Apple's Tim Cook: EU big tech rules threaten iPhone security

Posted:
in General Discussion edited June 18
In a wide-reaching conversation, Apple CEO Tim Cook spoke harshly about the European Union's proposed rules for big tech control, and also said he is excited about the potential for augmented reality to "enhance life" beyond just iOS.

Credit: Apple
Credit: Apple


At Europe's Viva Tech conference, the Apple chief executive recently sat down for a virtual "fireside chat" with Guillaume Lacroix, CEO of digital media company Brut. During the interview, Cook covered a range of topics, including privacy, Apple's pandemic responses, and future AR endeavors.





On Apple AR, Cook said that the company has been working with the technology for a while on iPhone and iPad, and that he's generally excited about its ability to "enhance life." Cook added that, in the future, "we'll see where [AR] goes in terms of products."

Cook didn't offer much in terms of substantial information beyond stating that, at Apple, there "always has to be something up our sleeves."

The Apple chief executive also praised Europe's GDPR privacy regulations, as he has done in the past. Cook said that the regulations should be accepted as a "standard" around the globe.

However, Cook has less enthusiastic words about upcoming antitrust legislation in Europe. That includes the Digital Markets Act, which Cook said wouldn't be in the "best interest of the user." The Apple chief executive said the proposal would force Apple to allow side-loading, which he says could threaten both the privacy and security of iOS devices.

"I mean, you look at malware as an example, and Android has 47 times more malware than iOS. Why is that? It's because we've designed iOS in such a way that there's one App Store and all of the apps are reviewed prior to going on the store," Cook said.

Cook also touted some of the ways that Apple has responded to the coronavirus pandemic, including the donations of face masks and personal protective equipment, as well as the launch of the Exposure Notification framework in collaboration with Google.

The Apple executive covers other topics, including taxes and disinformation, in the full interview.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 8
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 20,225member
    EU regulators are seriously a bunch of losers. The people I run into from all over the EU are mostly somewhere else on these issues, however. 

    It’s a matter of time, with the UK at the vanguard… 
    equality72521PetrolDavewilliamlondonwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 2 of 8
    EU regulators are seriously a bunch of losers. The people I run into from all over the EU are mostly somewhere else on these issues, however. 

    It’s a matter of time, with the UK at the vanguard… 
    Let’s hope. 
    williamlondon
  • Reply 3 of 8
    crowleycrowley Posts: 8,714member
    And yet the compromises Apple makes for China... curiously silent Tim?  The EU trying to make consumer-friendly rules to break up corporate power is a threat, but Chinese app censorship, data centre sharing agreements.... nothing to see here?   As long as the money keeps flowing, everything's right as rain.

    Give me a break.
    elijahgPetrolDavemuthuk_vanalingamgatorguymariowinco
  • Reply 4 of 8
    crowley said:
    And yet the compromises Apple makes for China... curiously silent Tim?  The EU trying to make consumer-friendly rules to break up corporate power is a threat, but Chinese app censorship, data centre sharing agreements.... nothing to see here?   As long as the money keeps flowing, everything's right as rain.

    Give me a break.
    I've seen that point being thrown around a lot lately. Let's look at it from a different point:

    The People's Republic of China is anything but their first name. It is a monocratic regime that exercises so much control over the lives of its citizens, I couldn't even begin to wrap my head around that. To do business in China you have to appease the Chinese Communist Party pantheon. That is a verifiable fact. There is no way around. That is true for corporations and countries, and I've yet to see anyone of those getting down from their high horses and putting their wallet where their principled mouths are.

    On the other side we have the EU. Home to arguably the freest societies on this planet, and highest quality of living anywhere. The consumer tech market is absolutely dominated by US companies. That is due to historical factors, competence, and sometimes a bit of sleigh of hand. EU regulators are proposing protectionist measures, in a effort to boost their local tech industry, however misguided we may take their actions to be.

    Now, this argument is that Apple (and only Apple, for that matter) should be as lenient to the whims of a free society as they are to the edicts of a brutal regime. And that's because ... ? Every country and company in the world are—right now—turning a blind eye to the Chinese regime. That's because they buy a lot of our stuff, and we buy a lot of theirs.

    Now explain to me again how that makes Apple an hypocrite? Or any person, company or country buying Chinese products? Or anyone selling stuff to China? But yeah... let's thrash this or that company, for doing exactly what we all do, and support in one way or another, by action or inaction, every single day. It's called reality, you are welcome to join us anytime! It's not right, neither fair, but it IS. In the end of the day, we all need to make our money.

    It must be really cozy inside this little bubble of yours! Never needing to follow a chain of thought all the way through.
    thtwilliamlondonwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 5 of 8
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,752member
    crowley said:
    And yet the compromises Apple makes for China... curiously silent Tim?  The EU trying to make consumer-friendly rules to break up corporate power is a threat, but Chinese app censorship, data centre sharing agreements.... nothing to see here?   As long as the money keeps flowing, everything's right as rain.

    Give me a break.
    Authority issues? 

    There is a fundamental consistency in Apple’s behaviour; saving customers from sycophantic exploitation. The worlds biggest problem that nobody but Apple & China are addressing.
    edited June 17 watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 8
    Apple can integrate 3rd party App Stores so that the security model of iOS stays the same.
    The difference would just be the app review which would be done by another institution.
    And the customer could choose whom to trust.
    edited June 17 williamlondoncropr
  • Reply 7 of 8
    sirdirsirdir Posts: 133member
    So, yes, more freedom brings more risks. Should we have Apple lock us up to keep us safe? They know best, don't they? No thank you. 
    I can keep my Macs safe. I can even keep my Windows computers safe. I can also keep my iPhone safe when I'm allowed to do with it what I want to do. No need for Apple to nanny me. 
    williamlondongatorguycropr
  • Reply 8 of 8
    canukstormcanukstorm Posts: 2,532member
    EU regulators are seriously a bunch of losers. The people I run into from all over the EU are mostly somewhere else on these issues, however. 

    It’s a matter of time, with the UK at the vanguard… 
    If Tim Cook and Apple don't like the laws in the EU, they are free to stop selling their products in the EU.  The EU is not required to bend over backward for Apple.
    edited June 17 muthuk_vanalingamwilliamlondon
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