Apple reportedly in negotiations to expand New York City office location

Posted:
in General Discussion
Apple is currently in talks with its New York City landlord to expand the office space it has in the city.

11 Penn Plaza in New York.
11 Penn Plaza in New York.


Earlier in 2020, Apple leased 220,000 square feet of office space at the 11 Penn Plaza building in Midtown. Now, the company is looking to expand.

According to Business Insider, Apple is negotiating with its landlords to add about 60,000 square feet to its existing 11 Penn Plaza office. Reportedly, there are options in the building for more space.

The talks are ongoing and there is "nothing concrete," meaning Apple may not yet have decided on the amount of office space or whether it wants to expand at all.

The Cupertino company's expansion in New York would join a growing tech industry footprint in the city over the past few years. Google and Facebook are currently the city's fifth- and sixth-largest office tenants, respectively.

Apple, for its part, has long had a smaller presence in Manhattan -- and the rumored 60,000 additional square feet is relatively modest among corporations of its size. Business Insider reports that Apple has been rumored to be ramping up its operations in Manhattan, however.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 14
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,586member
    Lots of cheap office space in NYC now since companies have discovered that employees can effectively work from home and new office space was overbuilt even before the pandemic. 

    If Apple can't negotiate cheap space there, no reason why they can't find cheap space elsewhere.   The advantage of that location is that it's directly across the street from Penn Station, so good for employees commuting from Long Island or New Jersey.   But there really aren't any decent restaurants or bars directly in that neighborhood. 

    One would think Apple would have wanted to be in a "hipper" place, like Soho or parts of Brooklyn.  

    AMC Networks is also in that building. 
    edited August 2020 tmay
  • Reply 2 of 14
    No matter how you slice it, Manhattan is a human ant hill.  One of my children and her spouse live within short walking distance from Central Park, but are afraid to leave their apartment after dusk. Transportation is  a crapshoot, and grocery shopping is a challenge. 

  • Reply 3 of 14
    I don’t have a lot of confidence in the long-term economic health of these large coastal cities. Apple should start moving facilities away from riot zones. There have been quite a few Apple Stores which have been completely looted over the past several months.
    Grayeagle
  • Reply 4 of 14
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 1,439member
    zoetmb said:
    Lots of cheap office space in NYC now since companies have discovered that employees can effectively work from home and new office space was overbuilt even before the pandemic. 

    If Apple can't negotiate cheap space there, no reason why they can't find cheap space elsewhere.   The advantage of that location is that it's directly across the street from Penn Station, so good for employees commuting from Long Island or New Jersey.   But there really aren't any decent restaurants or bars directly in that neighborhood. 

    One would think Apple would have wanted to be in a "hipper" place, like Soho or parts of Brooklyn.  

    AMC Networks is also in that building. 
    Businesses' are actually finding out the opposite to what your claim. People are also fed up with working from home, too many distractions and productivity is down. BTW there are no longer "hip" places in NYC, high real-estate put and end to art, music and culture here. What lille exist is not a neighbored which an Apple employee would "safe" in.  
  • Reply 5 of 14
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 1,439member

    I don’t have a lot of confidence in the long-term economic health of these large coastal cities. Apple should start moving facilities away from riot zones. There have been quite a few Apple Stores which have been completely looted over the past several months.
    You are such an *** if you believe the coastal cities have constant riots. Please never come to NY, and stay in your flyover state wallowing in fear and ignorance. 
    ndnyc
  • Reply 6 of 14
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 1,439member

    Grayeagle said:
    No matter how you slice it, Manhattan is a human ant hill.  One of my children and her spouse live within short walking distance from Central Park, but are afraid to leave their apartment after dusk. Transportation is  a crapshoot, and grocery shopping is a challenge. 

    That is an obvious lie, if they live that close to Central Park then they live in a multi-million dollar apartment and are wealthy. Nothing bad ever happens to rich people by the way. Why would you say something that you know is not true? Spread fear, ignorance, or just like to to say "they"?
    ndnyc
  • Reply 7 of 14
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 1,439member
    As a New Yorker, I wish Apple would stay in California and get out of NYC. We don't want Apple here. Big monopolistic corporations are bad for America and bad for NYC. My neighborhood's housing prices went through the roof when Facebook open offices nearby, this affected the price I pay for groceries, dinning out, and the explosion of stupid themed bars and other things the tech bros apparently think are cool. Apple stay in sunny CA, NYC will be too tough for you and we are just too racially and culturally diverse for you corporate types. 
    edited August 2020
  • Reply 8 of 14
    ndnycndnyc Posts: 17member
    spice-boy said:

    I don’t have a lot of confidence in the long-term economic health of these large coastal cities. Apple should start moving facilities away from riot zones. There have been quite a few Apple Stores which have been completely looted over the past several months.
    You are such an *** if you believe the coastal cities have constant riots. Please never come to NY, and stay in your flyover state wallowing in fear and ignorance. 
    He may not be an ***. He is certainly ignorant.
    spice-boy
  • Reply 9 of 14
    ndnycndnyc Posts: 17member
    As someone who’s lived in NYC for over 20 years, I can tell you whatever news source is telling you it’s a riot zone, has failed you. High achievers will always gravitate toward population centers NYC. And NYC has structural advantages that make it better able to survive and more quickly recover than perhaps any other city. Apple knows this even if people who don’t live here don’t.
    edited August 2020 spice-boy
  • Reply 10 of 14
    thrangthrang Posts: 893member
    The fact is many businesses have, or are in the process of, re-evaluating the benefit of being in a larger city. I work for a large (150k employee) multinational firm headquartered in NYC (actually they own several building outright, or lease multiple floors in about 15 locations in Manhattan) The process for virtual PC access for at least half the workforce is already underway. Space utilization will be cut significantly. My wife works in a smaller NYC-based firm, but all 30 people are remote and the ownership has all but stated this will be permanent.

    My son works with hundreds of businesses in NYC for auditing purposes, and all are now remote (understandably) -  but more than half will remain that way going forward.

    There are countless stories about the realities of this. Whether its rioting (real or perceived), COVID or whatever combination of factors (certainly city leadership has been atrocious), when people not only start to evaluate alternatives, but actually put them into practice, mindsets change. 

    So once commercial real estate begins to drop, supporting businesses (those that have even survived the prolonged shutdown), will also begin to close... residential real estate will also be impacted commensurately... efforts to tax even more will only drive higher income people out even faster (as will the natural relocation of businesses regardless)... and the net loss to the city (and many other) may very well be deep and long lasting.

    For many, there is no personal benefit being in a big city. Compared to surrounding suburbia, they are intensely crowded, relatively dirty, lack sky and greens, are more expensive to shop or dine, and waste tremendous time and personal energy to commute to and from (my wife and I save 10 hours A WEEK each not commuting)

    Yes, entertainment, museums, etc are in the cities. In the larger picture, so what. If they still can survive, one can always visit the three or four times a year you might partake in the arts. That has no bearing on working or living there.
    edited August 2020 SpamSandwich
  • Reply 11 of 14
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,408member
    ndnyc said:
    As someone who’s lived in NYC for over 20 years, I can tell you whatever news source is telling you it’s a riot zone, has failed you. High achievers will always gravitate toward population centers NYC. And NYC has structural advantages that make it better able to survive and more quickly recover than perhaps any other city. Apple knows this even if people who don’t live here don’t.
    Please. Everyone has seen the non-politically biased video of stores being looted, luxury car thefts and buildings now being completely boarded up in the downtown area. The rioting isn’t “non-stop” but it has led to an unprecedented number of people and businesses fleeing the city and the state.
    edited August 2020 Grayeagle
  • Reply 12 of 14
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 1,439member
    ndnyc said:
    As someone who’s lived in NYC for over 20 years, I can tell you whatever news source is telling you it’s a riot zone, has failed you. High achievers will always gravitate toward population centers NYC. And NYC has structural advantages that make it better able to survive and more quickly recover than perhaps any other city. Apple knows this even if people who don’t live here don’t.
    Please. Everyone has seen the non-politically biased video of stores being looted, luxury car thefts and buildings now being completely boarded up in the downtown area. The rioting isn’t “non-stop” but it has led to an unprecedented number of people and businesses fleeing the city and the state.
    Dude I have lived in NYC for 40 years, I assume you don't. There were a few nights when windows were smashed in big expensive luxury  stores, it was predictable. Those shops kept the wood panels in place since they having already been closed months earlier due to the pandemic, not because those of few bad nights. The kind of people that always take advantage of situations like these acted as expected. 

    Regarding "feeing the city" the pandemic gave some people that final push to leave and I bet they were contemplating it before the pandemic hit. My client's who are all wealthy headed to one of their country homes or to places like Hawaii, they did not sell their Manhattan property I can assure you. The same kind of people that fled NYC soon after the WTC attacks are leaving now as well. NYC is not a factory town which everyone abandons when the one employers shuts down. This city has endurance, New Yorkers love their city, those leaving now should probably never lived here anyway. 
    Grayeagle
  • Reply 13 of 14
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 1,439member
    thrang said:
    The fact is many businesses have, or are in the process of, re-evaluating the benefit of being in a larger city. I work for a large (150k employee) multinational firm headquartered in NYC (actually they own several building outright, or lease multiple floors in about 15 locations in Manhattan) The process for virtual PC access for at least half the workforce is already underway. Space utilization will be cut significantly. My wife works in a smaller NYC-based firm, but all 30 people are remote and the ownership has all but stated this will be permanent.

    My son works with hundreds of businesses in NYC for auditing purposes, and all are now remote (understandably) -  but more than half will remain that way going forward.

    There are countless stories about the realities of this. Whether its rioting (real or perceived), COVID or whatever combination of factors (certainly city leadership has been atrocious), when people not only start to evaluate alternatives, but actually put them into practice, mindsets change. 

    So once commercial real estate begins to drop, supporting businesses (those that have even survived the prolonged shutdown), will also begin to close... residential real estate will also be impacted commensurately... efforts to tax even more will only drive higher income people out even faster (as will the natural relocation of businesses regardless)... and the net loss to the city (and many other) may very well be deep and long lasting.

    For many, there is no personal benefit being in a big city. Compared to surrounding suburbia, they are intensely crowded, relatively dirty, lack sky and greens, are more expensive to shop or dine, and waste tremendous time and personal energy to commute to and from (my wife and I save 10 hours A WEEK each not commuting)

    Yes, entertainment, museums, etc are in the cities. In the larger picture, so what. If they still can survive, one can always visit the three or four times a year you might partake in the arts. That has no bearing on working or living there.
    Let me break that down for you. Those large businesses re-thinking their NYC strategy were not here 20 years ago. We didn't have big chain stores or national chain restaurants, even Mc Donalds had only a handful of stores here back then. All that change with the WTC attacks and the election of Bloomberg who made NYC a lot more attractive to corporations after his campaign to sanitize our city. Along with all that terrible corporate crap came American tourists who for the first time in my lifetime felt NY wanted them there. Times Sq became Disney land now that all the adult entertainment had been removed, our latest tourists magnet and source of their sympathy became "9-11-land" or ground zero a lame term for a tragedy which created the longest war in American history. 

    We love our so called dirt, our crowed neighborhoods, we don't fear our neighbors as most Americans do, we don't all have an arsenal of guys like those suburbanites who always think someone is out to get them. People are what has made NYC one of the greatest cities in the world not shopping at A&F, Victoria's Secret which can be found in any depressing suburban mall. So please don't bother to visit us when this pandemic is over, I for one enjoyed only seeing fellow New Yorkers these past several months than people from the most mediocre parts of this coun
    Grayeagle
  • Reply 14 of 14
    thrangthrang Posts: 893member
    spice-boy said:
    thrang said:
    The fact is many businesses have, or are in the process of, re-evaluating the benefit of being in a larger city. I work for a large (150k employee) multinational firm headquartered in NYC (actually they own several building outright, or lease multiple floors in about 15 locations in Manhattan) The process for virtual PC access for at least half the workforce is already underway. Space utilization will be cut significantly. My wife works in a smaller NYC-based firm, but all 30 people are remote and the ownership has all but stated this will be permanent.

    My son works with hundreds of businesses in NYC for auditing purposes, and all are now remote (understandably) -  but more than half will remain that way going forward.

    There are countless stories about the realities of this. Whether its rioting (real or perceived), COVID or whatever combination of factors (certainly city leadership has been atrocious), when people not only start to evaluate alternatives, but actually put them into practice, mindsets change. 

    So once commercial real estate begins to drop, supporting businesses (those that have even survived the prolonged shutdown), will also begin to close... residential real estate will also be impacted commensurately... efforts to tax even more will only drive higher income people out even faster (as will the natural relocation of businesses regardless)... and the net loss to the city (and many other) may very well be deep and long lasting.

    For many, there is no personal benefit being in a big city. Compared to surrounding suburbia, they are intensely crowded, relatively dirty, lack sky and greens, are more expensive to shop or dine, and waste tremendous time and personal energy to commute to and from (my wife and I save 10 hours A WEEK each not commuting)

    Yes, entertainment, museums, etc are in the cities. In the larger picture, so what. If they still can survive, one can always visit the three or four times a year you might partake in the arts. That has no bearing on working or living there.
    Let me break that down for you. Those large businesses re-thinking their NYC strategy were not here 20 years ago. We didn't have big chain stores or national chain restaurants, even Mc Donalds had only a handful of stores here back then. All that change with the WTC attacks and the election of Bloomberg who made NYC a lot more attractive to corporations after his campaign to sanitize our city. Along with all that terrible corporate crap came American tourists who for the first time in my lifetime felt NY wanted them there. Times Sq became Disney land now that all the adult entertainment had been removed, our latest tourists magnet and source of their sympathy became "9-11-land" or ground zero a lame term for a tragedy which created the longest war in American history. 

    We love our so called dirt, our crowed neighborhoods, we don't fear our neighbors as most Americans do, we don't all have an arsenal of guys like those suburbanites who always think someone is out to get them. People are what has made NYC one of the greatest cities in the world not shopping at A&F, Victoria's Secret which can be found in any depressing suburban mall. So please don't bother to visit us when this pandemic is over, I for one enjoyed only seeing fellow New Yorkers these past several months than people from the most mediocre parts of this coun
    I'm guessing you don't realize how poorly thought out this is... but to take a walk down one crooked path.... Giuliani deserves the lion's share of credit cleaning up and reinveting the city given the condition it was in, and Bloomberg largely continued this. But heavy lifting was under Giuliani. And both had strong police commissioners that didn't let lawlessness impact the hard-working citizenry and businesses they are sworn to protect.

    But if you want to talk about mayoral activities, continue on to DeBlasio (or as he is referred to by many I know that live in NYC, DeBoz-io). It is both outrageous and sad how he is letting the city return to the 70's and wiping out the progress made by Giuliani and Bloomberg.

    The rioting and looting that has been permitted over the past months would have been squelched quickly and properly under either of them I think. Because there is NO legitimate basis for permitting what occurred. That's not protesting.

    edited August 2020
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