Apple's Mac sees strong growth amid coronavirus-fueled PC market boom

Posted:
in General Discussion edited October 2020
Apple's Mac segment grew nearly 39% year-over-year in the third quarter of 2020 amid double-digit growth across the broader PC market.

Credit: Andrew O'Hara, AppleInsider
Credit: Andrew O'Hara, AppleInsider


As consumers and businesses switch to remote education and work during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, research firm IDC estimates that global PC shipments grew 14.6% in Q3 2020 and reached 81.3 million units shipped.

The research firm also estimates that Apple shipped 6.89 million macOS devices during the quarter, up from 4.59 million units in the year-ago quarter. That represents year-over-year growth of 38.9%, IDC's estimates show.

"Consumer demand and institutional demand approached record levels in some cases," IDC Research Manager Jitesh
Ubrani said. "Had the market not been hampered by component shortages, notebook shipments would have soared even higher during the third quarter as market appetite was yet unsatiated."

Apple's market share also grew slightly during the same period. In Q3 2020, Apple had an 8.5% share of the market, up from 7% in Q3 2019. Apple ranks as the fourth largest PC maker, behind Lenovo, HP and Dell but ahead of Acer.

IDC estimates that Lenovo shipped 19.2 million units in Q3 2020; HP shipped 18.6 million units; Dell shipped 11.9 million units; and Acer, in fifth place, shipped 6 million units.

Growth was similar across most markets in region, with strong single-digit growth in Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Europe. In Latin America, the traditional PC market posted double-digit growth for the first time in five years.

In the U.S., the traditional PC market saw an "extraordinary quarter posing strong double-digit shipment growth" fueled by stay-at-home orders and inventory replenishment. But while notebooks saw their shipments strengthened, the desktop market declined slightly year-over-year.

Throughout the quarter, IDC suggests that shortages of critical components led to a backlog of orders and a "missed opportunity" for many PC makers.

"The PC industry rode into the third quarter with a sizable backlog of unfulfilled orders," said Linn Huang, IDC research vice president of Devices and Displays. "And it appears the quarter will end under the same auspices. Given that the shortages have been due more to a shortfall of business planning than a technical glitch, we do not anticipate a sudden surge in capacity. Consequently, this backlog will likely carry into 2021."

Update: Gartner has also released PC shipment estimates for the third quarter, showing an uptick of 3.6% on strong growth from front-runner Lenovo. Apple ranked fourth with 5.5 million Mac shipments, up 7.3% on the year.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 2,917member
    Wait until Apple Silicon based MACs start rolling out. Apple wants more PC market share which helps drive services revenue.
  • Reply 2 of 12
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,917member
    Hey remember when people said Apple gear was too expensive to survive the pandemic? Oops. 
    razorpit
  • Reply 3 of 12
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,917member
    wood1208 said:
    Wait until Apple Silicon based MACs start rolling out. Apple wants more PC market share which helps drive services revenue.
    So, all these years later, why do you spell Macs with incorrect case? It isn't an acronym, it's just short for Macintosh
  • Reply 4 of 12
    Just wait until Apple Silicon Macs hit their stride.  I believe Mac laptop sales will go through the roof if they have the processing power of a six-core i7 and can get 15 to 20 hours of use on a charge.  It seems as though the pandemic is going to last well into next year so Apple Silicon laptops will likely be a strong revenue factor.  Hopefully, Apple sells Apple Silicon MacBooks for a decent price below $1000.  Apple could theoretically cut into the market of cheap Chromebooks and those low-cost Wintel laptops, but maybe that's just wishful thinking on my part.
    edited October 2020
  • Reply 5 of 12
    Hopefully performance goes through the roof. But prices to the floor? Apple? Compete with Chromebooks and cheap laptops cutting on price? As an Apple user I hope to see that but, as an Apple observer and investor I have some doubts ... 
    elijahgrotateleftbytemuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 6 of 12
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,774member
    Apple's Mac segment grew nearly 39% year-over-year in the third quarter of 2020 amid double-digit growth across the broader PC market.

    Not sure if this is due to lack of data from IDC, or subterfuge by AI, but "double digit growth" is ridiculously broad. Presumably "across the broader PC market" means the growth of the PC market as a whole. If it does, it could could mean the overall PC market grew 10% and therefore Apple did great by growing 39%, or the market could have grown by 99% and Apple did terribly. Which is it?
  • Reply 7 of 12
    elijahg said:
    Apple's Mac segment grew nearly 39% year-over-year in the third quarter of 2020 amid double-digit growth across the broader PC market.

    Not sure if this is due to lack of data from IDC, or subterfuge by AI, but "double digit growth" is ridiculously broad. Presumably "across the broader PC market" means the growth of the PC market as a whole. If it does, it could could mean the overall PC market grew 10% and therefore Apple did great by growing 39%, or the market could have grown by 99% and Apple did terribly. Which is it?
    IDC says market growth 14.6% in 2020 Q3.
    elijahg
  • Reply 8 of 12
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,774member
    Lordhan said:
    elijahg said:
    Apple's Mac segment grew nearly 39% year-over-year in the third quarter of 2020 amid double-digit growth across the broader PC market.

    Not sure if this is due to lack of data from IDC, or subterfuge by AI, but "double digit growth" is ridiculously broad. Presumably "across the broader PC market" means the growth of the PC market as a whole. If it does, it could could mean the overall PC market grew 10% and therefore Apple did great by growing 39%, or the market could have grown by 99% and Apple did terribly. Which is it?
    IDC says market growth 14.6% in 2020 Q3.
    Thanks, then the Mac is doing well! There was no link to the IDC study in the article.
  • Reply 9 of 12
    Hopefully performance goes through the roof. But prices to the floor? Apple? Compete with Chromebooks and cheap laptops cutting on price? As an Apple user I hope to see that but, as an Apple observer and investor I have some doubts ... 
    this. 

    Apple chargesover a thousand bucks for a PHONE! 
    ifthe M series chips outperform intel i9 series, Apple May well charge MORE for Macs. 
    And it would be unfortunate for us as consumers,yet totally justified. 
    Faster computing than anywhere else plus better battery life and perhaps special features? 
    That’s best in class premium computing. 
    AApple is going to likely either keep prices the same or slightly raise them
    the cash they save compared to paying intel will pas the famous Apple profit margin and stocks will soar yet again. 
    razorpit
  • Reply 10 of 12
    Just wait until Apple Silicon Macs hit their stride.  I believe Mac laptop sales will go through the roof if they have the processing power of a six-core i7 and can get 15 to 20 hours of use on a charge.  It seems as though the pandemic is going to last well into next year so Apple Silicon laptops will likely be a strong revenue factor.  Hopefully, Apple sells Apple Silicon MacBooks for a decent price below $1000.  Apple could theoretically cut into the market of cheap Chromebooks and those low-cost Wintel laptops, but maybe that's just wishful thinking on my part.
    It is wishful thinking on your part.

    1. An 11 inch iPad Pro with 256 GB of storage costs $899. If you have a case for a MacBook Air being less, make it. An entry level MacBook Air doesn't need a "Pro" chip? Fine ... a 256 GB MacBook Air costs $750. And remember: iPads don't have keyboards.

    2. You presume that macOS is as popular - and Windows as unpopular - with the general populace as it is with Apple fans. Or that this same general populace is so enamored with Apple's engineering and product design that they will run out and get a new computer just because it has the same general CPU in it that an iPhone or iPad has. There is ... no basis for this presumption. Even if there were some basis for the presumption other factors - an entry level Mac will still cost twice as much as an entry level Lenovo, Dell or HP while not being able to run nearly as much software and will require learning an entirely new OS - would inhibit it.

    ARM-based Macs is a huge deal ... for people who already exclusively buy Macs and other Apple products already. The rest ... well ask them if their computer's CPU and GPU were made by Intel, AMD or Nvidia, and whether their hard drive is SSD. What percentage of them would be able to tell you? (Note: this applies to most Mac owners too.)
    razorpitmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 11 of 12
    A huge discrepancy between Gartner and IDC. Guess one will have to wait until October 29th to find the truth.
  • Reply 12 of 12
    Apple chargesover a thousand bucks for a PHONE! 
    ifthe M series chips outperform intel i9 series, Apple May well charge MORE for Macs. 
    And it would be unfortunate for us as consumers,yet totally justified. 
    Faster computing than anywhere else plus better battery life and perhaps special features? 
    That’s best in class premium computing. 
    AApple is going to likely either keep prices the same or slightly raise them
    the cash they save compared to paying intel will pas the famous Apple profit margin and stocks will soar yet again. 
    With the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra starting at $1400, the cost of Apple phones should no longer be an issue.

    People who are convinced that Apple is paying Intel all this money are going to be disappointed. The Intel Core i3 costs Apple less than $50 and the Intel Core i5 less than $100. While the i7, i9 and Xeon cost a bit more - and even better they will no longer need to buy AMD GPUs for those models -  Apple sells far less of those (Mac Pros, iMacs, top end MacBook Pros) than they do the entry level and midrange MacBook Air and MacBook Pro devices that contain the i3 and i5. The same 10th gen Intel Core i3 that is in a $1000 MacBook Air is in a $450 Inspiron or IdeaPad (with the same specs). Whoever Apple is paying all this money too, it isn't Intel so save the dreams of increased margins and stock prices.
    rotateleftbytemuthuk_vanalingam
Sign In or Register to comment.