Apple's Cook, Federighi, Schiller, other top execs to testify in trial with Epic

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 32
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,823moderator
    How many words will the Apple execs need to explain why YOU can't install any software YOU want on YOUR devices?
    You do know that, while you own the hardware, you only license the operating system.  So all of the code libraries an iOS app calls out to in order to accomplish everything from putting up a menu to complex drawing routines, are all the exclusive property of Apple.  You want to write software to directly access the hardware?  Go ahead.  When you’ve accomplished that, in, say, about six years with a large software development team of your own, we can talk about how expensive Apple’s fees are.  
    edited March 2021 n2itivguybestkeptsecretwatto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 32
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,823moderator
    Let’s say Epic achieves some level of victory in court. If I’m Apple, I might break out games into a separate App Store.  Apple may be preparing to do just that having already broken out games into a separate section of the existing App Store.  

    New App Store, new rules.  Apple could charge to be in that store, charge a service fee to the vendor per download, to cover the cost of serving up those gigabytes of data over its pipeline, etc, etc, etc until Epic begs to get back to the main App Store.  Sorry, you asked for it.   
    edited March 2021 watto_cobra
  • Reply 23 of 32
    What does the Free Fortnite logo represent? I'm sure I'll kick myself, but I just cannot figure it out!
    That is the profile of the Fortnite Lama (looking to the left).
    dangermouse2watto_cobra
  • Reply 24 of 32
    What does the Free Fortnite logo represent? I'm sure I'll kick myself, but I just cannot figure it out!
    It’s the Fortnite Llama mascot, plus llama piñatas are the main loot boxes in the game:

    https://fortnite.fandom.com/wiki/Llama_Pinatas

    So I guess the idea is that the Apple Llama is a loot box for Apple, or stealing Fortnite’s loot, or something. I’m sure they thought they were being super clever when they came up with it. But it does somehow encapsulate the stupidity of the whole campaign.
    Thanks. I don't think I need to kick myself at all as it was not obvious. I also think it's ugly, clumsy and conveys nothing, making it a poor logo.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 25 of 32
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,453member
    roake said:
    How many words will the Apple execs need to explain why YOU can't install any software YOU want on YOUR devices?
    You knew how iOS worked.  If you didn’t know, you didn’t read the agreements you signed.
    Along with everyone else.  No one reads those things, they aren't "signed" they're glossed over and dismissed.
  • Reply 26 of 32
    hexclockhexclock Posts: 1,232member
    What does the Free Fortnite logo represent? I'm sure I'll kick myself, but I just cannot figure it out!
    It means the trial is being moved to Apple Theater. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 27 of 32
    nealc5nealc5 Posts: 43member
    Once again, if one doesn’t like Apple’s App Store policies, one can decide to purchase an Android phone.  There are plenty to choose from. Android has an over 80% market share. Or a Windows phone. Oh wait, there are no more Windows phones, because developers didn’t want to develop for them and then people didn’t want to buy them.

    Nobody is forcing you to buy Apple and nobody is forcing Epic to make iOS games. Every purchase is a choice between features and limitations. Apple doesn’t make touchscreen Mac laptops. If that’s an important feature to you, then buy a Windows laptop. Want to crack the engine control computer of your Chevy and install software to get higher performance? GM doesn’t want you to do that. And if you do, your warranty will be void.

    Apple could and should review their App Store policies as the market demands change. 30% commission was considered very fair and cheap back in the day, compared to PC and even BlackBerry software. Maybe not so now. And Apple NEVER charged developers to put free apps on the App Store (except for the standard developer fees) for free downloads. 

    muthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 28 of 32
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 3,182member
    What does the Free Fortnite logo represent? I'm sure I'll kick myself, but I just cannot figure it out!
    The Easter Bunny
  • Reply 29 of 32
    How many words will the Apple execs need to explain why YOU can't install any software YOU want on YOUR devices?

    For someone with “appdeveloper” in their username, you don’t know fuck all about the software industry (licensing).
    radarthekatwatto_cobra
  • Reply 30 of 32
    How many words will the Apple execs need to explain why YOU can't install any software YOU want on YOUR devices?
    You do know that, while you own the hardware, you only license the operating system.  So all of the code libraries an iOS app calls out to in order to accomplish everything from putting up a menu to complex drawing routines, are all the exclusive property of Apple.  You want to write software to directly access the hardware?  Go ahead.  When you’ve accomplished that, in, say, about six years with a large software development team of your own, we can talk about how expensive Apple’s fees are.  
    I didn't mention anything about fees or developers or licensing an operating system. I spoke about ownership especially for those people that don't code. I am a developer. I can already write any software I want and run it on my iPhone. I am claiming that everyone else should be able to do the same whether or not they can code. I firmly believe that you should have the right to do anything you want with the devices you own and a company like Apple should not prevent you from doing it. Apple does not have to make this super easy or convenient but they also should not make it intentionally difficult to do either.
  • Reply 31 of 32
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,823moderator
    How many words will the Apple execs need to explain why YOU can't install any software YOU want on YOUR devices?
    You do know that, while you own the hardware, you only license the operating system.  So all of the code libraries an iOS app calls out to in order to accomplish everything from putting up a menu to complex drawing routines, are all the exclusive property of Apple.  You want to write software to directly access the hardware?  Go ahead.  When you’ve accomplished that, in, say, about six years with a large software development team of your own, we can talk about how expensive Apple’s fees are.  
    I didn't mention anything about fees or developers or licensing an operating system. I spoke about ownership especially for those people that don't code. I am a developer. I can already write any software I want and run it on my iPhone. I am claiming that everyone else should be able to do the same whether or not they can code. I firmly believe that you should have the right to do anything you want with the devices you own and a company like Apple should not prevent you from doing it. Apple does not have to make this super easy or convenient but they also should not make it intentionally difficult to do either.
    I got it the first time. What you want doesn’t exist for those who are not developers.  And as a developer you would not get too far installing other developers’ apps as they will be protective of their install limit.  Unless you know the developer well and maybe are a tester of their app.  But I strongly doubt Apple is going to grant your wish for all users.  They control what gets installed for a variety of reasons, not all having to do with generating income or profit.  I suspect they will fight hard to protect the status quo.   
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 32 of 32
    Thinking about OutdoorAppDev’s basic position here, I think maybe it boils down to the question of whether a mobile device is a personal computer. OAD wants to travel back in time 30 years and answer yes. But in our time, the answer is no, it’s not.

    The iPad ad in which the kid asks, at the end, “What’s a computer?” is telling — the answer to that question is, “Computers are what makes your device possible.” But they are not the same thing. Computers drive the Internet, they drive the development of iOS and Android, they drive the development of apps for those systems.

    Phones and tablets are not computers. They are, instead, dependent on computers. The same rules that apply to software development for computers do not, and should not, necessarily apply to mobile devices. They really are not the same thing.

    It’s about platforms. Mobile platforms like iOS and Android, or Facebook+, are increasingly subject to both government regulations and industry standards designed to shape those regulations. Dogmatically insisting that the same rules that apply to developer’s computers should apply to that kid’s iPad is a non-starter. Not even Epic is arguing for that.
    muthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
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