Apple again bars sideloading of iOS apps on M1 Macs

Posted:
in macOS edited February 9
Apple with the latest macOS Big Sur release has blocked sideloading of iOS apps on Macs running M1 chips, again preventing users from installing iPhone and iPad apps on its desktop operating system.

M1


The tech giant first constructed hurdles against sideloading in January with server-side protections barring manual installs of iOS and iPadOS apps. Lifted four days later, the ban was expected to see reinstatement with the release of a subsequent macOS update.

As noted by 9to5Mac, the latest version of Big Sur 11.2, issued last week, again activates the server-side block. Further tests show the sideloading policy extends to the current macOS 11.3 beta.

Apple's M1 chip shares an architecture with the company's A-series silicon, making it relatively simple to run existing iOS apps on the desktop platform. Developers who do not wish to distribute their wares on macOS, whether it be for technical or marketing reasons, can opt out of presenting software on the Mac App Store.

Users eager to access popular iOS apps like Facebook, Instagram and Netflix on macOS discovered a workaround that involved downloading and installing IPA files. Apple's server-side restriction renders that process ineffective.

Attempting to install an IPA file now triggers a warning message that reads, "This application cannot be installed because the developer did not intend for it to run on this platform."

Apple has not issued an official comment on sideloading iOS apps on M1 Macs, though it appears that the new policy against such action is permanent.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 15
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 5,486member
    Attempting to install an IPA file now triggers a warning message that reads, "This application cannot be installed because the developer did not intend for it to run on this platform."


    People complaining about this are just being entitled children upset that their parents aren't letting them eat candy before finishing their supper.

    If/When Apple comes up with a system to install iOS apps on MacOS, it will be when the details and the wishes of the DEVELOPERS are adhered to.  
    Fidonet127n2itivguyMacProwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 15
    jdwjdw Posts: 932member
    I disagree profoundly with @sflocal .  Bashing your fellow Mac users as "entitled children" is flat out wrong, regardless of your fellowing Mac users wanting to side-load or not. It's absolutely ridiculous that some of us (not me, because I don't own an M1 Mac) want to side load and therefore complain merely about the STATE OF SOFTWARE BARRIERS, only to have status quo worshippers who lack tact jump in and throw verbal punches at their FELLOW MAC USERS.  Which is worse?  Complaining about OBJECTS like software or complaining about other PEOPLE?  Answer: complaining about other people is worse, especially when those people want little more than some basic freedoms in the software they own and use.

    I appreciated very much what Jason Snell wrote recently in one of my Macworld issues.  While he did appeal for patience on the part of M1 users who would love to side load apps they've paid for, he also appealed to developers to err on the side of freedom, or at least invest more time in making their apps work better on the Mac if indeed they feel they have legitimate reasons for blocking side loading for now.

    The fact is, side-loading is part of the fun of using Apple Silicon in these early days of the chips.  We all know such fun eventually gets crushed, but this is quite early in the game, and in my opinion too early.  Let M1 users have some fun.
    edited February 9 larryamuthuk_vanalingamargonautdavgregdarkvadergc_uk
  • Reply 3 of 15
    jimh2jimh2 Posts: 320member
    Side loading can be theft if you have not paid for desktop version. Respect the software developers by not stepping all over their rights. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 15
    I find this really interesting, because as of yesterday I downloaded an iOS app onto my M1 MacBook Pro. As I type this I currently have it up and its working fine.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 15
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 17,394member
    jimh2 said:
    Side loading can be theft if you have not paid for desktop version. Respect the software developers by not stepping all over their rights. 
    That's utterly absurd.  No one is going to circumvent buying a desktop version of an iOS app.  We're talking about people who want to play Boom Beach on their Mac.  The whole prohibition is pointless.  It's just appeasing developers who have other beefs with Apple.  Apple gets to say "we're honoring the developers' wishes."  That's all it's about.
    darkvaderasdasdwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 15
    This is my question:
    I have both a Mac mini and MacBook Air with Apple Silicon and the iOS apps a offered for install via the Mac App Store are not the same. There are some that appear on one and not the other.

    Since they both are specced  the same they should both offer the same apps, right?

    And as far as whining by developers, Apple should clearly show on the iOS App Store if the app runs on the Mac. Either develop Mac apps or let your iOS apps run on Apple Silicon Macs. eero comes to mind…

    Some of us do not want to set up and run our networks from iOS.

    edited February 10 watto_cobraDetnator
  • Reply 7 of 15
    jimh2 said:
    Side loading can be theft if you have not paid for desktop version. Respect the software developers by not stepping all over their rights. 

    That's idiotic.  If you bought the app the developer should not have ANY say in what hardware you run it on.


  • Reply 8 of 15
    I find this really interesting, because as of yesterday I downloaded an iOS app onto my M1 MacBook Pro. As I type this I currently have it up and its working fine.
    If you downloaded it from the App store then you didn't side load the app. Downloading from the App Store is a normal process and is not affected. Side loading is a bizarre workaround where you backup the app from the iphone or iPad and then you can install it. If you download from the App Store you will get automatic updates. If you side loaded, then you have to keep using the work around to keep your apps up to date. Side loading is a pain.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 15
    darkvader said:
    jimh2 said:
    Side loading can be theft if you have not paid for desktop version. Respect the software developers by not stepping all over their rights. 

    That's idiotic.  If you bought the app the developer should not have ANY say in what hardware you run it on.


    You didn't "Buy" the app.  You licensed the app and agreed to the developers license agreement at purchase.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 15

    I find this really interesting, because as of yesterday I downloaded an iOS app onto my M1 MacBook Pro. As I type this I currently have it up and its working fine.
    Yep, but only the apps that the iOS/iPadOS developers have allowed to be installed on M1 Macs can be installed.  

    Prior to macOS 11.2, you could load ANY iOS/iPadOS app on an M1 Mac, even if the developer did not allow it. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 15
    It would have been better if this was implemented at launch. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 15
    I find this decision to be VERY concerning. Right now with Intel macs you can "Side load" any mac program you download from the web. You can even load windows programs with wine/crossover. But on Apple M1 Apple is going to GREAT length to block the loading of iOS apps that presumably you bought. Even if you did pirate/steal a program. Apple is not going to any great length to block. this behavior on Intel mac. Why do this with the M1 (arm) mac. I find this concerning. The fact of the matter is, I payed Apple for an M1 computer, this computer is mine I own is and I should be able to decide what I want to run on it. I am not leasing the computer from Apple it is my computer, license terms or not. I don't see Microsoft or any Linux distro team making it harder to run software from "side loading" This type of behavior will drive people away from the apple platform. I was concerned about this when Apple announced this transition to the ARM architecture. Apple is proving my point, some time in the future we will need to jailbreak out Mac desktop or laptop computers to run anything outside of the Mac app store. Then Mac OS will become nothing more the iOS with a finder GUI on the top of it. Apple fighting SO had to block iOS apps is a prime example of this.
  • Reply 13 of 15
    But on Apple M1 Apple is going to GREAT length to block the loading of **1**iOS apps that presumably you bought. Even if you did pirate/steal a program. Apple is not going to any great length to block. this behavior on Intel mac. Why do this with the M1 (arm) mac. I find this concerning. The fact of the matter is, I payed Apple for an M1 computer, this computer is mine I own is and **2**I should be able to decide what I want to run on it. I am not leasing the computer from Apple it is my computer, license terms or not. **3**I don't see Microsoft or any Linux distro team making it harder to run software from "side loading" **4**This type of behavior will drive people away from the apple platform. I was concerned about this when Apple announced this transition to the ARM architecture. **5**Apple is proving my point, some time in the future we will need to jailbreak out Mac desktop or laptop computers to run anything outside of the Mac app store. Then Mac OS will become nothing more the iOS with a finder GUI on the top of it. Apple fighting SO had to block iOS apps is a prime example of this.
    No, **1**you didn't buy it. You licensed it.

    First off, a vendor who doesn't want an app to run on a given platform could have added code that limits their app to specific platforms, and doesn't need Apple's help. So I am prepared to criticize developers who are too stupid to properly code.

    Furthermore, if Apple's App Store guidelines (and its past statements to developers) are written properly, Apple would have the right to allow side-loading. However I can see that Apple would hesitate to allow side loading because lots of apps would behave poorly and that would make both Apple and the developers look bad. Maybe Apple has a plan to allow side-loading once the bugs are worked out. Do you have any problem with Apple working out bugs before they release software? How do you know Apple will never support side-loading? Can you cite your source?

    You can already run whatever you want on your Mac**2** if you install Windows or Linux on it. Those OSs don't have walled gardens so they must make you very happy. Have you been complaining at all about the fact that Apple doesn't support the OpenGL API on Macs? If not, you're a hypocrite. If you are complaining about that, explain your reason that Apple should not be allowed to do choose to not support it.

    Were you angry when Apple decided not to support Flash? What was your rationale for forcing Apple to support it?

    So just because Microsoft provides a service**3**, you expect that Apple should be forced to do the same thing?

    So now you're complaining that **4**because it's a bad business decision, Apple shouldn't be allowed to do it. Can you list any other companies that have made bad business decisions that you want to stop them from doing business? Do you want to force GM to stop selling Hummers?

    So now you're saying that because **5**Apple may do something in the future that will offend you, Apple needs to be stopped now!?!

    You repeat yourself over and over that Apple is making bad business decisions. So what? Do you want veto power over any company that makes a bad business decision? Are you the world's dictator? Do you like dictatorships? Move to China.
  • Reply 14 of 15
    Sure, spend a ton of your hard earned money on a computer, just so we can tell you what to do on it!
    Then we’ll tell you that decision is in your best interest and has nothing to do with our revenue stream.
    Next stop, you can only install apps from the Mac App Store. For your best interest of course!
    You don’t actually own the device, we just let you use it!
  • Reply 15 of 15
    Barring people from side loading never stopped anyone. Just look at the home-brew communities on gaming consoles. This clearly isn't going to stop piracy. It will however, frustrate a lot of actual users, hoping to be able to run iOS apps on he Mac.
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