Apple's Tim Cook called Nancy Pelosi, others to warn of antitrust legislation pitfalls

Posted:
in General Discussion edited June 22
Apple CEO Tim Cook recently called U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other lawmakers in an outreach effort to sway opinion against the ratification of a set of sweeping antitrust bills that aim to rein in Big Tech, a new report claims.

Tim Cook


Citing sources familiar with Cook's calls, The New York Times reports Apple's chief executive phoned Pelosi and other members of Congress to warn them of potential pitfalls baked in to a set of five proposals announced earlier this month.

Cook cautioned that the bills were rushed, would stifle innovation, and would hurt consumers by wreaking havoc on Apple services, according to the report. He also requested that the Judiciary Committee delay its process of consideration, a funnel through which the legislation must pass before reaching the full House. With approval in the House, the bills would need to withstand Senate scrutiny before reaching the desk of the President.

Pelosi pushed back on Cook's ask, the report says, pressing him to name specific policy objections on the proposed material.

Cook is not the only tech figure to voice opposition to the batch of antitrust laws. Kent Walker, Google's senior vice president for global affairs, also made calls to lawmakers, while lobbyists and representatives for Amazon and Facebook have issued statements critical of the proposed measures.

On Monday, a group of think tanks and nonprofits, many of which receive backing from Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Google, issued a condemnatory letter to the Judiciary Committee. In it, the groups decry policies they say would result in lasting repercussions for the tech industry.

"We believe that voters want Congress to fix things that are broken -- not break or ban things that they feel are working well," the letter reads. "We strongly encourage you to reject these proposals."

The package of bipartisan bills aims to redefine how Big Tech operates and could mean a potential breakup of sector leaders. Issues targeted in the legislation include conflicts of interest, acquisitions, and outsized power enjoyed by top companies like Apple.

One bill, for example, would prohibit Apple from selling devices with first-party apps preinstalled. Another provides more funding for enforcement agencies like the Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission, the latter of which recently named prominent antitrust scholar Lina Khan as its chair.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 14
    KTRKTR Posts: 114member
    I hope these bills back fire on the government.  Then they will beg bit tech to help them correct the government incompetence.  Ant will make them a laughing stock.  Remember January 6th?

    red oakwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 14
    digitoldigitol Posts: 236member
    All we need is the right to repair law, and a “restore it as I bought it law”. (Firmware downgrades to the point the device was out of the box.)  Just about every argument against this is always admonished with fear mongering tactics. 
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 3 of 14
    rob53rob53 Posts: 2,556member
    "Pelosi pushed back on Cook's ask, the report says, pressing him to name specific policy objections on the proposed material." As I've said before, the majority of members of Congress know nothing about tech and little about how businesses actually operate. Tim should have pushed back on Pelosi and asked her whether she even understands what the bill does. Pelosi, like every member of Congress, uses aides and somewhat technical experts to give them enough information information to not sound stupid. Problem is, if you don't understand technology at all you don't really know what you're saying.
    radarthekatred oakstompywatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 14
    mac_dogmac_dog Posts: 899member
    Should have done that years ago. 
    red oakwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 14
    KuyangkohKuyangkoh Posts: 679member
    rob53 said:
    "Pelosi pushed back on Cook's ask, the report says, pressing him to name specific policy objections on the proposed material." As I've said before, the majority of members of Congress know nothing about tech and little about how businesses actually operate. Tim should have pushed back on Pelosi and asked her whether she even understands what the bill does. Pelosi, like every member of Congress, uses aides and somewhat technical experts to give them enough information information to not sound stupid. Problem is, if you don't understand technology at all you don't really know what you're saying.
    That’s what you get Apple for supporting these old guards….who knows nothing but to in rich themselves 
    JanNLred oak
  • Reply 6 of 14
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 5,653member
    Kuyangkoh said:
    rob53 said:
    "Pelosi pushed back on Cook's ask, the report says, pressing him to name specific policy objections on the proposed material." As I've said before, the majority of members of Congress know nothing about tech and little about how businesses actually operate. Tim should have pushed back on Pelosi and asked her whether she even understands what the bill does. Pelosi, like every member of Congress, uses aides and somewhat technical experts to give them enough information information to not sound stupid. Problem is, if you don't understand technology at all you don't really know what you're saying.
    That’s what you get Apple for supporting these old guards….who knows nothing but to in rich themselves 
    Last time I checked, it was "we the people" that put Pelosi and others like her in office, not Apple.  It's our fault she's there.

    That being said, I did not vote for her.  She needs to be gone.  She became irrelevant ages ago.
    bluefire1JanNLuraharared oakstompyfastbaggerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 14
    fred1fred1 Posts: 804member
    Why not just sell iPhones with only the OS and the option to immediately download all the apps when you set it up?  I always transfer everything from my old phone to the new one so I don’t care what’s on the phone when I buy it. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 14
    KTRKTR Posts: 114member
    Kuyangkoh said:
    rob53 said:
    "Pelosi pushed back on Cook's ask, the report says, pressing him to name specific policy objections on the proposed material." As I've said before, the majority of members of Congress know nothing about tech and little about how businesses actually operate. Tim should have pushed back on Pelosi and asked her whether she even understands what the bill does. Pelosi, like every member of Congress, uses aides and somewhat technical experts to give them enough information information to not sound stupid. Problem is, if you don't understand technology at all you don't really know what you're saying.
    That’s what you get Apple for supporting these old guards….who knows nothing but to in rich themselves 
    If these bit tech companies loose the fight, they will raise the price on the hardware, and or shorten the warranty policy 

  • Reply 9 of 14
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,832member
    Apple should have an App Store page listing its competitors. It should not have to remove its own apps from iPhones. I want a phone that works out of the box and not have to choose which App Store, which photo app, which video chat, which text app, which music app, and which phone dialer to use. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 14
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 1,103member
    digitol said:
    All we need is the right to repair law, and a “restore it as I bought it law”. (Firmware downgrades to the point the device was out of the box.)  Just about every argument against this is always admonished with fear mongering tactics. 
    The more sophisticated the device, the less viable "right to repair" becomes. It made perfect sense when computers were large, stationary beige boxes with boards and slots that could be swapped out with ease. Smart phones aren't that. The only way you get a secure, pocket-sized computer that can withstand water and gravity-induced impact is by designing a device that's precisely put together with glue and seals and secure components that are designed to stop working when unauthorized people tinker with them. To properly implement a right to repair protocol, it would require the manufacturer to create the kind of rigid repair technician training certifications that shade-tree mechanics don't want to deal with. Devices that are easy to take apart and reassemble would actually be more prone to breakage. If anyone with a screwdriver can swap out the secure enclave or fingerprint reader, then the devices are no longer secure. Is that fear mongering? I don't think so. 

    As for the "resort it as I bought it" concept, how many consumers would do that without also maintaining the incongruous expectation that the device will still be supported by the manufacturer and somehow remain secure without all the now-uninstalled security updates? 
    stompyfastasleepFileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 14
    seankillseankill Posts: 544member
    I love how these liberal companies complain when the government does liberal things. 
    fastbagger
  • Reply 12 of 14
    k2kwk2kw Posts: 2,035member
    sflocal said:
    Kuyangkoh said:
    rob53 said:
    "Pelosi pushed back on Cook's ask, the report says, pressing him to name specific policy objections on the proposed material." As I've said before, the majority of members of Congress know nothing about tech and little about how businesses actually operate. Tim should have pushed back on Pelosi and asked her whether she even understands what the bill does. Pelosi, like every member of Congress, uses aides and somewhat technical experts to give them enough information information to not sound stupid. Problem is, if you don't understand technology at all you don't really know what you're saying.
    That’s what you get Apple for supporting these old guards….who knows nothing but to in rich themselves 
    Last time I checked, it was "we the people" that put Pelosi and others like her in office, not Apple.  It's our fault she's there.

    That being said, I did not vote for her.  She needs to be gone.  She became irrelevant ages ago.
    She’s proven herself the most powerful
    woman in America EVER.  And probably the second most powerful women in the World after Margaret Thatcher.
    fastasleep
  • Reply 13 of 14
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 5,477member
    sflocal said:
    Kuyangkoh said:
    rob53 said:
    "Pelosi pushed back on Cook's ask, the report says, pressing him to name specific policy objections on the proposed material." As I've said before, the majority of members of Congress know nothing about tech and little about how businesses actually operate. Tim should have pushed back on Pelosi and asked her whether she even understands what the bill does. Pelosi, like every member of Congress, uses aides and somewhat technical experts to give them enough information information to not sound stupid. Problem is, if you don't understand technology at all you don't really know what you're saying.
    That’s what you get Apple for supporting these old guards….who knows nothing but to in rich themselves 
    Last time I checked, it was "we the people" that put Pelosi and others like her in office, not Apple.  It's our fault she's there.

    That being said, I did not vote for her.  She needs to be gone.  She became irrelevant ages ago.
    Lolololol yea, the most powerful woman in US history is irrelevant and needs to go, says some dude on the Internet. Noted! 
  • Reply 14 of 14
    rob53 said:
    "Pelosi pushed back on Cook's ask, the report says, pressing him to name specific policy objections on the proposed material." As I've said before, the majority of members of Congress know nothing about tech and little about how businesses actually operate. Tim should have pushed back on Pelosi and asked her whether she even understands what the bill does. Pelosi, like every member of Congress, uses aides and somewhat technical experts to give them enough information information to not sound stupid. Problem is, if you don't understand technology at all you don't really know what you're saying.
    Tim Cook, like many other CEOs, uses aides and legal experts to make arguments without sounding stupid. Pelosi is the expert at getting legislation through the House and Senate; perhaps she was simply asking Mr Cook if he had any specific complaints that she could then use to build a comprehensive argument?
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