iPhone 11, iPhone 12 dominate Apple's US sales, cheaper models struggle

Posted:
in iPhone edited April 22
The iPhone 11 was the top-selling individual model in the U.S. during Apple's second quarter, while the four iPhone 12 models comprised 61% of sales.

The 19-month-old iPhone 11 gained the US sales crown in the March 2021 quarter
The 19-month-old iPhone 11 gained the US sales crown in the March 2021 quarter


The lower-cost iPhone 11 captured a 24% share of Apple's U.S. sales during the March 2021 fiscal quarter, according to data analysis group Consumer Intelligence Research Partners (CIRP). The handset's combination of large screen and $599 starting price appear to make it a hot seller more than 19 months after the phone launched.

The iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro Max were the next top sellers. The latter, the largest and most expensive model in Apple's lineup, made up 20% of quarterly sales.

"In the first full quarter of availability, we now see how consumers prefer the full-size iPhone 12 and 12 Pro models, and legacy iPhone 11, avoiding iPhone mini and SE," said Josh Lowitz, CIRP partner and co-founder.

"The iPhone 12 models, including the base, Pro, and Pro Max, all garnered decent share, divided relatively equally among them, including the highest-priced iPhone 12 Pro Max with 20% of sales. This improved on how the iPhone 11 Pro Max models performed a year ago, when it accounted for 13% of sales."

The iPhone 12 mini continues to show signs of disappointment, coming in last among the iPhone 12 series. The iPhone SE also lagged behind larger models, with only a slightly higher share than the iPhone 12 mini. CIRP's January report also indicated slow sales for the miniature 5G-capable variant.

The iPhone 12 mini continues to show signs of disappointing sales, lagging behind the iPhone SE
The iPhone 12 mini continues to show signs of disappointing sales, lagging behind the iPhone SE


The sales breakdown led to a slight decrease in U.S. Weighted Average Retail Price (US-WARP) from the holiday quarter. During the second quarter, Apple averaged $847 per iPhone sold in the U.S., compared to $873 for the bustling December 2020 holiday quarter. However, Q2 marked a significant rise over the $795 average sale price from the same quarter in 2020.

"Comparisons to the December 2020 quarter are difficult, with COVID-19, holiday sales, and the mix of old and new models introduced in that quarter," said Mike Levin, CIRP Partner and Co-Founder. "The decrease reflects the shift back to the year-old iPhone 11, and residual popularity of the older iPhone XR. That decrease was mitigated by continuing strength in the higher priced iPhone 12 models, and the $100 price increase for the core iPhone 12, contributing to the increase in US-WARP relative to the year-ago quarter."

The iPhone 12 series released in October and November of 2020. The handsets are the first 5G models in Apple's stable, offering consumers theoretically higher wireless data speeds.

In January, analysts were upbeat about Apple's fortunes in 2021, predicting the iPhone lineup will outpace smartphone industry growth.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 17
    iOS_Guy80iOS_Guy80 Posts: 458member
    I so dislike the term cheaper when referring to products. Apple does not make cheap products they make lesser expensive models than others.

    Cheap denotes inferior quality, not worth buying and not worth owning. I do not think Apple products fit into that category.
    Beatswatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 17
    iOS_Guy80iOS_Guy80 Posts: 458member
    I realize the author was not referring to Apple as being a cheap product. Although I have seen the word cheap used in describing Apple products in other articles by other authors. The word she just has a bad connotation to me.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 17
    BeatsBeats Posts: 2,097member
    If these figures are close to real it’s obvious why the Mini isn’t selling as well. It’s freaking GIGANTIC!!!

    What a stupid name for an iPhone.




    Which ones Mini??
    edited April 22
  • Reply 4 of 17
    The iPhone 12 mini is slightly lighter and smaller than iPhone 7, with slightly smaller screen than iPhone 7 Plus. 

    As the iPhone 7 Plus approaches end of life in the hands of their last owners, these owners will (with 12 mini) be able to replace the iPhone 7 Plus with 12 Mini and get more screen estate and higher dpi (from 5,5" 401 dpi to 5,42" 476 dpi). 

    ...basically you get a iPhone 7 Plus with longer screen in the same physical frame.  And it will never be mini  B)






  • Reply 5 of 17
    Hank2.0Hank2.0 Posts: 106member
    I loved my original iPhone SE because of its near full capabilities in a compact size. Then Apple made the bigger, cheaper, less capable SE and a smaller but pricy iPhone 12 called "mini" (with all lowercase for emphasis). Is it any wonder people aren't buying a Special Edition that isn't special? is it any wonder people aren't buying an iPhone with a name that, for many people, means not just small size but less capability, in spite of impressive specs? Dumb move, Apple, dumb.
    My post Sep 21, 2020:
    iPhone 12 SE? OK.  iPhone 12 Mini? No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No,
    My post Jan 6, 2021:
    The only thing I don't like is the "mini" tag. It cheapens and understates the iPhone's value and capability. The original SE wasn't a technically warmed over 5; it was better than the 6 and almost as good as the 7 (and in some ways better). IMO Apple screwed up making the "SE" tag to mean "cheap with older tech". If any iPhone deserves to be called "Special", it's the 12 mini.


    Beats
  • Reply 6 of 17
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,076member
    iOS_Guy80 said:
    I so dislike the term cheaper when referring to products. Apple does not make cheap products they make lesser expensive models than others.

    Cheap denotes inferior quality, not worth buying and not worth owning. I do not think Apple products fit into that category.
    "Cheaper" is quite valid without connotations of low quality, "cheap" on the other hand does imply low quality (though not necessarily in all cases, and AI never used "cheap" anyway). You could say "less expensive than" which could imply the other thing in the comparison is expensive, doesn't mean it is though. Marketing has had an effect on the word "cheap," making cheap things seem less desirable, even if they are good value (a la iPhone SE).
  • Reply 7 of 17
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 17,421member
    My issue with this take isn't the word "cheap" as much as it misses some key considerations.  When we see words like "disappointing" or "stumbles" it's important to ask: Disappointing to whom?  Stumbled compared to what?  If we're talking about analysts or the media, have we considered that their expectations might not be consistent with Apple's own expectations?  Apple may have anticipated exactly these results (or they may not have).  

    Secondly, the bulk of sales are the more expensive models, just as the article states.  But isn't that a good thing? That means more of Apple's sales are higher priced, often higher-margin products.  True, it's estimated that the Mini only accounts for 6% of US iPhone sales.  But the question is, where would those hypothetical additional sales come from?  If the share was 20% instead of 6%, that might not be a good thing.  What if it came from more expensive models?  
    bageljoeywatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 17
    bageljoeybageljoey Posts: 1,917member
    sdw2001 said:
    ...  But the question is, where would those hypothetical additional sales come from?  If the share was 20% instead of 6%, that might not be a good thing.  What if it came from more expensive models?  
    EXACTLY!  I have no idea what Apple expected from the mini, and I have no interest in that phone myself. 
    However, 6% of iPhone sales in nothing to sneeze at!! How many companies would die to have revenues equal to that?  If the people buying the Mini would have bought from another brand, then I imagine it is bringing value to Apple. If they would have bought a 12 or an SE in the absence of a Mini offering, then it is not bringing much value. 
    Just looking at one number does not tell you enough to make a judgement...
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 17
    sanssans Posts: 53member
    "Cheaper models struggle" compared to what? Other Apple phones? Smartphones in general? I'm sure LG would have loved to have the "cheaper models" sales numbers.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 17
    sans said:
    "Cheaper models struggle" compared to what? Other Apple phones? Smartphones in general? I'm sure LG would have loved to have the "cheaper models" sales numbers.
    Struggles compared to the sales of the other phones mentioned in the article.  iPhones sold in the US.  This isn't an article about smartphones in general. It's an article specifically about Apple's US smartphone sales only.  It's entirely possible the market share for each model is completely different in other regions.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 11 of 17
    entropysentropys Posts: 2,884member
    Look, iPhone 12 mini sales are less than other models, because those that want a smaller phone are a smaller group. That group though, is probably larger than the sales of any other non Apple model of phone except a couple of Samsung phones.

    And of those that have bought a mini, do they love it, or have buyer’s regret? I suspect they love it.

    I do.

    I would also expect that those that buy a mini know what they want, and be quite vocal about it.  Those on the fence would probably go for more screen real estate. But stepping up from a 6S, 7 or 8 the mini screen is actually bigger in a smaller phone.

    In the words of Farmer Hoggett,  “that’ll do, Pig, that’ll do”.

    edited April 22 watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 17
    Hank2.0 said:
    I loved my original iPhone SE because of its near full capabilities in a compact size. Then Apple made the bigger, cheaper, less capable SE and a smaller but pricy iPhone 12 called "mini" (with all lowercase for emphasis). Is it any wonder people aren't buying a Special Edition that isn't special? is it any wonder people aren't buying an iPhone with a name that, for many people, means not just small size but less capability, in spite of impressive specs? Dumb move, Apple, dumb.
    My post Sep 21, 2020:
    iPhone 12 SE? OK.  iPhone 12 Mini? No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No,
    My post Jan 6, 2021:
    The only thing I don't like is the "mini" tag. It cheapens and understates the iPhone's value and capability. The original SE wasn't a technically warmed over 5; it was better than the 6 and almost as good as the 7 (and in some ways better). IMO Apple screwed up making the "SE" tag to mean "cheap with older tech". If any iPhone deserves to be called "Special", it's the 12 mini.
    I still use my original iPhone SE. I'm in the market this year for a new iPhone, but I really don't like the big ones. My wife bought an 8 plus a couple of years back, because she likes to have the better camera. The thing is huge. It won't fit in any pants pockets, especially hers. My iPhone SE was the perfect replacement for my iPhone 4S. Both models were great in the pocket and in the hand. Both lasted about 4–5 years before their batteries gave out.

    Alas Apple is firmly set now on bigger SKUs, which is a shame. I have an iPad when I'm on the go and need a bigger screen. Bigger iPhones solve no problems for me. The "best" option now for my use case is the 12 mini, but I agree that the branding cheapens the device. It's like getting a hand-down form my little kids.
    Beatswatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 17
    entropysentropys Posts: 2,884member
    Hank2.0 said:
    I loved my original iPhone SE because of its near full capabilities in a compact size. Then Apple made the bigger, cheaper, less capable SE and a smaller but pricy iPhone 12 called "mini" (with all lowercase for emphasis). Is it any wonder people aren't buying a Special Edition that isn't special? is it any wonder people aren't buying an iPhone with a name that, for many people, means not just small size but less capability, in spite of impressive specs? Dumb move, Apple, dumb.
    My post Sep 21, 2020:
    iPhone 12 SE? OK.  iPhone 12 Mini? No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No,
    My post Jan 6, 2021:
    The only thing I don't like is the "mini" tag. It cheapens and understates the iPhone's value and capability. The original SE wasn't a technically warmed over 5; it was better than the 6 and almost as good as the 7 (and in some ways better). IMO Apple screwed up making the "SE" tag to mean "cheap with older tech". If any iPhone deserves to be called "Special", it's the 12 mini.
    I still use my original iPhone SE. I'm in the market this year for a new iPhone, but I really don't like the big ones. My wife bought an 8 plus a couple of years back, because she likes to have the better camera. The thing is huge. It won't fit in any pants pockets, especially hers. My iPhone SE was the perfect replacement for my iPhone 4S. Both models were great in the pocket and in the hand. Both lasted about 4–5 years before their batteries gave out.

    Alas Apple is firmly set now on bigger SKUs, which is a shame. I have an iPad when I'm on the go and need a bigger screen. Bigger iPhones solve no problems for me. The "best" option now for my use case is the 12 mini, but I agree that the branding cheapens the device. It's like getting a hand-down form my little kids.
    Or, you could just ignore the name and buy one. You will not regret it.
    muthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 17
    Alas Apple is firmly set now on bigger SKUs, which is a shame. I have an iPad when I'm on the go and need a bigger screen. Bigger iPhones solve no problems for me. The "best" option now for my use case is the 12 mini, but I agree that the branding cheapens the device. It's like getting a hand-down form my little kids.
    iPad and iPhone 12 mini goes down well in my world too. 

    Don't really need iPad LTE/5G, but the GPS/Glonas/Galileo is integrated to that module and adds USD 130-200 to the pleasure.

  • Reply 15 of 17
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,076member
    sdw2001 said:
    Secondly, the bulk of sales are the more expensive models, just as the article states.  But isn't that a good thing? That means more of Apple's sales are higher priced, often higher-margin products.  True, it's estimated that the Mini only accounts for 6% of US iPhone sales.  But the question is, where would those hypothetical additional sales come from?  If the share was 20% instead of 6%, that might not be a good thing.  What if it came from more expensive models?  
    That, and not having the cheaper models doesn't mean those would have bought them will get a more expensive iPhone instead. Some would of course, but some would also switch to Android. Much like Mac pricing, not having a cheaper Mac anymore pushes people towards Windows as much as it does toward more expensive Macs.
  • Reply 16 of 17
    Beats said:
    If these figures are close to real it’s obvious why the Mini isn’t selling as well. It’s freaking GIGANTIC!!!

    What a stupid name for an iPhone.




    Which ones Mini??
    none is. Mini has two cameras not three.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 17
    looplessloopless Posts: 194member
    The iPhone 12 mini is a great upgrade from an iPhone 8. Same form factor but significantly more screen real-estate. I love mine over my old iPhone 8. It's a perfect size if you don't want a large phone.
    watto_cobra
Sign In or Register to comment.