Latest Linux kernel introduces preliminary Apple M1 support

Posted:
in General Discussion
The latest version of the Linux kernel, Linux 5.13, introduces support for Apple's M1 system-on-chip and is now available as a release candidate.

Credit: Apple
Credit: Apple


Apple M1 support was previously reported for Linux 5.13, though no release date was mentioned at the time. On Tuesday, however, Linux kernel principal developer Linus Torvalds announced that the release candidate version is now available for public testing.

Although security researchers have successfully booted Linux on Apple Silicon in the past, it required some fairly technical workarounds. With preliminary support in Linux 5.13, Linux distributions and systems will have a much easier time running on Apple's SoC.

In addition to the Apple Silicon support, Linux kernel 5.13 also introduces a slew of new and updated drivers and other under-the-hood improvements to the file system, architectures, tooling, and process handling, among other new updates.

According to 9to5Linux, the final version of Linux 5.13 should release to the public at the end of June or in early July. That depends on how many release candidates Torvalds decides to release during the development cycle.

The Linux kernel is an open source system kernel created by Torvalds in 1991. It forms the basis for a variety of Linux operating system distributions, and is also deployed in servers, mainframes, and on mobile devices. Android, for example, is based on a modified version of the kernel.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 8
    ivanhivanh Posts: 564member
    very good news. I can buy the M1, M1X or M2 MBP soon!
  • Reply 2 of 8
    mikeincamikeinca Posts: 10member
    I don’t understand why Apple doesn’t hire 1 measly person, let alone a tiny team, with their billions to help w Linux on the M platform.   Maybe it’s an Intellectual property thing.  I’m not an expert in this stuff.  
    williamlondon
  • Reply 3 of 8
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,110member
    mikeinca said:
    I don’t understand why Apple doesn’t hire 1 measly person, let alone a tiny team, with their billions to help w Linux on the M platform.   Maybe it’s an Intellectual property thing.  I’m not an expert in this stuff.  
    Because it’s simply not worth the effort to do so when there is almost no reason for Linux to run on Macs. The tiny percentage of fake techies who demand it are easily ignored. If Torvalds wants Linux to run on Apple silicon that’s his business, not Apple’s. Same goes for Windows on M series Macs. That’s Microsoft’s business, not Apple’s. The claims from both camps that without Linux and Windows the Mac platform will shrink to nothingness are hilarious. 
    williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 8
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 5,604member
    mikeinca said:
    I don’t understand why Apple doesn’t hire 1 measly person, let alone a tiny team, with their billions to help w Linux on the M platform.   Maybe it’s an Intellectual property thing.  I’m not an expert in this stuff.  
    It makes zero sense to expect Apple to allocate any resources to help development of a competing OS.  Zero... and I run Linux on my (Intel) Mac too.  In time, there will be an army of devs that will get it running without Apple's assistance.


    thtwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 8
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 5,604member
    lkrupp said:
     The claims from both camps that without Linux and Windows the Mac platform will shrink to nothingness are hilarious. 
    Who is claiming that?  Haven't read any of that.  

    Granted, I bought a top-of-the-line 2020 iMac back in August primarily because I knew it would be my last Intel-based Mac, and I still need Windows compatibility for work so I kind of fall into that camp.  By the time I need to get a new Mac, I will have (hopefully) moved on from Windows and Apple will have solidified their ASi products.  Maybe Microsoft will eventually allow their Windows10 ARM to be available outside of their Surface products.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 8
    XedXed Posts: 883member
    sflocal said:
    mikeinca said:
    I don’t understand why Apple doesn’t hire 1 measly person, let alone a tiny team, with their billions to help w Linux on the M platform.   Maybe it’s an Intellectual property thing.  I’m not an expert in this stuff.  
    It makes zero sense to expect Apple to allocate any resources to help development of a competing OS.  Zero... and I run Linux on my (Intel) Mac too.  In time, there will be an army of devs that will get it running without Apple's assistance.
    It makes a little sense if you come at it from the point (which I don't know is substantiated or not) that profits from Macs sales would increase substantially that it would be a net gain over the cost of a dedicated Linux team. Now I doubt that's the case, but that could be argued.

    The "zero sense" argument came from the guy (I won't name names) that claimed it was Apple's responsibly to create a licensing program for Windows ARM.
    osmartormenajrwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 8
    XedXed Posts: 883member
    sflocal said:
    lkrupp said:
     The claims from both camps that without Linux and Windows the Mac platform will shrink to nothingness are hilarious. 
    Who is claiming that?  Haven't read any of that.  

    Granted, I bought a top-of-the-line 2020 iMac back in August primarily because I knew it would be my last Intel-based Mac, and I still need Windows compatibility for work so I kind of fall into that camp.  By the time I need to get a new Mac, I will have (hopefully) moved on from Windows and Apple will have solidified their ASi products.  Maybe Microsoft will eventually allow their Windows10 ARM to be available outside of their Surface products.
    That was/is the biggest talking point for the people against Apple moving from Intel to ARM. Even the writers at AL have chimed in on the forums to note that dual-booting and  VMs are not propping up Mac sales even if a few people on tech forums want to believe that's the only reason people buy Macs.

    I've even stated back when this architecture transition was just a rumor that I suspect we'll see an upsurge in Macs sales once they move to Apple Silicon because of its inherent benefits in performance-per-watt and cost. Once it was officially announced I predicted it would do even more for Mac sales than the Get A Mac campaign because of the ability to run iOS and iPadOS apps, which will make the transition for many who are using old Windows machines with an iPhone and/or iPad even easier than previously expected.

    I really hope we see 16" MBPs at WWDC next month.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 8
    coolfactorcoolfactor Posts: 1,801member
    mikeinca said:
    I don’t understand why Apple doesn’t hire 1 measly person, let alone a tiny team, with their billions to help w Linux on the M platform.   Maybe it’s an Intellectual property thing.  I’m not an expert in this stuff.  

    Linux is a derivative or offshoot of UNIX. macOS is a certified UNIX operating system under the hood. You can jump into the Terminal application and start writing text commands to do things that your mouse can do with a few clicks.

    There's little motivation to bring Linux to the Mac because you can already do (nearly) everything on a Mac directly. Many software packages are distributed for both operating systems, or can be built on-demand as needed.

    For exampple, I run PHP-based website servers on a dozen Ubuntu (flavour of Linux) machines. I also run this same stuff on my Mac. All of these packages are installed exactly the same way, even though they are built for different architectures.
    caladanianwatto_cobra
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