Adobe releases public beta of Premiere Pro for Apple Silicon

Posted:
in Mac Software
A native Apple Silicon edition of video editing software Adobe Premiere Pro is now available as a public beta.

Adobe Premiere Pro is now available for Apple Silicon M1 in public beta
Adobe Premiere Pro is now available for Apple Silicon M1 in public beta


Following its December 2020 limited beta release, an Apple Silicon M1 native edition of Adobe Premiere Pro has entered public beta.

"Since Premiere Pro is built on a large codebase with support for a wide range of media and workflows," announced the company in a blog post, "we will implement native support for Apple M1 in phases and some parts have not been ported yet."

"This phased approach allows us to validate performance and functionality for specific parts of the application before we add new components," it continues. "And it also allows you to start seeing the benefits now."

Adobe says that "the average editor is likely to see very little difference from the Intel version." The differences and current limitations, however, include how After Effects does not have an M1 version yet.

"The first public Beta includes all the core editing functions and workflows like color, graphics, and audio, as well as features like Productions, and multicam," says Adobe. "We prioritized support for the most widely used codecs, like H.264, HEVC, and ProRes."

Adobe is steadily updating its apps to Apple Silicon, and typically taking the same iterative approach. While Adobe Lightroom fully launched for M1 in December 2020, Photoshop for Apple Silicon only came out of beta in early March 2021, and then with caveats.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    bsbeamerbsbeamer Posts: 71member
    This is good news for macOS moving forward, even if it's going to take awhile to transition there.  Do not see abandoning Intel-based machines for production work anytime in the next 12-18 months, but 18-24 months should look fairly promising as additional AS machines are released.  Fingers crossed we are not losing chunks of functionality in the process/transition.  
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 11
    rob53rob53 Posts: 2,474member
    bsbeamer said:
    This is good news for macOS moving forward, even if it's going to take awhile to transition there.  Do not see abandoning Intel-based machines for production work anytime in the next 12-18 months, but 18-24 months should look fairly promising as additional AS machines are released.  Fingers crossed we are not losing chunks of functionality in the process/transition.  
    Not an Adobe user (anymore) but it does show how much influence Apple has on the market by forcing Adobe to hurry up and get their code ready for when the iMac and Mac Pro are released with Apple's M-series SoCs. Personally, I don't think you'll have to wait 18-24 months for Apple to release these Macs but you might have to wait for Adobe to complete their transition from their antique code base. It might take that long for plug-in vendors to complete the transition but if they were programming for macOS the correct way, the transition shouldn't be that bad.

    Isn't Apple having another announcement any time??? Like in late March. One of these rumors will actually come true. Can't wait to see benchmarks, including Premiere, blow away Intel-based Macs. It's been too long for a change and Apple's entry level M1 shows what a quantum leap ASi already makes. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 11
    Well done Adobe! Now Lightroom Classic pleeeeeaaaaaseeeee! :-)
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 11
    nicholfdnicholfd Posts: 416member
    rob53 said:
    bsbeamer said:
    This is good news for macOS moving forward, even if it's going to take awhile to transition there.  Do not see abandoning Intel-based machines for production work anytime in the next 12-18 months, but 18-24 months should look fairly promising as additional AS machines are released.  Fingers crossed we are not losing chunks of functionality in the process/transition.  
    Not an Adobe user (anymore) but it does show how much influence Apple has on the market by forcing Adobe to hurry up and get their code ready for when the iMac and Mac Pro are released with Apple's M-series SoCs. Personally, I don't think you'll have to wait 18-24 months for Apple to release these Macs but you might have to wait for Adobe to complete their transition from their antique code base. It might take that long for plug-in vendors to complete the transition but if they were programming for macOS the correct way, the transition shouldn't be that bad.

    Isn't Apple having another announcement any time??? Like in late March. One of these rumors will actually come true. Can't wait to see benchmarks, including Premiere, blow away Intel-based Macs. It's been too long for a change and Apple's entry level M1 shows what a quantum leap ASi already makes. 
    You might have missed it - your post is dated April 5th...  March has come & gone.
  • Reply 5 of 11
    sevenfeetsevenfeet Posts: 429member
    rob53 said:
    bsbeamer said:
    This is good news for macOS moving forward, even if it's going to take awhile to transition there.  Do not see abandoning Intel-based machines for production work anytime in the next 12-18 months, but 18-24 months should look fairly promising as additional AS machines are released.  Fingers crossed we are not losing chunks of functionality in the process/transition.  
    Not an Adobe user (anymore) but it does show how much influence Apple has on the market by forcing Adobe to hurry up and get their code ready for when the iMac and Mac Pro are released with Apple's M-series SoCs. Personally, I don't think you'll have to wait 18-24 months for Apple to release these Macs but you might have to wait for Adobe to complete their transition from their antique code base. It might take that long for plug-in vendors to complete the transition but if they were programming for macOS the correct way, the transition shouldn't be that bad.

    Isn't Apple having another announcement any time??? Like in late March. One of these rumors will actually come true. Can't wait to see benchmarks, including Premiere, blow away Intel-based Macs. It's been too long for a change and Apple's entry level M1 shows what a quantum leap ASi already makes. 
    Premiere Pro dates back nearly 20 years having launched in 2003 and its predecessor Adobe Premiere was released 30 years ago. Which means that it's one of those apps that has survived the transition from 68K -> PowerPC and PowerPC -> Intel before now. While I wouldn't expect 30 year old code to still be lurking in there, I'm sure there is lots of older Objective-C code that will need to be examined. And for problematic stuff, there's always the opportunity for a Swift migration, which takes time.
    fastasleepwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 11
    bsbeamerbsbeamer Posts: 71member
    ^^^
    While it did survive, Adobe abandoned Premiere 7.0 / Premiere Pro CS / 1.0 for Mac in 2003/2004 while they re-wrote the entire program for Intel CPUs.  Was not available on Mac again until CS3 in 2007.  Some would argue it was not really "useable" in a professional capacity until CS5.5 or CS6 which happened to be around the same time Apple abandoned FCP7 in favor of FCP-X.  
    fastasleepwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 11
    looplessloopless Posts: 192member
    The problems Adobe has in porting are going to be because of code for their image processing operations that were developed over many years  and highly optimized for Intel CPUs.

    Some examples might be  taking advantage of AVX instructions ( not supported by Rosetta)  perhaps even some assembly code and the use of highly optimized libraries from Intel , such as Intel IPP or MKL - which will never be on M1. Some parts of those Intel libraries have no open source or exact equivalent on MacOS M1 - and Intel has bluntly stated they will never be "ported" as they are designed to show off Intel CPUs.  Intel also has of course abandoned their compiler suite for OS X.

    Apple has screwed many developers by jumping from technology to technology for high performance computing - many developers are probably feeling burnt.
    fastasleep
  • Reply 8 of 11
    Do people still use Premiere?

    I wonder if this wasn't more motivated by the fact that DaVinci Resolve and Final Cut Pro are already native and have been from launch. Final Cut has always done well in it's lane and DaVinci Resolve has really taken a lot of market share from Premiere. It's free, includes a after affects competitor and an audio editor. Or if you buy the full version you get a lifetime license, so it includes future versions.

    I wonder if this is less about Apple pressuring them and more that people are switching to other compitition fast. Having an M1 mac has made me change programs I use on a regular basis to do whichever is native to the silicon. And I'll probably keep those changes even when my privous software becomes native. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 11
    bsbeamerbsbeamer Posts: 71member
    loopless said:
    Apple has screwed many developers by jumping from technology to technology for high performance computing - many developers are probably feeling burnt.
    Which is why Adobe getting onboard with M1/Mx development for their video tools is a good sign.  Will likely trigger others that have not yet embraced to at least explore the possibilities.  Not convinced the transition period will be seamless or as smooth as Apple advertises, but in 2-3 years it will be a much different place.

    Do people still use Premiere?
    Yes.  You won't see popularity with YouTuber's and that segment of the market, but Adobe Premiere Pro is still being used pretty widely.  It is even popular in some news environments that realized the Avid business model was not flexible enough for their bottom line or needs with remote/mobile field production.  Restrictions on Avid certified systems for Media Composer and NewsCutter did not help with this.  Add in their dongles and you're left with mobile trucks and more staff vs. solo or pair using cars/SUVs/microvans.  Talk to anyone managing a budget and the impact is nearly immediate.  

    Resolve has their place, but more and more is with the indie film style market and those who want to shoot in RAW with LUTs and pixel peepers who can spend 20 minutes evaluating a single cut.  Blackmagic is trying to change that image, but until it sees more ENG usage it will be an uphill battle.
  • Reply 10 of 11
    rob53rob53 Posts: 2,474member
    nicholfd said:
    rob53 said:
    bsbeamer said:
    This is good news for macOS moving forward, even if it's going to take awhile to transition there.  Do not see abandoning Intel-based machines for production work anytime in the next 12-18 months, but 18-24 months should look fairly promising as additional AS machines are released.  Fingers crossed we are not losing chunks of functionality in the process/transition.  
    Not an Adobe user (anymore) but it does show how much influence Apple has on the market by forcing Adobe to hurry up and get their code ready for when the iMac and Mac Pro are released with Apple's M-series SoCs. Personally, I don't think you'll have to wait 18-24 months for Apple to release these Macs but you might have to wait for Adobe to complete their transition from their antique code base. It might take that long for plug-in vendors to complete the transition but if they were programming for macOS the correct way, the transition shouldn't be that bad.

    Isn't Apple having another announcement any time??? Like in late March. One of these rumors will actually come true. Can't wait to see benchmarks, including Premiere, blow away Intel-based Macs. It's been too long for a change and Apple's entry level M1 shows what a quantum leap ASi already makes. 
    You might have missed it - your post is dated April 5th...  March has come & gone.
    You need to re-read my comment. I was talking about the Apple announcement that didn’t happen March 23 but MIGHT happen in early April. We’re still in early April. 
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 11 of 11
    frantisekfrantisek Posts: 724member
    Well done Adobe! Now Lightroom Classic pleeeeeaaaaaseeeee! :-)
    It will be probably the last one.....

    But it shows that iMacs are probably imminent as Adobe do not wanna give competitors any bigger advantage.
    watto_cobra
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