to stream everywhere in my house.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 11
    NaiyasNaiyas Posts: 104member
    I would love to see a router that could function as a Homekit hub.   Right now I'm using an old iPad for that -- but I have to be careful to keep it charged.  And, I simply can't justify buying an AppleTV or HomePod simply so they could serve as a hub.   A router would be ideal
    Completely agree on the router as a Homekit hub point. It would also appear to be a far better location to apply battery backup at the router level only rather than across a plethora of other locations.

    Fortunately I've recently done a full renovation. Having now kitted it out with Cat7 ethernet cable and a limited number of battery backup power sockets I have a few options available to me. I do leverage POE for WiFi access points and the various smart home hubs which makes my provision of UPS back-up power much easier to deploy to my network as its all connected in one location - hence a Homekit hub router and POE access points would be fantastic to have as options. In the interim I use the battery backup sockets I do have to power my Apple TVs to maintain full home control even when there is a power cut.
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 11
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 4,053member
    Rayz2016 said:
    AppleZulu said:
    I am still baffled by Apple’s exodus from the router market, just as HomeKit becomes a thing. Having an Apple device at the heart of HomeKit should be the height of  that security “peace of mind” that Apple customers want.

    To enable consistent telework activity from locations throughout the house, I recently spent many hours trying to get a top-of-the-line Netgear range extender to supplement my AirPort Time Capsule router. It was an abject failure. Even a swapped-out replacement Netgear device ultimately wouldn’t broadcast a signal better than 10 MB/s. Seriously, it was inexplicably horrible. Netgear claimed its device would work with all routers, and advertised a simple setup procedure. Their setup app was glitchy and confusing, and their non-app browser-based setup interface wasn’t much better. Both the original device and its second-try replacement would take a good five or six minutes just to boot up to even start the process, and it would go downhill from there. 

    To the rescue was a friend’s surplussed AirPort Extreme router. About three minutes after plugging it in, I was up and running with an extension of my existing network, with the same high-bandwidth SSID connection throughout the house. Without a hitch, devices that would benefit from it automatically migrated over to the second router. It was the quintessential “it just works” Apple experience. Why they’ve abandoned that to third-party manufacturers, I do not know. I’ll be sticking with this set up as long as it keeps working and hope that Apple will eventually reconsider their decision. 


    Agreed (though I haven't always, unfortunately).

    I managed to find an Airport Express on eBay, but I got lucky.
    Airport Express has old slow N bands. Beside the airdrop ability, it sucks on everything. Extreme or Time Capsule may be a better option there. Still, their range is horrible compared to Eero. I just replaced my Time Capsule with Eero as an access point and my connection already covered both floor of the house with only single Eero. Adding a second Eero spread my full signal to the garage. I bridged the Time Capsule for network storage!
  • Reply 11 of 11
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    fallenjt said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    AppleZulu said:
    I am still baffled by Apple’s exodus from the router market, just as HomeKit becomes a thing. Having an Apple device at the heart of HomeKit should be the height of  that security “peace of mind” that Apple customers want.

    To enable consistent telework activity from locations throughout the house, I recently spent many hours trying to get a top-of-the-line Netgear range extender to supplement my AirPort Time Capsule router. It was an abject failure. Even a swapped-out replacement Netgear device ultimately wouldn’t broadcast a signal better than 10 MB/s. Seriously, it was inexplicably horrible. Netgear claimed its device would work with all routers, and advertised a simple setup procedure. Their setup app was glitchy and confusing, and their non-app browser-based setup interface wasn’t much better. Both the original device and its second-try replacement would take a good five or six minutes just to boot up to even start the process, and it would go downhill from there. 

    To the rescue was a friend’s surplussed AirPort Extreme router. About three minutes after plugging it in, I was up and running with an extension of my existing network, with the same high-bandwidth SSID connection throughout the house. Without a hitch, devices that would benefit from it automatically migrated over to the second router. It was the quintessential “it just works” Apple experience. Why they’ve abandoned that to third-party manufacturers, I do not know. I’ll be sticking with this set up as long as it keeps working and hope that Apple will eventually reconsider their decision. 


    Agreed (though I haven't always, unfortunately).

    I managed to find an Airport Express on eBay, but I got lucky.
    Airport Express has old slow N bands. Beside the airdrop ability, it sucks on everything. Extreme or Time Capsule may be a better option there. Still, their range is horrible compared to Eero. I just replaced my Time Capsule with Eero as an access point and my connection already covered both floor of the house with only single Eero. Adding a second Eero spread my full signal to the garage. I bridged the Time Capsule for network storage!

    It seems to me that, with WiFi, coverage is more important -- and a better predictor of speed -- than the type of WiFi.   Actually, who even needs a fast WiFi if it's driven by a sub-100Gb cable - unless you're doing a lot of in-house data transfers between machines?


    watto_cobra
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