Apple Mac shipments grew more than 110% year-over-year in Q1 2021

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in General Discussion
Apple's Mac is continuing to see a surge in growth, with the company shipping more than double the number of units in the first quarter of 2021 than the year-ago quarter.

Credit: Andrew O'Hara, AppleInsider
Credit: Andrew O'Hara, AppleInsider


The Cupertino tech giant shipped an estimated 6.7 million Mac models in Q1 2021, up from an estimated 3.1 million shipments in Q1 2020, according to new data from analysis firm IDC. The surge represents growth of 111.5% year-over-year.

Apple's share of the market also grew during that period, from 5.8% in the first quarter of 2020 to 8% in the first quarter of 2021. Apple clocked in fourth among the top PC vendors, behind Lenovo, HP, and Dell. None of those companies saw the same type of growth, however.

The entire PC market also saw a continued surge in growth in the first quarter. Global shipments of desktops, notebooks, and workstations grew 55.2% year-over-year.

According to IDC, the growth rate benefitted from the shortages faced in the first quarter of 2020 in the early days of the coronavirus pandemic. While PC demand remains extremely high, the lack of shortages resulted in "unusually high" first quarter growth in 2021.

"Unfulfilled demand from the past year has carried forward into the first quarter and additional demand brought on by the pandemic has also continued to drive volume. However, the market continues to struggle with setbacks including component shortages and logistics issues, each of which has contributed to an increase in average selling prices," said Jitesh Ubrani, an IDC research manager.

The continued surge in the PC Market, as well as an increase in PC average selling prices (ASP), have been driven by growth in gaming, the need for higher performance notebooks for enterprise, and an increase in touchscreen device demand for the education market, IDC says.

Although ongoing component shortage issues is continuing to plague the industry, IDC Worldwide Mobile Device Tracker Vice President Ryan Reith says the outlook will remain upbeat for years to come.

"The ongoing shortages in the semiconductor space only further prolong the ability for vendors to refill inventory and fulfill orders to customers. We believe a fundamental shift has occurred around the PC, which will result in a more positive outlook for years to follow," Reith said.

Apple also saw strong growth in the fourth quarter of 2020, IDC data indicated at the time. The company shipped 7.3 million units, a 49.2% increase from 4.9 million units year-over-year.

The company also reported at its last earnings call that Mac shipment revenue had reached $8.67 billion in the fourth quarter of 2020, representing growth of 21%.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 22
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,254member
    And we ain't seen nothin' yet!  M2 and MX Macs yet to come, I have my Card ready.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 22
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,012member
    MacPro said:
    And we ain't seen nothin' yet!  M2 and MX Macs yet to come, I have my Card ready.
    Moi aussi.
    Beatswatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 3 of 22
    blastdoorblastdoor Posts: 2,362member
    No wonder intel is running anti-Mac ads!
    baconstangwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 22
    blastdoorblastdoor Posts: 2,362member
    MacPro said:
    And we ain't seen nothin' yet!  M2 and MX Macs yet to come, I have my Card ready.
    In terms of performance, Yes.

    in terms of sales, I doubt this crazy high growth rate can be maintained. Two main reasons:

    1. When everyone is vaccinated I bet we see much less growth in tech spending 

    2. Apple has already upgraded about 90% of Mac unit volume to M1. While I personally am more interested in the iMac and Mac Pro, most folks buy the MBA, MBP13, or mini 
    entropyswatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 22
    qwerty52qwerty52 Posts: 284member
    Bad news for Surface Pro. Sorry Microsoft, it is a pity for your stupid compare-ads. Never compare with Apple
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 22
    thttht Posts: 3,931member
    Too bad Apple doesn't sell a branded monitor. 21.5" 4K and 27" 5K monitors with webcam, mic, speakers and an assortment of ports would have sold a lot of units to accompany all those Mac sales. I can understand stopping the WiFi routers, but not having a monitor is craziness. It's billions of dollars not taken, and it probably nicks at Apple's brand image with not-Apple monitors attached to their hardware to boot.

    The sales estimate is indeed not as good as the headlines make it appear. Q1/Q2 2020 was depressed by supply chain issues at the start of the pandemic. For Q1 2021, the supply chain issues seemed to be mostly re-ramped out, with the current supply issues noted, increased demand for at-home work and at-home play, and the best low end Macs in the lineup in forever. These peaks and valleys would have been smoothed over in an alternate reality without a pandemic.

    Apple has a bit freedom to go for marketshare with Apple Silicon. An A14 based SKU: an M1 divided by 2 with 2 p-cores, 4 GPU cores, 8 GB RAM, and 1 TB controller could make for fanless $500 Mac mini and an $800 MBA. That's getting pretty close to "impulse" buy levels for a lot of folks. Really wonder what revenue-profit criteria they to make this decision.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 22
    danvmdanvm Posts: 1,126member
    qwerty52 said:
    Bad news for Surface Pro. Sorry Microsoft, it is a pity for your stupid compare-ads. Never compare with Apple
    I don't think it's all bad news for MS, considering most PC's / laptops sell with Windows pre-installed.  
    revenant
  • Reply 8 of 22
    Apple silicon slides nicely into the market. Vastly improved performance - particularly the (former) graphics showstopper - at current price points triggers plenty of shopping genes. I certainly reconsidered both Air og Mini - both are suddenly relevant. 

    No worries for Apple - the Macs will do brilliantly.

    With Intel out of the way they are in much much better control of the release strategy and are able to slip new hardware into the market when it suits Apple, be it sales that slips up or putting straight future iron clads with 0s and 1s from Squaretown.
  • Reply 9 of 22
    blastdoor said:
    MacPro said:
    And we ain't seen nothin' yet!  M2 and MX Macs yet to come, I have my Card ready.
    In terms of performance, Yes.

    in terms of sales, I doubt this crazy high growth rate can be maintained. Two main reasons:

    1. When everyone is vaccinated I bet we see much less growth in tech spending 

    2. Apple has already upgraded about 90% of Mac unit volume to M1. While I personally am more interested in the iMac and Mac Pro, most folks buy the MBA, MBP13, or mini 
    It won't be 100% but still strong, especially when they introduce M2 and discount M1.

    Ad 1. 😂 not gonna happen.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 22
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 9,269member
    danvm said:
    qwerty52 said:
    Bad news for Surface Pro. Sorry Microsoft, it is a pity for your stupid compare-ads. Never compare with Apple
    I don't think it's all bad news for MS, considering most PC's / laptops sell with Windows pre-installed.  
    At 8% market share, Macs are an also ran.  A yawn....
     
    Lenovo   17M, 25.1%
    HP   21.4M,  21.4%
    Dell  11.5M, 16.5%
    Apple  5.6M  8.0%

    Source:  Gartner Group

    *  But Apple could change that equation by enabling the iPad to function as a true 2-in-1 machine.  That would be a game changer.  So far though, they have only pussy-footed around the edges, dipping their toes into the water.   Timid doesn't get you anywhere.



    edited April 13
  • Reply 11 of 22
    At 8% market share, Macs are an also ran.  A yawn....
    Lenovo   17M, 25.1%
    HP   21.4M,  21.4%
    Dell  11.5M, 16.5%
    Apple  5.6M  8.0%

    Source:  Gartner Group

    *  But Apple could change that equation by enabling the iPad to function as a true 2-in-1 machine.  That would be a game changer.  So far though, they have only pussy-footed around the edges, dipping their toes into the water.   Timid doesn't get you anywhere.
    ----
    Well....

    With the exemption of Thinkpads, the industry basically takes their design cues from Apple. On laptops they have done so since unibody arrived, Apple still owns the pad market and are comfy with iPhone. Wrt pads, Microsoft still has plenty of cleaning up to do in the structure of Windows (they spent years to get rid of Explorer), and they will not be able to compete (wrt technical efficiency on Arm) with *nixbased systems until they  swap to Linux. Which they will do  sooner or later.  They got 4 legs and are dragging 2 of them. 

    I hardly believe Apple will outsell the Microsoft sphere on desktop/laptop, but Apple is happy with that.


  • Reply 12 of 22
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 9,269member
    Hubro said:
    At 8% market share, Macs are an also ran.  A yawn....
    Lenovo   17M, 25.1%
    HP   21.4M,  21.4%
    Dell  11.5M, 16.5%
    Apple  5.6M  8.0%

    Source:  Gartner Group

    *  But Apple could change that equation by enabling the iPad to function as a true 2-in-1 machine.  That would be a game changer.  So far though, they have only pussy-footed around the edges, dipping their toes into the water.   Timid doesn't get you anywhere.
    ----
    Well....

    With the exemption of Thinkpads, the industry basically takes their design cues from Apple. On laptops they have done so since unibody arrived, Apple still owns the pad market and are comfy with iPhone. Wrt pads, Microsoft still has plenty of cleaning up to do in the structure of Windows (they spent years to get rid of Explorer), and they will not be able to compete (wrt technical efficiency on Arm) with *nixbased systems until they  swap to Linux. Which they will do  sooner or later.  They got 4 legs and are dragging 2 of them. 

    I hardly believe Apple will outsell the Microsoft sphere on desktop/laptop, but Apple is happy with that.


    The last time Apple led the way forward in laptops was January 2008 when Steve pulled the MacBook Air out of an envelope.

    Since then buying a laptop is a bit like buying a washing machine:  Any color you want as long as it's white.

    edited April 13
  • Reply 13 of 22
    The last time Apple led the way forward in laptops was January 2008 when Steve pulled the MacBook Air out of an envelope.

    Since then buying a laptop is a bit like buying a washing machine:  Any color you want as long as it's white.
    Unibody. 

    There's been significant improvements since then and Apple have been the driving force behind e.g screen quality, but the new shift of paradigm happened with the M1.
  • Reply 14 of 22
    thttht Posts: 3,931member
    Hubro said:
    The last time Apple led the way forward in laptops was January 2008 when Steve pulled the MacBook Air out of an envelope.

    Since then buying a laptop is a bit like buying a washing machine:  Any color you want as long as it's white.
    Unibody. 

    There's been significant improvements since then and Apple have been the driving force behind e.g screen quality, but the new shift of paradigm happened with the M1.
    GeorgeBMac is thinking in different terms then you are. ;)

    It should be noted that the 2008 MBA was a failure, while the 2010 MBA models finally arrived at the right features and price points to really become successful. It became so successful that the MBA form factor can been seen in a lot of laptop models now, making the laptop market a bit homogeneous. 

    That’s not Apple’s fault though. The market has reached maturity though. 

    There is a push to 2 lb 13” laptops.  Apple tried with the rMB. PC OEMs are trying. Still a question to me whether it will be a material benefit to the vast majority of the market. 4 to 3 lb, combined with 1” to 0.75” thickness, was big win. 3 to 2 lb and 0.75” to 0.5”? Not so sure. Perhaps our human hands can’t really appreciate it. 

    Waiting on those folding displays to see how it goes. 
  • Reply 15 of 22
    tht said:
    GeorgeBMac is thinking in different terms then you are. ;)

    It should be noted that the 2008 MBA was a failure, while the 2010 MBA models finally arrived at the right features and price points to really become successful. It became so successful that the MBA form factor can been seen in a lot of laptop models now, making the laptop market a bit homogeneous. 

    That’s not Apple’s fault though. The market has reached maturity though. 

    There is a push to 2 lb 13” laptops.  Apple tried with the rMB. PC OEMs are trying. Still a question to me whether it will be a material benefit to the vast majority of the market. 4 to 3 lb, combined with 1” to 0.75” thickness, was big win. 3 to 2 lb and 0.75” to 0.5”? Not so sure. Perhaps our human hands can’t really appreciate it. 

    Waiting on those folding displays to see how it goes. 
    Thinkpads were always the pro reference, MacBook unibody was the first to reach that level and beyond (TP keyboard is still better than MacBooks though), and therefore it was a big turning point. Agree that Air was a game changer wrt portability, but they always came up quite a bit short on the graphics side, and dual core cpu retirement was long overdue. Prior to Air virtually all light and small laptops were flimsy and weak in structure and specs. We got abt 60 lightweights, and I believe 58 of them failed. I traded mine asap for a TP that I could trust before the rest realised that they were carrying cr#p. 

    To me, 3-4 lbs is a sensible limit. Whatever they can shave off below that I want filled with more Wh. Pretty sure there will be new MacBook designs soon, it made sense to run the first M1 series in old chassises. 

    Apple Silicon is a revolution in terms of the combo performance/graphics/battery, and they will probably be able to cut further down on power consumption by both sw/hw optimisation and more efficient screens. 2 thunderbolt ports needs to become 4 though. 
  • Reply 16 of 22
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 9,269member
    tht said:
    Hubro said:
    The last time Apple led the way forward in laptops was January 2008 when Steve pulled the MacBook Air out of an envelope.

    Since then buying a laptop is a bit like buying a washing machine:  Any color you want as long as it's white.
    Unibody. 

    There's been significant improvements since then and Apple have been the driving force behind e.g screen quality, but the new shift of paradigm happened with the M1.
    GeorgeBMac is thinking in different terms then you are. ;)

    It should be noted that the 2008 MBA was a failure, while the 2010 MBA models finally arrived at the right features and price points to really become successful. It became so successful that the MBA form factor can been seen in a lot of laptop models now, making the laptop market a bit homogeneous. 

    That’s not Apple’s fault though. The market has reached maturity though. 

    There is a push to 2 lb 13” laptops.  Apple tried with the rMB. PC OEMs are trying. Still a question to me whether it will be a material benefit to the vast majority of the market. 4 to 3 lb, combined with 1” to 0.75” thickness, was big win. 3 to 2 lb and 0.75” to 0.5”? Not so sure. Perhaps our human hands can’t really appreciate it. 

    Waiting on those folding displays to see how it goes. 
    Yeh, so Apple (and lots of the rest of the laptop market) simply coalesced around Steve's 2008 MBA (yeh, its been refined since then).

    Apple has the potential to shake things up again with the M1 processor by blending the iOS infrastructure in with the laptop paradigm.  But so far it's merely been a processor swap giving it a bit more power with less energy wasted - an incremental improvement.

    Hopefully Apple will take advantage of the M1 and use it to produce a new standard in the computing market -- most likely where the separate world's of laptop and tablet computing merge and, instead of fighting against each other, competing with each other, they converge to offer the best of both to the world.  And, as you point out, folding displays bay be part of that too.

  • Reply 17 of 22
    Not overly enthusiastic abt pad/laptop combo, but if anyone, Apple could do it. Microsofts attempt with tiles failed miserably because they tried to combine form factors that don't really blend with one ux. Imho they failed first on the platforms the ux was best suited (mobile/pads) because it got such a miserable reputation on the platforms it didn't work (desktop/laptop). Thinkpads have a long history of Laptop/Pad combos that failed, and that got quite a bit to do with the ux.

    Apple kept each ux where it was best suited, which is one of the reasons that the pads dominates now. The split between iPhone and iPad OS was a good idea. Make the best possible ux for the intended usage of the device.

    Now, the Apple OS family is in far better shape and way better suited for combos than Windows thanks to the *nix concept and the work Apple has done. But one still will need differences to the ux of different form factors. If there's a merge between formfactors within the Apple sphere it's more likely that the continue that work with the pads as the basis, than morphing the MacBooks.

    Shure, pads are preferable while commuting and laptops for portability, but for most heavy production work it will still be more productive thus preferable with a suitable big monitor and a proper keyboard for quite some time. I would surely like to get down from 4 to 3 devices, and the one I want to get rid of is the MacBook Pro. I would like to keep iPhone (mini), iPad (with keyboard) and Mac/Mac Mini/(iMac if they arrive with a 32+ screen). But the iPad ux and apps are not quite ready for that. Yet. It will.
  • Reply 18 of 22
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 9,269member
    Hubro said:
    Not overly enthusiastic abt pad/laptop combo, but if anyone, Apple could do it. Microsofts attempt with tiles failed miserably because they tried to combine form factors that don't really blend with one ux. Imho they failed first on the platforms the ux was best suited (mobile/pads) because it got such a miserable reputation on the platforms it didn't work (desktop/laptop). Thinkpads have a long history of Laptop/Pad combos that failed, and that got quite a bit to do with the ux.

    Apple kept each ux where it was best suited, which is one of the reasons that the pads dominates now. The split between iPhone and iPad OS was a good idea. Make the best possible ux for the intended usage of the device.

    Now, the Apple OS family is in far better shape and way better suited for combos than Windows thanks to the *nix concept and the work Apple has done. But one still will need differences to the ux of different form factors. If there's a merge between formfactors within the Apple sphere it's more likely that the continue that work with the pads as the basis, than morphing the MacBooks.

    Shure, pads are preferable while commuting and laptops for portability, but for most heavy production work it will still be more productive thus preferable with a suitable big monitor and a proper keyboard for quite some time. I would surely like to get down from 4 to 3 devices, and the one I want to get rid of is the MacBook Pro. I would like to keep iPhone (mini), iPad (with keyboard) and Mac/Mac Mini/(iMac if they arrive with a 32+ screen). But the iPad ux and apps are not quite ready for that. Yet. It will.
    Are you assuming that creating a 2 in 1 device means that both OS's will suffer?
    Not necessarily.   MS and others seamlessly switch between full laptop mode and tablet mode without compromising either.  Apple could do the same.  And, now that they are driving both with essentially the same processor, that becomes much more doable.

  • Reply 19 of 22
    I'm sure Apple have been playing with 2-1´s for years already, and the changes in Big Sur should be construed evidence of that. It does already prove Apple silicon/feasability. A.o. the adaptation of apps. 

    They will bake in functionality from one to the other, but my point is that you will not use the same ux. You may use "the same" os, but a different ux. Basically what Apple does now - with some major adjustments.

    Everybody saw how it went when MS tried to use the same ux on all formfactors. I believe they would still have been In the business of selling MS mobiles (and pads) and doing well with them if they had left out laptops and desktops when tiling up.

    Still some miles to go B4 Microsoft nails it.
    edited April 14
  • Reply 20 of 22
    thttht Posts: 3,931member
    Yes, different input methods or the primary method for input being different necessarily means different UI to get it right. For the foldables, I think the best path is probably adding necessary features to iPadOS to really make computing easier. Apple will have to put in the work to make the UI of their Pro apps for multi-touch, and other complex app makes will have to do the same. This transition is going to be a lot harder than a chip ISA switch though. It would probably work if they used macOS as an OS for a foldable, but for a lot or most situations, people would have to use a mouse or trackpad for those complex apps. If so, is it materially better or different?

    The foldable concept is to use it like a laptop with the bottom half displaying virtual keyboards, trackpads and stylus; fold it open or flat, put it on a dock/stand vertically and use it like a desktop with external displays, keyboards and pointing devices; have it lay flat on table and use it like a large tablet with stylus, virtual keyboards and trackpads; connect it to an external display and use it as an input device; and, fold it 360° and use it in on a couch or bed like smaller tablet.

    A model that is folded in half to a 13" 4:3 sized display will unfold along the long edge to a 18.5" 3:2 sized display. About 3 lb. Interesting to think about. It will need to have coating to make wiping fingerprints off super easy.

    Anyways, not sure robust and durable display covers for foldables will beat AR glasses to the market. AR glasses that can display a virtual display with legible small font text? Game changer.
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