Apple Wallet will support IDs and driver's licenses in iOS 15

Posted:
in General Discussion edited June 8
Apple is vastly expanding the types of cards and documents that can be added to Wallet, including IDs and driver's licenses in certain states and more types of keys.

Credit: Apple
Credit: Apple


The Cupertino tech giant unveiled the iOS 15 Wallet updates on Monday. The most significant new feature is the ability to add information from an ID card in certain supported U.S. states to Wallet on iPhone. Apple says it is working with the U.S. Transportation Security Administration to support the digital identities at airports.

All of the information in Wallet will be stored in a secure and encrypted fashion. Like an actual ID, it will include a person's legal name, date of birth, photo, and Real ID status.

In addition to the support for IDs, Apple is also expanding the types of keys that users can add to Wallet. That includes keys to a smart home lock, keys to hotel rooms, and work badges that can be scanned to gain entry to a workplace.

For example, Hyatt is rolling out its support for digital keys in Wallet to more than 1,000 properties later in 2021.

Follow all of WWDC 2021 with comprehensive AppleInsider coverage of the week-long event from June 7 through June 11, including details on iOS 15, iPadOS 15, watchOS 8, macOS Monterey and more.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 18
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,632member
    There is no chance I will ever use the ID app to voluntarily hand my iPhone to a law enforcement officer.
    williamlondonbeowulfschmidtwatto_cobraBeatsdarkvader
  • Reply 2 of 18
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,573member
    eightzero said:
    There is no chance I will ever use the ID app to voluntarily hand my iPhone to a law enforcement officer.
    In Louisiana we have a hands-off protocol (LEOs take a picture of your ID loaded on your phone in our state's app). It's kinda clunky. But if the ID was loaded into Wallet it would be even better, because the phone can remain locked while allowing review of a card inside it (double-click of Side Button).
    edited June 7 patchythepiratewatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 18
    boxcatcherboxcatcher Posts: 239member
    Curious about: 
     - State support (could easily take years)
     - How a grocery store clerk will accept / validate
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 18
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,573member
    Curious about: 
     - State support (could easily take years)
     - How a grocery store clerk will accept / validate
    States are already moving. Louisiana has its own iOS app, and Mississippi uses Wallet w/ their own layout (QR code, license #, name, etc).

    Our state has established it for official use. We're ready. Just need the tools to catch up.
    williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 18
    boxcatcherboxcatcher Posts: 239member
    States are already moving. Louisiana has its own iOS app, and Mississippi uses Wallet w/ their own layout (QR code, license #, name, etc).

    Our state has established it for official use. We're ready. Just need the tools to catch up.
    A state that built its own app is probably more likely to resist, now, throwing its proprietary app (and supporting validation infrastructure) in the trash.  LAWallet is made superfluous by Apple’s solution — it’ll be the same phenomenon we saw with Apple Pay when that first rolled out.

    Anyways, the value is not needing to carry your ID, and that requires every possible use-case to be covered (bouncer at bar, grocery clerk validating alcohol purchase, police officer, etc.) … going to take a hot minute.

    It’s a great step, but this one is going to be slow.
    edited June 7 watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 18
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,573member
    States are already moving. Louisiana has its own iOS app, and Mississippi uses Wallet w/ their own layout (QR code, license #, name, etc).

    Our state has established it for official use. We're ready. Just need the tools to catch up.
    A state that built its own app is probably more likely to resist, now, throwing its proprietary app (and supporting validation infrastructure) in the trash.  LAWallet is made superfluous by Apple’s solution — it’ll be the same phenomenon we saw with Apple Pay when that first rolled out.

    Anyways, the value is not needing to carry your ID, and that requires every possible use-case to be covered (bouncer at bar, grocery clerk validating alcohol purchase, police officer, etc.) … going to take a hot minute.

    It’s a great step, but this one is going to be slow.
    LAWallet already is being accepted in the state, besides police, by ATC, businesses, etc. It's a thing here. If backwards Louisiana & Mississippi can accept an official state ID via app, it surely won't take others long.

    But yes, LAWallet will be made obsolete when Apple (and later Android I'm sure) bring it to the OS. And...? The state will implement it, just like the state implemented Apple's COVID19 contact tracing. Apps fill the gaps until the OS makes official solutions. The value-add of a solution that works in multiple states is obviously better positioned that every state producing it's own app which doesn't even show up in Wallet and requires unlocking the device.
    williamlondonpatchythepiratewatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 18
    boxcatcherboxcatcher Posts: 239member
    @StrangeDays ;

    I agree with everything you said -- just asserting that it'll be 5+ years before you can legitimately leave your plastic ID home.
    watto_cobraBeats
  • Reply 8 of 18
    macguimacgui Posts: 2,045member
    I still want to see a kiosk mode for presenting ID, so that you can safely let a cop see your phone without he scrolling through it.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 18
    XedXed Posts: 1,028member
    Curious about: 
     - State support (could easily take years)
     - How a grocery store clerk will accept / validate
    Right now a pharmacy validates my state ID by scanning the barcode on the back. I assume this would work the same way. Additionally, the use of NFC (which is how Apple Pay transfers data) could be used to also send that info without the need for using an IR scanner on your display.

    eightzero said:
    There is no chance I will ever use the ID app to voluntarily hand my iPhone to a law enforcement officer.
    Nothing I saw indicated that was how to you would hand over your device.
    boxcatcherpatchythepiratewatto_cobraBeats
  • Reply 10 of 18
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 839member
    macgui said:
    I still want to see a kiosk mode for presenting ID, so that you can safely let a cop see your phone without he scrolling through it.
    Lock phone. Double click the side button to bring up Wallet. Select your ID. Hold it up to be scanned. The end. 
    williamlondonAMcKinlay21watto_cobraBeats
  • Reply 11 of 18
    larryjwlarryjw Posts: 832member
    @StrangeDays ;

    I agree with everything you said -- just asserting that it'll be 5+ years before you can legitimately leave your plastic ID home.
    You're probably correct that it will be 5+ years, but it just takes that long to replace legacy systems -- or add features to legacy systems. 

    When I toured Eastern Europe in 2017, the Apple Watch worked everywhere, where in the US, there was no support anywhere. Where there is little legacy, one can start fresh; with a legacy system, it takes time. 

    The old legacy systems must continue to exist. Not everyone has access to new systems, and many don't trust the new way of doing things -- and I'm not sure they should. We've certainly seen many weaknesses exploited in recent months. But, that won't likely slow the transition down by much. 

    The transition simply can't be stopped -- at minimum, it's as sexy has hell -- if not convenient for many. And, there is plenty of money to be made in the industry. Nobody is going to say no to that. There is no state that will be immune to that pressure. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 18
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 839member
    I think it’s time now to introduce tabs in the wallet app to separate everything into categories instead of presenting it all in one big stack. An identification card tab, a payment card tab, a loyalty card tab, a temporary card tab, a digital key tab, etc…
    watto_cobraBeats
  • Reply 13 of 18
    XedXed Posts: 1,028member
    Japhey said:
    I think it’s time now to introduce tabs in the wallet app to separate everything into categories instead of presenting it all in one big stack. An identification card tab, a payment card tab, a loyalty card tab, a temporary card tab, a digital key tab, etc…
    That's a good idea. I wonder if it's also time to get rid of the layered card effect 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 18
    boxcatcherboxcatcher Posts: 239member
    Xed said:
    Right now a pharmacy validates my state ID by scanning the barcode on the back. I assume this would work the same way. Additionally, the use of NFC (which is how Apple Pay transfers data) could be used to also send that info without the need for using an IR scanner on your display.
    I should have been more clear about the nature of my wondering (about how grocery clerks will validate, etc.) —

    The ISO spec for mobile drivers licenses (mDL), ISO 18013–5, allows for a variety of means to transfer data (WiFi, Bluetooth, etc.), and leverages the OpenID Connect protocol so that the ID holder can grant access to specific pieces of information (similar to to how you can choose what to share when you use “Connect with Facebook”).

    What I’m specifically curious about is whether Apple will provide an app that acts as the “Requestor” — the thing that initiates the request to Apple Wallet that prompts you to share (or not share) information.  This would be super helpful with the transition, because it would give hotel receptionists, club bouncers, rental car agents, etc. the means to “accept” these Digital IDs.

    Every system that is built to take an optical scan of an ID’s barcode (and decode the data therein) will have to be phased over to also support this new data exchange.
    edited June 7 watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 18
    mcswellmcswell Posts: 1member
    What states?

    Also, what happens when you have to show your digital license in another state?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 18
    BeatsBeats Posts: 2,527member
    This was the biggest feature announced as in the biggest game changer.

    I saw this on the news this morning. Everything else at WWDC was ignored on the news. 
  • Reply 17 of 18
    darkvaderdarkvader Posts: 594member
    States are already moving. Louisiana has its own iOS app, and Mississippi uses Wallet w/ their own layout (QR code, license #, name, etc).

    Our state has established it for official use. We're ready. Just need the tools to catch up.
    A state that built its own app is probably more likely to resist, now, throwing its proprietary app (and supporting validation infrastructure) in the trash.  LAWallet is made superfluous by Apple’s solution — it’ll be the same phenomenon we saw with Apple Pay when that first rolled out.

    Anyways, the value is not needing to carry your ID, and that requires every possible use-case to be covered (bouncer at bar, grocery clerk validating alcohol purchase, police officer, etc.) … going to take a hot minute.

    It’s a great step, but this one is going to be slow.
    LAWallet already is being accepted in the state, besides police, by ATC, businesses, etc. It's a thing here. If backwards Louisiana & Mississippi can accept an official state ID via app, it surely won't take others long.

    But yes, LAWallet will be made obsolete when Apple (and later Android I'm sure) bring it to the OS. And...? The state will implement it, just like the state implemented Apple's COVID19 contact tracing. Apps fill the gaps until the OS makes official solutions. The value-add of a solution that works in multiple states is obviously better positioned that every state producing it's own app which doesn't even show up in Wallet and requires unlocking the device.

    Oh, then I've got nothing to worry about, because my state never implemented any COVID-19 tracing app.

    There is no way I will EVER willingly hand my phone to a cop.  That's not a bright thing to do.  If you have a chance, start your phone recording audio and video (Ideally using an app like Copwatch that uploads it to a server immediately) and then put your phone in emergency lock mode so your fingerprint or face can't unlock it.  Cops are not allowed to force you to give them a passcode, they can force your fingerprint or face.
  • Reply 18 of 18
    XedXed Posts: 1,028member
    darkvader said:
    States are already moving. Louisiana has its own iOS app, and Mississippi uses Wallet w/ their own layout (QR code, license #, name, etc).

    Our state has established it for official use. We're ready. Just need the tools to catch up.
    A state that built its own app is probably more likely to resist, now, throwing its proprietary app (and supporting validation infrastructure) in the trash.  LAWallet is made superfluous by Apple’s solution — it’ll be the same phenomenon we saw with Apple Pay when that first rolled out.

    Anyways, the value is not needing to carry your ID, and that requires every possible use-case to be covered (bouncer at bar, grocery clerk validating alcohol purchase, police officer, etc.) … going to take a hot minute.

    It’s a great step, but this one is going to be slow.
    LAWallet already is being accepted in the state, besides police, by ATC, businesses, etc. It's a thing here. If backwards Louisiana & Mississippi can accept an official state ID via app, it surely won't take others long.

    But yes, LAWallet will be made obsolete when Apple (and later Android I'm sure) bring it to the OS. And...? The state will implement it, just like the state implemented Apple's COVID19 contact tracing. Apps fill the gaps until the OS makes official solutions. The value-add of a solution that works in multiple states is obviously better positioned that every state producing it's own app which doesn't even show up in Wallet and requires unlocking the device.

    Oh, then I've got nothing to worry about, because my state never implemented any COVID-19 tracing app.

    There is no way I will EVER willingly hand my phone to a cop.  That's not a bright thing to do.  If you have a chance, start your phone recording audio and video (Ideally using an app like Copwatch that uploads it to a server immediately) and then put your phone in emergency lock mode so your fingerprint or face can't unlock it.  Cops are not allowed to force you to give them a passcode, they can force your fingerprint or face.
    I have the maximum number of credit/debit cards, various membership cards, and revolving tickets types (usually for airlines) in Wallet and not once have I ever had to hand over my iPhone to someone else to use it. To put another way, stop trolling.
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