TikTok sale to U.S. company unlikely to happen under Biden administration

Posted:
in General Discussion
Plans to force the sale of TikTok's American operation to Walmart Inc. and Oracle Corp. seems unlikely to happen, as President Biden reviews the app's risk to national security.




The Biden administration has begun looking into President Trump's long-waged war against the popular video app, TikTok. Currently, there are no concrete plans for resolving issues that the previous administration deemed dire.

"We plan to develop a comprehensive approach to securing U.S. data that addresses the full range of threats we face," National Security Council spokeswoman Emily Horne said, as reported by the Wall Street Journal. "This includes the risk posed by Chinese apps and other software that operate in the U.S. In the coming months, we expect to review specific cases in light of a comprehensive understanding of the risks we face."

Trump had long rallied against TikTok's parent company, China-based ByteDance, stating that the popular video app was a threat to American Data.

ByteDance has reiterated that the Chinese government has no access to American users' data, despite The Trump administration's allegations.

Trump's solution was to push ByteDance into selling its American operations to a U.S.-owned entity, such as Walmart, Oracle, or Microsoft, or ban the service within the U.S.

Despite the Trump administration's efforts to force the sale by September 20, 2020, the ban deadline was pushed back multiple times.

In November, the U.S. Commerce Department that it wouldn't enforce an order to shut down TikTok, and ultimately the ban never went into effect.

In December, it was reported that TikTok would not be given a new deadline or be banned, but instead, the situation would be maintained. The limbo would continue while TikTok talks to the U.S. government about a sale that would satisfy the Trump administration's concerns.

The Trump administration made one final effort in December to appeal U.S. District Court Judge Carl Nichols injunction that prohibited the Department of Commerce from imposing rules which restrict internet carriers from handling the social media service's data.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 7
    What "threat to American data" could it be? Doesn't iOS basically keep apps from reading other apps' data? The only things it would be able to "steal" are videos that people actually post.
    darkvaderlkruppGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 2 of 7
    darkvaderdarkvader Posts: 1,146member
    Given how trustworthy Walmart, Oracle, and Microsloth are, we're better off with ByteDance.
    GeorgeBMacchasm
  • Reply 3 of 7
    badmonkbadmonk Posts: 1,304member
    Actually the ByteDance Trump spat was always more likely related to his embarrassment at the hands of TikTok users and the theoretical than any real data privacy issue.  I suspect FaceBooks exploitation of American data is much much worse, this decision of putting the issue in more context makes sense.
    ciaCloudTalkinOferroundaboutnowviclauyycGeorgeBMacchasm
  • Reply 4 of 7
    ciacia Posts: 260member
    badmonk said:
    Actually the ByteDance Trump spat was always more likely related to his embarrassment at the hands of TikTok users and the theoretical than any real data privacy issue.  I suspect FaceBooks exploitation of American data is much much worse, this decision of putting the issue in more context makes sense.
    Ding ding ding!  We have a winner.  Trump was so embarrassed by all the tik tok teens "snatching" up millions of tickets to that pathetic COVID super-spreader rally in Tulsa, OK. (Remember? The one that killed Herman Cain?)

    Trump's bruised ego was the only real threat to TIk Tok.
    OferroundaboutnowviclauyycGeorgeBMacchasm
  • Reply 5 of 7
    No American company was ever going to have to buy TikTok and the company was never in danger of being banned imo.  What we witnessed was an example of a toddler being told "in a minute" until they finally fell asleep, or in the case of Trump, the inevitable loss of the election.  Petulant man-baby failed to exact petty revenge on the TikTok kids that dunked on him at his rally.
    citylightsappleOferroundaboutnowviclauyycmuthuk_vanalingamchasm
  • Reply 6 of 7
    No American company was ever going to have to buy TikTok and the company was never in danger of being banned imo.  What we witnessed was an example of a toddler being told "in a minute" until they finally fell asleep, or in the case of Trump, the inevitable loss of the election.  Petulant man-baby failed to exact petty revenge on the TikTok kids that dunked on him at his rally.
    True -- except I think the possibility of Trump getting his way was far more likely than you think.   He had loyalists in the agencies that could have made it happen plus he came within 7 million votes (and few feet on January 6th) of being re-elected.    The man-baby's tantrum almost got him what he wanted.

    Democracy and its laws are easily toppled.   It requires continual vigilance -- which is likely what save TikTok.

    chasm
  • Reply 7 of 7
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,285member
    In today's news TikTok has agreed to pay $92 million to settle scores of lawsuits alleging that the video-sharing app harvested personal data from users, including information garnered from facial recognition technology and without user consent, and shared the data with third-parties, some of which were based in China.


    The proposed settlement, which lawyers in the case have called among the largest privacy-related payouts in history, applies to 89 million TikTok users in the U.S. whose personal data was allegedly tracked and sold to advertisers in violation of state and federal law ...

    ... the app “clandestinely vacuumed up” vast quantities of private and personally identifiable data that could be used to identify and surveil users without permission. Even information from draft videos that were never shared publicly on the app were mined by TikTok for data, the lawyers for the users alleged.

    ...TikTok was allegedly sending their information to servers in China, or in other countries where China-based employees could access the data.

    Tiktok also shared information about users, without their consent, with Facebook, Google and other companies, the suit claims.

    The proposed settlement, which still needs the court's approval, also calls for the company to change its data-collection practice.

    Under the proposed terms of the settlement, TikTok will no longer record a user’s biometric information, including facial characteristics, nor track a user’s location using GPS data. TikTok also committed to stop sending U.S. users data overseas and the app said it would no longer collect data on draft videos before the content is published.

    edited February 2021
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