Apple dips below Samsung in annual smartphone customer satisfaction index

Posted:
in iPhone
Apple has fallen below Samsung in customer satisfaction among U.S. consumers for the first time in years, according to the results of a new consumer satisfaction index.

Credit: Andrew O'Hara, AppleInsider
Credit: Andrew O'Hara, AppleInsider


Samsung's retained an American Consumer Satisfaction Index score of 81 in 2020, the same score it had a year prior. However, Apple's score dropped 2% year-over-year to 80, landing it in a three-way tie with Motorola and Google.

Credit: ACSI
Credit: ACSI


The South Korean smartphone maker also nabbed the five highest-rated smartphone models in the U.S. The Galaxy Note 10+, Galaxy S10+, and Galaxy S20+ tied for first place with ASCI scores of 85.

Samsung's Galaxy S20 and Galaxy A20 were next in line with scores of 84 and 83, respectively. Apple's iPhone 11 Pro, iPhone 11 Pro Max, iPhone X, and iPhone XS tied with the Galaxy S10 with ASCI scores of 82.

Credit: ACSI
Credit: ACSI


Other Apple devices on the list included the iPhone 11 and iPhone 8 Plus, which had scores of 80, and the iPhone 8 and iPhone SE with scores of 79. The iPhone 7 ranked list in the lineup with a score of 75.

Among respondents in the survey, the top criteria for judging a smartphone included ease of text messaging in first place, followed by ease of phone calling, phone design, and audio quality.

The ASCI survey also ranks wireless phone service providers. Compared to a year prior, AT&T achieved an ASCI score of 74, tying with Verizon Wireless. T-Mobile's ASCI score dropped from 76 in 2020 to 72 in 2021. U.S. Cellular came in fourth with a score of 69, while Sprint is no longer part of the ranking.

ASCI's 2020 to 2021 data is based on interviews with 21,189 U.S. consumers carried out between April 1, 2020 and March 29, 2021.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 836member
    The top 5 rated smartphones in America are all Samsung models?

    Bullshit. 
    omar moralesBeatssdw2001lkrupp
  • Reply 2 of 12
    2morrow2morrow Posts: 3member
    They probably only called people with landlines to do the survey. 
    omar morales
  • Reply 3 of 12
    rcfarcfa Posts: 1,076member
    If ease of text messaging is the top criterion I’m not surprised. Apple needs to educate people about iMessage, and possibly make it cross-platform.

    It happens more and more often that people answer, when I tell them I prefer iMessage over WhatsApp for privacy reasons, that “they/nobody use(s) SMS anymore”. I then have to explain to them, that although iMessage and SMS use the same app, it’s not the same thing, just for convenience using the same app, and that one can see at the input fields and the bubble color, what system is being used.

    As convenient and nicely integrated iMessage is, it’s reach limited to Apple devices starts to backfire, as too few people use it, and thus familiarity with the difference between iMessage and SMS/MMS goes out the window.

    The idea that iMessage would tie people to the Apple platform won’t work, if fewer and fewer people using iPhones don’t use the system because they don’t understand it, and use WhatsApp, or (at least better) Telegram, or if they are paranoid Signal instead. 

    The way to stem that is by increasing its use across other platforms, and use it as a way to demonstrate that Apple cares about all people’s privacy, and so get people interested in other Apple services.
    elijahg
  • Reply 4 of 12
    AniMillAniMill Posts: 30member
    Not surprising. Samsung has constantly improved their products these past years. But also, there’s no iPhone 12 anywhere in the mix. ALL smartphones have become incredible devices with their  OS and cameras as their distinctions.
  • Reply 5 of 12
    flydogflydog Posts: 1,005member
    rcfa said:
    If ease of text messaging is the top criterion I’m not surprised. Apple needs to educate people about iMessage, and possibly make it cross-platform.

    It happens more and more often that people answer, when I tell them I prefer iMessage over WhatsApp for privacy reasons, that “they/nobody use(s) SMS anymore”. I then have to explain to them, that although iMessage and SMS use the same app, it’s not the same thing, just for convenience using the same app, and that one can see at the input fields and the bubble color, what system is being used.

    As convenient and nicely integrated iMessage is, it’s reach limited to Apple devices starts to backfire, as too few people use it, and thus familiarity with the difference between iMessage and SMS/MMS goes out the window.

    The idea that iMessage would tie people to the Apple platform won’t work, if fewer and fewer people using iPhones don’t use the system because they don’t understand it, and use WhatsApp, or (at least better) Telegram, or if they are paranoid Signal instead. 

    The way to stem that is by increasing its use across other platforms, and use it as a way to demonstrate that Apple cares about all people’s privacy, and so get people interested in other Apple services.
    I don't know what's so difficult.  Type, then hit send.  The bubbles could be blue, green, purple, or pink, or they could be squares with dancing unicorns.  Works the same way, no thinking required. 

    CloudTalkinBeatspulseimagesGRKosturapplguysdw2001
  • Reply 6 of 12
    dcgoodcgoo Posts: 247member
    AniMill said:
    Not surprising. Samsung has constantly improved their products these past years. But also, there’s no iPhone 12 anywhere in the mix. ALL smartphones have become incredible devices with their  OS and cameras as their distinctions.
    The iPhone 12 was not available when this survey was completed (2020)
    pulseimagesGRKostursdw2001
  • Reply 7 of 12
    BeatsBeats Posts: 2,527member
    With Sammy’s crap software on their knockoff iPhones and real iPhones having amazing services like FaceTime, Apple should be ashamed of themselves here who otherwise are #1 in every category.
  • Reply 8 of 12
    BeatsBeats Posts: 2,527member
    flydog said:
    rcfa said:
    If ease of text messaging is the top criterion I’m not surprised. Apple needs to educate people about iMessage, and possibly make it cross-platform.

    It happens more and more often that people answer, when I tell them I prefer iMessage over WhatsApp for privacy reasons, that “they/nobody use(s) SMS anymore”. I then have to explain to them, that although iMessage and SMS use the same app, it’s not the same thing, just for convenience using the same app, and that one can see at the input fields and the bubble color, what system is being used.

    As convenient and nicely integrated iMessage is, it’s reach limited to Apple devices starts to backfire, as too few people use it, and thus familiarity with the difference between iMessage and SMS/MMS goes out the window.

    The idea that iMessage would tie people to the Apple platform won’t work, if fewer and fewer people using iPhones don’t use the system because they don’t understand it, and use WhatsApp, or (at least better) Telegram, or if they are paranoid Signal instead. 

    The way to stem that is by increasing its use across other platforms, and use it as a way to demonstrate that Apple cares about all people’s privacy, and so get people interested in other Apple services.
    I don't know what's so difficult.  Type, then hit send.  The bubbles could be blue, green, purple, or pink, or they could be squares with dancing unicorns.  Works the same way, no thinking required. 


    It’s not hard and Apple should make iMessage/FaceTime a subscription for $.99/month for iKnockoff users.
    GRKosturargonaut
  • Reply 9 of 12
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 17,670member
    rcfa said:
    If ease of text messaging is the top criterion I’m not surprised. Apple needs to educate people about iMessage, and possibly make it cross-platform.

    It happens more and more often that people answer, when I tell them I prefer iMessage over WhatsApp for privacy reasons, that “they/nobody use(s) SMS anymore”. I then have to explain to them, that although iMessage and SMS use the same app, it’s not the same thing, just for convenience using the same app, and that one can see at the input fields and the bubble color, what system is being used.

    As convenient and nicely integrated iMessage is, it’s reach limited to Apple devices starts to backfire, as too few people use it, and thus familiarity with the difference between iMessage and SMS/MMS goes out the window.

    The idea that iMessage would tie people to the Apple platform won’t work, if fewer and fewer people using iPhones don’t use the system because they don’t understand it, and use WhatsApp, or (at least better) Telegram, or if they are paranoid Signal instead. 

    The way to stem that is by increasing its use across other platforms, and use it as a way to demonstrate that Apple cares about all people’s privacy, and so get people interested in other Apple services.
    Why would Apple be interested in making iMessage cross-platform?  It's not like they are raking in the dough from it.  It's a feature of the phone, which they make most of their money on at present.  
  • Reply 10 of 12
    CloudTalkinCloudTalkin Posts: 900member
    Beats said:
    flydog said:
    rcfa said:
    If ease of text messaging is the top criterion I’m not surprised. Apple needs to educate people about iMessage, and possibly make it cross-platform.

    It happens more and more often that people answer, when I tell them I prefer iMessage over WhatsApp for privacy reasons, that “they/nobody use(s) SMS anymore”. I then have to explain to them, that although iMessage and SMS use the same app, it’s not the same thing, just for convenience using the same app, and that one can see at the input fields and the bubble color, what system is being used.

    As convenient and nicely integrated iMessage is, it’s reach limited to Apple devices starts to backfire, as too few people use it, and thus familiarity with the difference between iMessage and SMS/MMS goes out the window.

    The idea that iMessage would tie people to the Apple platform won’t work, if fewer and fewer people using iPhones don’t use the system because they don’t understand it, and use WhatsApp, or (at least better) Telegram, or if they are paranoid Signal instead. 

    The way to stem that is by increasing its use across other platforms, and use it as a way to demonstrate that Apple cares about all people’s privacy, and so get people interested in other Apple services.
    I don't know what's so difficult.  Type, then hit send.  The bubbles could be blue, green, purple, or pink, or they could be squares with dancing unicorns.  Works the same way, no thinking required. 


    It’s not hard and Apple should make iMessage/FaceTime a subscription for $.99/month for iKnockoff users.
    A subscription to iMessage/FaceTime wouldn't be an attractive option, imo, to people who have plenty of robust messaging and video apps to choose from already.   You certainly can't use the same marketing strategy to attract users from those platforms.  As evidenced by the numbers, most people don't really care about the underlying platform.  The most used messaging apps in the world are WhatsApp, FB Messenger, and WeChat in China.  All are free, ubiquitous and do exactly what @flydog said.    What would make IM/FT worth paying for to those people?
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 11 of 12
    dee_deedee_dee Posts: 74member
    AniMill said:
    Not surprising. Samsung has constantly improved their products these past years. But also, there’s no iPhone 12 anywhere in the mix. ALL smartphones have become incredible devices with their  OS and cameras as their distinctions.
    Initial quality means nothing. Wait a year from now when they can’t update their Android device anymore. 
  • Reply 12 of 12
    bestkeptsecretbestkeptsecret Posts: 4,047member

              
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