The real story behind MagSafe, USB-C PD, and why you need a 20W AC charger

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 43
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 3,065member
    1. MagSafe is heavy/clunky. Where are the demos showing how the phone was saved from damage by MagSafe breaking away? LOL
    2. Use the bundled, lightweight Lightning cable instead for faster charging.
    3. Use Qi for slower charging and extend the useful life of the battery
    4. Article seems longer than necessary
    5. Looking forward to seeing which chargers are PD 3.0
  • Reply 42 of 43
    tht said:
    MplsP said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    After reading two pages of this, I ordered another lightning cable. 
    I agree - I’ve never been a great fan of wireless charging. Slower, finicky, more prone to errors and it wastes power. Lightning cables are easy and reliable. Is it really that hard to plug in a lightning cable?
    It's like every other feature. If you find MagSafe convenient, it's worthwhile. So people, who have a desk job can have an inductive charging mat at their desks, and just keep their phones on it during the whole work day, and essentially have a fully charged phone for the evening. It really doesn't need to be fast for a use case like this. 2 to 3 Watts is basically all that is needed. Like with AirPods, not having a cord when you are continually picking up and putting down your phone should feel better to use for most people.

    MagSafe is like the Apple Watch magnetically latched inductive charger, but a little more evolved. Use your phone the whole day, charge while sleeping. The magnets will ensure optimal placement for inductive charging. You don't need a lot of power in this scenario either. 5 Watts will be fine. Well, it really should be the maximum power usage of the phone, so, something like 8 Watts, for people who are using their phone while charging, but Apple doesn't think this is too big of a market to address as the MagSafe charger has a short cable.

    On the other hand, if a phone lasts the whole day, a cable will be perfectly fine, and they'd be fine with a 5W charger, charging overnight. Yup. Perfectly fine, and probably the best way for most people.

    The fast charging, wired or inductive, is really only for a niche of people who use their phone hours on end, who don't charge daily, or is in a situation where they are using moe power than average, like by in a poor cellular coverage area. Would like to hear more from people on why they need to charge their phone so fast, and how they get to the point of needing to do that.
    This response finally gets to the obvious point for folks that aren't seeing this as an opportunity to discuss complicated theories about charging devices.  Why is this "solution" to a problem that doesn't exist being sold as a "revolution"?  So called "wireless" charging isn't wireless, at all.  There is still s brick, a cable, and a usually large device or pad for the charging.  There IS a wire, and much more hardware to sit on your desk or carry in order to conduct the "wireless" charging.  As described by the previous post, it should be a niche market for folks who want to set their device on a desk or table while they work, and find this more convenient than a simple plug in.  

    Other than that, its an example of developing a market to sell more hardware where there is little real justification for it.  Wireless earbuds? Yes.  Those are an improvement, and there is NO wire, folks.  Wireless charging? No real improvement, and there IS a wire, and much more junk on the desk.  

    This is pure marketing.  Why fall for it? Why spend a lot of time arguing about the fine details?  It's fun for some, but to me its a waste of time.  If you buy it, its a waste of $.
  • Reply 43 of 43
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    EJSea said:
    tht said:
    MplsP said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    After reading two pages of this, I ordered another lightning cable. 
    I agree - I’ve never been a great fan of wireless charging. Slower, finicky, more prone to errors and it wastes power. Lightning cables are easy and reliable. Is it really that hard to plug in a lightning cable?
    It's like every other feature. If you find MagSafe convenient, it's worthwhile. So people, who have a desk job can have an inductive charging mat at their desks, and just keep their phones on it during the whole work day, and essentially have a fully charged phone for the evening. It really doesn't need to be fast for a use case like this. 2 to 3 Watts is basically all that is needed. Like with AirPods, not having a cord when you are continually picking up and putting down your phone should feel better to use for most people.

    MagSafe is like the Apple Watch magnetically latched inductive charger, but a little more evolved. Use your phone the whole day, charge while sleeping. The magnets will ensure optimal placement for inductive charging. You don't need a lot of power in this scenario either. 5 Watts will be fine. Well, it really should be the maximum power usage of the phone, so, something like 8 Watts, for people who are using their phone while charging, but Apple doesn't think this is too big of a market to address as the MagSafe charger has a short cable.

    On the other hand, if a phone lasts the whole day, a cable will be perfectly fine, and they'd be fine with a 5W charger, charging overnight. Yup. Perfectly fine, and probably the best way for most people.

    The fast charging, wired or inductive, is really only for a niche of people who use their phone hours on end, who don't charge daily, or is in a situation where they are using moe power than average, like by in a poor cellular coverage area. Would like to hear more from people on why they need to charge their phone so fast, and how they get to the point of needing to do that.
    This response finally gets to the obvious point for folks that aren't seeing this as an opportunity to discuss complicated theories about charging devices.  Why is this "solution" to a problem that doesn't exist being sold as a "revolution"?  So called "wireless" charging isn't wireless, at all.  There is still s brick, a cable, and a usually large device or pad for the charging.  There IS a wire, and much more hardware to sit on your desk or carry in order to conduct the "wireless" charging.  As described by the previous post, it should be a niche market for folks who want to set their device on a desk or table while they work, and find this more convenient than a simple plug in.  

    Other than that, its an example of developing a market to sell more hardware where there is little real justification for it.  Wireless earbuds? Yes.  Those are an improvement, and there is NO wire, folks.  Wireless charging? No real improvement, and there IS a wire, and much more junk on the desk.  

    This is pure marketing.  Why fall for it? Why spend a lot of time arguing about the fine details?  It's fun for some, but to me its a waste of time.  If you buy it, its a waste of $.
    This is the way I see just about every wireless phone charger in existence, and this is no different. There is still a cable connecting your phone the power point; the only difference is that a tiny convenient (for most people, I'll get to that in a bit) plug has been replaced by a plastic pancake that adds an order of magnitude more bulk than the lightning cable. 

    There is one advantage though: people with disabilities may find it much easier to use the MagSafe cable than trying to plug a tiny connector into a tiny socket, which is fair enough.

    But this is not wireless. If I charge the phone by placing it close to my laptop with nothing connecting them, then that's wireless. I don't have a problem snapping a cable into a socket so I don't see the point.
    edited November 2020
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