Newsletter publishers concerned Apple's Mail Privacy Protection will crater industry

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 22
    nicholfdnicholfd Posts: 608member
    Xed said:
    nicholfd said:
    Xed said:
    cpsro said:
    It’s always bothered me that “Load Remote Images” defaulted to Yes/On when configuring new accounts in Mail, on all Apple platforms. For a company that more recently claimed to care about privacy, this seemed like a real boner of an error. Users had to remember to disable the feature and decipher which emails were at least safe, if even interesting, to load images.
    With iOS 15 that won’t seem to matter. Ahhhh… relief. Thank you, Apple.
    Publishers can perhaps partially mitigate their issues by including a “like” button, for users to express themselves and create a trackable action.
    I understand your reasons for not wanting it, but I think Apple made the correct choice over setting it up to default to offer incomplete mail content. If it was set to off I think more than likely people would assume that Mail was broken and would seek out a 3rd-party app that would not have that feature on (or at all) and also be tracking and selling your data via the app itself.

    Just as an experiment since it has been years since I've had to mess with Mail settings, I toggled the switch in settings and found that emails from local groups that are in no way nefarious were woefully incomplete with "Load remote content for messages" disabled.

    I'm glad Apple has a solid plan for increasing this aspect of privacy this year. I remember iTools's mac.com emails and then MobileMe's me.com emails would get copious amounts of spam—perhaps not as bad as Hotmail and other sites did, but they were far from what Gmail was offering users then. Today it seems like Gmail and iCloud mail push very little spam to me. I can count on one hand how many I get combined in a month. Hell, I get more random iMessage spam these days than I do email spam.
    How do you know the e-mails from local groups were not nefarious?  Many group mailings use a service.  Those services do data tracking.  If they are using a service, there is probably tracking.  Looks at the raw data of the e-mail (if you know how) - I bet you'll find it.
    I don't consider the blanket notion of tracking as being a nefarious action. Do you consider Apple nefarious? I don't, just as I don't consider mailers I've subscribe to nefarious simply because they or a service they use want analysts on who's reading their content. What I consider nefarious unsolicited spam, scams, and worse.
    You missed my point - you do not know what they (newsletter creator  and/or service) are doing.  They could be selling your information.  They could be building a profile.  And all of this without asking for your consent.
    williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 22
    XedXed Posts: 976member
    nicholfd said:
    Xed said:
    nicholfd said:
    Xed said:
    cpsro said:
    It’s always bothered me that “Load Remote Images” defaulted to Yes/On when configuring new accounts in Mail, on all Apple platforms. For a company that more recently claimed to care about privacy, this seemed like a real boner of an error. Users had to remember to disable the feature and decipher which emails were at least safe, if even interesting, to load images.
    With iOS 15 that won’t seem to matter. Ahhhh… relief. Thank you, Apple.
    Publishers can perhaps partially mitigate their issues by including a “like” button, for users to express themselves and create a trackable action.
    I understand your reasons for not wanting it, but I think Apple made the correct choice over setting it up to default to offer incomplete mail content. If it was set to off I think more than likely people would assume that Mail was broken and would seek out a 3rd-party app that would not have that feature on (or at all) and also be tracking and selling your data via the app itself.

    Just as an experiment since it has been years since I've had to mess with Mail settings, I toggled the switch in settings and found that emails from local groups that are in no way nefarious were woefully incomplete with "Load remote content for messages" disabled.

    I'm glad Apple has a solid plan for increasing this aspect of privacy this year. I remember iTools's mac.com emails and then MobileMe's me.com emails would get copious amounts of spam—perhaps not as bad as Hotmail and other sites did, but they were far from what Gmail was offering users then. Today it seems like Gmail and iCloud mail push very little spam to me. I can count on one hand how many I get combined in a month. Hell, I get more random iMessage spam these days than I do email spam.
    How do you know the e-mails from local groups were not nefarious?  Many group mailings use a service.  Those services do data tracking.  If they are using a service, there is probably tracking.  Looks at the raw data of the e-mail (if you know how) - I bet you'll find it.
    I don't consider the blanket notion of tracking as being a nefarious action. Do you consider Apple nefarious? I don't, just as I don't consider mailers I've subscribe to nefarious simply because they or a service they use want analysts on who's reading their content. What I consider nefarious unsolicited spam, scams, and worse.
    You missed my point - you do not know what they (newsletter creator  and/or service) are doing.  They could be selling your information.  They could be building a profile.  And all of this without asking for your consent.
    Of course a newsletter I signed up is going to use analytics to monetize my data. Why is that is a shock to you? Why do you think the concept of making money is inherently a "nefarious" process?
    williamlondonjustmark
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