Tim Cook says work from home will remain 'very critical' after pandemic ends

Posted:
in AAPL Investors
Tim Cook believes that many companies will continue to employ workers remotely even after coronavirus numbers decrease.

Tim Cook says work from home will remain 'very critical' after pandemic ends


While some believe that working from home is merely a temporary side effect of the pandemic, Apple is betting that remote work will likely outlast the coronavirus.

"Where this pandemic will end, many companies will continue to operate in hybrid mode," Cook said in Wednesday's quarterly earnings call. "Work from home will remain very critical."

Apple has seen record-breaking growth this quarter, with 53.6% growth year-over-year. Outperforming all other devices, iPad has seen growth of over 78% this quarter, likely due to work-from-home and the increased role iPad plays in remote learning.

Mac also saw 70% growth, $9.1 billion in revenue, up from $5.4 billion a year ago. The company noted that the last three quarters were the best ever for Mac.

"The demand feels very strong right now," Cook said of the quarterly performance. "Both on the Mac side, you have the combination of work from home and remote learning. And in iPad, you've got remote learning and work from home as well."

In October, Cook said that Apple saw growth in sales to remote students and home workers and believed that trend would continue.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 15
    Correct. Working from home is now demystified, and companies have seen productivity levels maintained (or exceeded in some cases). Side benefits are greater accessibility for those who have trouble commuting physically or otherwise, fewer cars in the road, lessened need to live in expensive, crowded urban hubs, etc. The greater flexibility is beneficial to companies and employees. We shouldn’t just forget that as the viral risk levels decline.

    Plus some people just hate offices. Hi!
    equality72521GeorgeBMacFileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 15
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 9,269member
    I'm hoping that the technical progress made with cyberschools won't go to waste:  Schools and students have been equipped with the necessary hardware & software and trained in how to use it.

    While it's true that for many cyberschool has been a disaster, it is equally true that much progress has been made so that computers can compliment traditional paper, pencil and textbook type learning.  

    We should look forward to kids using e-books instead of lugging 25 pound bulging back packs around.   And computers automatically grading tests and homework instead of teachers spending valuable education time on such paperwork.  Also, it enables educators to bring in experts from outside of the school district to teach specialty subjects or topics.

    But, there is still a long way to go:  My grandson was doing it all by computer while in cyberschool.   But now that he's back in the classroom he and his class are back to doing things pretty much the same way I did them 60 years ago....

    But, Apple needs to up its game:   to use Apple equipment for cyber type learning the student has to obtain BOTH a Mac and an iPad -- neither by itself is will meet the requirements.  Students need a 2 in 1 to do laptop type work (typing papers, etc...) as well as a tablet with a pencil to do things like solving math equations.   Few schools and parents have the resources or desire to invest in both and few students want to have to lug both around in school.
    edited April 29
  • Reply 3 of 15
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 918member
    I'm hoping that the technical progress made with cyberschools won't go to waste:  Schools and students have been equipped with the necessary hardware & software and trained in how to use it.

    While it's true that for many cyberschool has been a disaster, it is equally true that much progress has been made so that computers can compliment traditional paper, pencil and textbook type learning.  

    We should look forward to kids using e-books instead of lugging 25 pound bulging back packs around.   And computers automatically grading tests and homework instead of teachers spending valuable education time on such paperwork.  Also, it enables educators to bring in experts from outside of the school district to teach specialty subjects or topics.

    But, there is still a long way to go:  My grandson was doing it all by computer while in cyberschool.   But now that he's back in the classroom he and his class are back to doing things pretty much the same way I did them 60 years ago....

    But, Apple needs to up its game:   to use Apple equipment for cyber type learning the student has to obtain BOTH a Mac and an iPad -- neither by itself is will meet the requirements.  Students need a 2 in 1 to do laptop type work (typing papers, etc...) as well as a tablet with a pencil to do things like solving math equations.   Few schools and parents have the resources or desire to invest in both and few students want to have to lug both around in school.
    We've been over this. Apple isn't going to do that. They've said it, they've said it again, and then they said it again after that. I think this is what you're looking for right here.
    crowleywatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 15
    crowleycrowley Posts: 7,639member
    AppleZulu said:
    I'm hoping that the technical progress made with cyberschools won't go to waste:  Schools and students have been equipped with the necessary hardware & software and trained in how to use it.

    While it's true that for many cyberschool has been a disaster, it is equally true that much progress has been made so that computers can compliment traditional paper, pencil and textbook type learning.  

    We should look forward to kids using e-books instead of lugging 25 pound bulging back packs around.   And computers automatically grading tests and homework instead of teachers spending valuable education time on such paperwork.  Also, it enables educators to bring in experts from outside of the school district to teach specialty subjects or topics.

    But, there is still a long way to go:  My grandson was doing it all by computer while in cyberschool.   But now that he's back in the classroom he and his class are back to doing things pretty much the same way I did them 60 years ago....

    But, Apple needs to up its game:   to use Apple equipment for cyber type learning the student has to obtain BOTH a Mac and an iPad -- neither by itself is will meet the requirements.  Students need a 2 in 1 to do laptop type work (typing papers, etc...) as well as a tablet with a pencil to do things like solving math equations.   Few schools and parents have the resources or desire to invest in both and few students want to have to lug both around in school.
    We've been over this. Apple isn't going to do that. They've said it, they've said it again, and then they said it again after that. I think this is what you're looking for right here.
    If it's just typing up papers then one of these will do just fine https://www.apple.com/uk/shop/ipad/accessories/keyboards
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 15
    While I do miss the ease of collaborating with my peers and the insights that can occur in those accidental hallway conversations, I sure have been enjoying WFH. No commute and the comfort of life in my quiet neighborhood in the hills has been really nice. I feel super lucky to have been able to do this.

    I am definitely going to be negotiating with my employer for a hybrid work arrangement once return to office full time takes place. Only problem I see is that I will need to bring my office equipment back (mainly 27" 5K iMac), so I will have to update my personal tech to re-establish a home office set up. My employer won't likely provide two sets of computers--it's either desktop or laptop, not both. Maybe I can turn in the work iMac for a work laptop, but I'd just as soon get my own laptop--I'm overdue for an upgrade. Just not looking forward to the expense though.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 15
    While I do miss the ease of collaborating with my peers and the insights that can occur in those accidental hallway conversations, I sure have been enjoying WFH. No commute and the comfort of life in my quiet neighborhood in the hills has been really nice. I feel super lucky to have been able to do this.

    I am definitely going to be negotiating with my employer for a hybrid work arrangement once return to office full time takes place. Only problem I see is that I will need to bring my office equipment back (mainly 27" 5K iMac), so I will have to update my personal tech to re-establish a home office set up. My employer won't likely provide two sets of computers--it's either desktop or laptop, not both. Maybe I can turn in the work iMac for a work laptop, but I'd just as soon get my own laptop--I'm overdue for an upgrade. Just not looking forward to the expense though.
    I'm saving AU$80+ a week just in petrol costs by working from home rather than driving for 3+ hours a day. I've got no issue with needing to furnish my own home office - although I already had a good setup in place from when I was doing freelance work.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 15
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 9,269member
    crowley said:
    AppleZulu said:
    I'm hoping that the technical progress made with cyberschools won't go to waste:  Schools and students have been equipped with the necessary hardware & software and trained in how to use it.

    While it's true that for many cyberschool has been a disaster, it is equally true that much progress has been made so that computers can compliment traditional paper, pencil and textbook type learning.  

    We should look forward to kids using e-books instead of lugging 25 pound bulging back packs around.   And computers automatically grading tests and homework instead of teachers spending valuable education time on such paperwork.  Also, it enables educators to bring in experts from outside of the school district to teach specialty subjects or topics.

    But, there is still a long way to go:  My grandson was doing it all by computer while in cyberschool.   But now that he's back in the classroom he and his class are back to doing things pretty much the same way I did them 60 years ago....

    But, Apple needs to up its game:   to use Apple equipment for cyber type learning the student has to obtain BOTH a Mac and an iPad -- neither by itself is will meet the requirements.  Students need a 2 in 1 to do laptop type work (typing papers, etc...) as well as a tablet with a pencil to do things like solving math equations.   Few schools and parents have the resources or desire to invest in both and few students want to have to lug both around in school.
    We've been over this. Apple isn't going to do that. They've said it, they've said it again, and then they said it again after that. I think this is what you're looking for right here.
    If it's just typing up papers then one of these will do just fine https://www.apple.com/uk/shop/ipad/accessories/keyboards

    Except they don't because of the shitty OS.
  • Reply 8 of 15
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 9,269member
    AppleZulu said:
    I'm hoping that the technical progress made with cyberschools won't go to waste:  Schools and students have been equipped with the necessary hardware & software and trained in how to use it.

    While it's true that for many cyberschool has been a disaster, it is equally true that much progress has been made so that computers can compliment traditional paper, pencil and textbook type learning.  

    We should look forward to kids using e-books instead of lugging 25 pound bulging back packs around.   And computers automatically grading tests and homework instead of teachers spending valuable education time on such paperwork.  Also, it enables educators to bring in experts from outside of the school district to teach specialty subjects or topics.

    But, there is still a long way to go:  My grandson was doing it all by computer while in cyberschool.   But now that he's back in the classroom he and his class are back to doing things pretty much the same way I did them 60 years ago....

    But, Apple needs to up its game:   to use Apple equipment for cyber type learning the student has to obtain BOTH a Mac and an iPad -- neither by itself is will meet the requirements.  Students need a 2 in 1 to do laptop type work (typing papers, etc...) as well as a tablet with a pencil to do things like solving math equations.   Few schools and parents have the resources or desire to invest in both and few students want to have to lug both around in school.
    We've been over this. Apple isn't going to do that. They've said it, they've said it again, and then they said it again after that. I think this is what you're looking for right here.

    I think Apple needs to do that if they want to serve their customers.   Or, they can say "screw them".
  • Reply 9 of 15
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 9,269member
    While I do miss the ease of collaborating with my peers and the insights that can occur in those accidental hallway conversations, I sure have been enjoying WFH. No commute and the comfort of life in my quiet neighborhood in the hills has been really nice. I feel super lucky to have been able to do this.

    I am definitely going to be negotiating with my employer for a hybrid work arrangement once return to office full time takes place. Only problem I see is that I will need to bring my office equipment back (mainly 27" 5K iMac), so I will have to update my personal tech to re-establish a home office set up. My employer won't likely provide two sets of computers--it's either desktop or laptop, not both. Maybe I can turn in the work iMac for a work laptop, but I'd just as soon get my own laptop--I'm overdue for an upgrade. Just not looking forward to the expense though.
    Yeh, in my experience, the employee always bought his own home equipment.  But a work laptop, if it will do the job sounds like it might cover both for you -- or maybe you'll just have to get a monitor for a larger screen.

    I think many will be going with the hybrid model.  
    And, that will solve another societal problem, Women:  It is correctly said that they do not receive the pay or promotions that their male counterparts do.   And, a big part of that (I think) is that they are usually the ones burdened with childcare responsibilities.   If the kid gets sick it is the woman who stays home & take care of it   A hybrid model would give her the flexibility to stay home with the kid and do her job.    I hope that model flourishes.
    muthuk_vanalingamroundaboutnow
  • Reply 10 of 15
    crowleycrowley Posts: 7,639member
    crowley said:
    AppleZulu said:
    I'm hoping that the technical progress made with cyberschools won't go to waste:  Schools and students have been equipped with the necessary hardware & software and trained in how to use it.

    While it's true that for many cyberschool has been a disaster, it is equally true that much progress has been made so that computers can compliment traditional paper, pencil and textbook type learning.  

    We should look forward to kids using e-books instead of lugging 25 pound bulging back packs around.   And computers automatically grading tests and homework instead of teachers spending valuable education time on such paperwork.  Also, it enables educators to bring in experts from outside of the school district to teach specialty subjects or topics.

    But, there is still a long way to go:  My grandson was doing it all by computer while in cyberschool.   But now that he's back in the classroom he and his class are back to doing things pretty much the same way I did them 60 years ago....

    But, Apple needs to up its game:   to use Apple equipment for cyber type learning the student has to obtain BOTH a Mac and an iPad -- neither by itself is will meet the requirements.  Students need a 2 in 1 to do laptop type work (typing papers, etc...) as well as a tablet with a pencil to do things like solving math equations.   Few schools and parents have the resources or desire to invest in both and few students want to have to lug both around in school.
    We've been over this. Apple isn't going to do that. They've said it, they've said it again, and then they said it again after that. I think this is what you're looking for right here.
    If it's just typing up papers then one of these will do just fine https://www.apple.com/uk/shop/ipad/accessories/keyboards
    Except they don't because of the shitty OS.
    iPadOS is perfectly fine and capable for typing up papers.
    AppleZuluwatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 15
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 918member
    AppleZulu said:
    I'm hoping that the technical progress made with cyberschools won't go to waste:  Schools and students have been equipped with the necessary hardware & software and trained in how to use it.

    While it's true that for many cyberschool has been a disaster, it is equally true that much progress has been made so that computers can compliment traditional paper, pencil and textbook type learning.  

    We should look forward to kids using e-books instead of lugging 25 pound bulging back packs around.   And computers automatically grading tests and homework instead of teachers spending valuable education time on such paperwork.  Also, it enables educators to bring in experts from outside of the school district to teach specialty subjects or topics.

    But, there is still a long way to go:  My grandson was doing it all by computer while in cyberschool.   But now that he's back in the classroom he and his class are back to doing things pretty much the same way I did them 60 years ago....

    But, Apple needs to up its game:   to use Apple equipment for cyber type learning the student has to obtain BOTH a Mac and an iPad -- neither by itself is will meet the requirements.  Students need a 2 in 1 to do laptop type work (typing papers, etc...) as well as a tablet with a pencil to do things like solving math equations.   Few schools and parents have the resources or desire to invest in both and few students want to have to lug both around in school.
    We've been over this. Apple isn't going to do that. They've said it, they've said it again, and then they said it again after that. I think this is what you're looking for right here.

    I think Apple needs to do that if they want to serve their customers.   Or, they can say "screw them".
    We’re well aware you think that. Though you seem to believe otherwise, you don’t actually represent all Apple customers, or apparently even a significant minority of them. 

    Your critique right above of iPadOS is not consistent with the sizable number of Apple customers who buy iPads and then report extremely high levels of customer satisfaction. Though Apple doesn’t generally pursue market share dominance, in the case of tablet computing, they have it with iPad. Were Apple somehow neglecting consumer demand, this wouldn’t be the case. MS Surface and other 2 in 1 devices would dominate, and provide evidence that there’s unmet demand for what you want. That evidence just isn’t there. 

    Given all that, it would seem that Apple actually is serving their customers with the iPads that sell so well. It would also seem that if they changed those devices that people like so well, complicating them to include a bloatware 2 in 1 OS, or worse, the convoluted auto swapping dual OS scheme you’ve envisioned elsewhere, that would be the way of saying “screw them” to the millions of customers who very much like the iPads Apple currently makes. 
    edited April 30 watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 15
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 9,269member
    crowley said:
    crowley said:
    AppleZulu said:
    I'm hoping that the technical progress made with cyberschools won't go to waste:  Schools and students have been equipped with the necessary hardware & software and trained in how to use it.

    While it's true that for many cyberschool has been a disaster, it is equally true that much progress has been made so that computers can compliment traditional paper, pencil and textbook type learning.  

    We should look forward to kids using e-books instead of lugging 25 pound bulging back packs around.   And computers automatically grading tests and homework instead of teachers spending valuable education time on such paperwork.  Also, it enables educators to bring in experts from outside of the school district to teach specialty subjects or topics.

    But, there is still a long way to go:  My grandson was doing it all by computer while in cyberschool.   But now that he's back in the classroom he and his class are back to doing things pretty much the same way I did them 60 years ago....

    But, Apple needs to up its game:   to use Apple equipment for cyber type learning the student has to obtain BOTH a Mac and an iPad -- neither by itself is will meet the requirements.  Students need a 2 in 1 to do laptop type work (typing papers, etc...) as well as a tablet with a pencil to do things like solving math equations.   Few schools and parents have the resources or desire to invest in both and few students want to have to lug both around in school.
    We've been over this. Apple isn't going to do that. They've said it, they've said it again, and then they said it again after that. I think this is what you're looking for right here.
    If it's just typing up papers then one of these will do just fine https://www.apple.com/uk/shop/ipad/accessories/keyboards
    Except they don't because of the shitty OS.
    iPadOS is perfectly fine and capable for typing up papers.

    It sucks when in laptop mode --except, as you point out, for the most simply, basic tasks.  It just can't measure up to MacOS.  Not even close.  Yet.   Well, it has gotten closer.  But it still has a long way to go.
  • Reply 13 of 15
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 9,269member
    AppleZulu said:
    AppleZulu said:
    I'm hoping that the technical progress made with cyberschools won't go to waste:  Schools and students have been equipped with the necessary hardware & software and trained in how to use it.

    While it's true that for many cyberschool has been a disaster, it is equally true that much progress has been made so that computers can compliment traditional paper, pencil and textbook type learning.  

    We should look forward to kids using e-books instead of lugging 25 pound bulging back packs around.   And computers automatically grading tests and homework instead of teachers spending valuable education time on such paperwork.  Also, it enables educators to bring in experts from outside of the school district to teach specialty subjects or topics.

    But, there is still a long way to go:  My grandson was doing it all by computer while in cyberschool.   But now that he's back in the classroom he and his class are back to doing things pretty much the same way I did them 60 years ago....

    But, Apple needs to up its game:   to use Apple equipment for cyber type learning the student has to obtain BOTH a Mac and an iPad -- neither by itself is will meet the requirements.  Students need a 2 in 1 to do laptop type work (typing papers, etc...) as well as a tablet with a pencil to do things like solving math equations.   Few schools and parents have the resources or desire to invest in both and few students want to have to lug both around in school.
    We've been over this. Apple isn't going to do that. They've said it, they've said it again, and then they said it again after that. I think this is what you're looking for right here.

    I think Apple needs to do that if they want to serve their customers.   Or, they can say "screw them".
    We’re well aware you think that. Though you seem to believe otherwise, you don’t actually represent all Apple customers,
    You might address that to yourself.

    As for the rest....  That's called circular logic:   the majority of iPad customers don't buy it as a laptop replacement -- because it isn't very good as a laptop replacement.  While, as has been pointed out, that is fairly easily fixed Apple has not fully addressed the problem   They've made advances by enhancing its file system and adding a cursor.  But they still have very far to go.

    I'm waiting for them to get off their butts in gear.

  • Reply 14 of 15
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 918member
    AppleZulu said:
    AppleZulu said:
    I'm hoping that the technical progress made with cyberschools won't go to waste:  Schools and students have been equipped with the necessary hardware & software and trained in how to use it.

    While it's true that for many cyberschool has been a disaster, it is equally true that much progress has been made so that computers can compliment traditional paper, pencil and textbook type learning.  

    We should look forward to kids using e-books instead of lugging 25 pound bulging back packs around.   And computers automatically grading tests and homework instead of teachers spending valuable education time on such paperwork.  Also, it enables educators to bring in experts from outside of the school district to teach specialty subjects or topics.

    But, there is still a long way to go:  My grandson was doing it all by computer while in cyberschool.   But now that he's back in the classroom he and his class are back to doing things pretty much the same way I did them 60 years ago....

    But, Apple needs to up its game:   to use Apple equipment for cyber type learning the student has to obtain BOTH a Mac and an iPad -- neither by itself is will meet the requirements.  Students need a 2 in 1 to do laptop type work (typing papers, etc...) as well as a tablet with a pencil to do things like solving math equations.   Few schools and parents have the resources or desire to invest in both and few students want to have to lug both around in school.
    We've been over this. Apple isn't going to do that. They've said it, they've said it again, and then they said it again after that. I think this is what you're looking for right here.

    I think Apple needs to do that if they want to serve their customers.   Or, they can say "screw them".
    We’re well aware you think that. Though you seem to believe otherwise, you don’t actually represent all Apple customers,
    You might address that to yourself.

    As for the rest....  That's called circular logic:   the majority of iPad customers don't buy it as a laptop replacement -- because it isn't very good as a laptop replacement.  While, as has been pointed out, that is fairly easily fixed Apple has not fully addressed the problem   They've made advances by enhancing its file system and adding a cursor.  But they still have very far to go.

    I'm waiting for them to get off their butts in gear.

    I don’t claim to represent all or most Apple customers. I cited evidence of their behavior and reported customer satisfaction, letting them represent themselves. 

    My logic isn’t circular, either. I cited evidence that sales and market share of 2 for 1 devices doesn’t demonstrate outsized consumer demand for those items. People aren’t switching from Apple in large numbers to get a Surface hybrid. High sales and customer satisfaction among Apple customers for both iPads and laptops is a pretty good indication that purchasers of those devices aren’t somehow unfulfilled because they didn’t get something else. 

    I don’t know quite what “get off their butts in gear” means, but you’ll keep waiting if you’re talking about getting an Apple tablet/notebook hybrid. They’ve clearly and repeatedly said no to that. Sometimes no means no. You would be wise to learn that. 


    watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 15
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 9,269member
    AppleZulu said:
    AppleZulu said:
    AppleZulu said:
    I'm hoping that the technical progress made with cyberschools won't go to waste:  Schools and students have been equipped with the necessary hardware & software and trained in how to use it.

    While it's true that for many cyberschool has been a disaster, it is equally true that much progress has been made so that computers can compliment traditional paper, pencil and textbook type learning.  

    We should look forward to kids using e-books instead of lugging 25 pound bulging back packs around.   And computers automatically grading tests and homework instead of teachers spending valuable education time on such paperwork.  Also, it enables educators to bring in experts from outside of the school district to teach specialty subjects or topics.

    But, there is still a long way to go:  My grandson was doing it all by computer while in cyberschool.   But now that he's back in the classroom he and his class are back to doing things pretty much the same way I did them 60 years ago....

    But, Apple needs to up its game:   to use Apple equipment for cyber type learning the student has to obtain BOTH a Mac and an iPad -- neither by itself is will meet the requirements.  Students need a 2 in 1 to do laptop type work (typing papers, etc...) as well as a tablet with a pencil to do things like solving math equations.   Few schools and parents have the resources or desire to invest in both and few students want to have to lug both around in school.
    We've been over this. Apple isn't going to do that. They've said it, they've said it again, and then they said it again after that. I think this is what you're looking for right here.

    I think Apple needs to do that if they want to serve their customers.   Or, they can say "screw them".
    We’re well aware you think that. Though you seem to believe otherwise, you don’t actually represent all Apple customers,
    You might address that to yourself.

    As for the rest....  That's called circular logic:   the majority of iPad customers don't buy it as a laptop replacement -- because it isn't very good as a laptop replacement.  While, as has been pointed out, that is fairly easily fixed Apple has not fully addressed the problem   They've made advances by enhancing its file system and adding a cursor.  But they still have very far to go.

    I'm waiting for them to get off their butts in gear.

    I don’t claim to represent all or most Apple customers.
    ....
    Neither did I.

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