Woman claims Apple Store lost her MacBook, later found

Posted:
in General Discussion
A California woman says Apple Vintage Faire, Modesto, lost her MacBook, reminding users it's critical to back up their passwords.




Corina Fezi, a resident of Modesto, California, dropped off her MacBook at her local Apple Store to get its screen repaired. The date for her pick-up was June 23.

However, Fezi told CBS Sacramento that day came and went. According to her, Apple had lost her computer.

"I've been calling Apple support ever since and nobody has a tracking number, nobody knows where my computer is, nobody has any information for me," Fezi said.

She claimed that her job was on the line because the computer contained passwords that she failed to back up before taking it in for repair.

CBS Sacramento reached out to Apple, who responded that Feliz had received her computer "yesterday."

"Thanks for following up," Apple told the news station. "We've reached out to the customer and have achieved a mutual resolution. Corina picked up her computer as of yesterday."

Cases like this serve as a reminder to responsibly back up passwords whenever possible. Fortunately, Apple's iCloud Keychain syncs passwords with all devices on the same Apple ID.

It is also important to make sure whatever password manager you're using is securely storing your passwords. For example, it was recently discovered that thieves in Brazil were able to gain access to victims accounts by merely searching for passwords stored in unsecured locations, such as the Notes apps.

Keep up with everything Apple in the weekly AppleInsider Podcast -- and get a fast news update from AppleInsider Daily. Just say, "Hey, Siri," to your HomePod mini and ask for these podcasts, and our latest HomeKit Insider episode too.If you want an ad-free main AppleInsider Podcast experience, you can support the AppleInsider podcast by subscribing for $5 per month through Apple's Podcasts app, or via Patreon if you prefer any other podcast player.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 23
    XedXed Posts: 1,030member
    It amazes me how poor people are with managing the most sensitive aspects of their lives and then blame others for their lack of planning and basic safety.

    I can wipe any device right now and give it to anyone to repair without losing any important data. This is by design. Even if giving to Apple (whom I trust) for a screen repair I will wipe my device—if possible—because Apple is run by humans (whom I don't trust).
    lkruppMplsPpulseimageswatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 23
    neilmneilm Posts: 903member
    I’ve had lots of our office Apple laptops repaired over the years (often for new batteries). Apple always cautions to protect confidential data and to back up the drive first.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 23
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,477member
    Xed said:
    It amazes me how poor people are with managing the most sensitive aspects of their lives and then blame others for their lack of planning and basic safety.

    I can wipe any device right now and give it to anyone to repair without losing any important data. This is by design. Even if giving to Apple (whom I trust) for a screen repair I will wipe my device—if possible—because Apple is run by humans (whom I don't trust).
    Because the culture has been teaching people for decades now that nothing is their fault, that they are not required to take personal responsibility for anything, someone else is always the cause of their problems, that their victim status is the key to success and prosperity, and the world owes them a living. Participation trophies are the goal, not academic performance. So why does something like this woman’s plight surprise anyone?
    edited July 8 j2fusionwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 23
    alphafoxalphafox Posts: 131member
    TLDR; Apple finds laptop and returns it to lady. The end. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 23
    crowleycrowley Posts: 8,765member
    lkrupp said:
    Xed said:
    It amazes me how poor people are with managing the most sensitive aspects of their lives and then blame others for their lack of planning and basic safety.

    I can wipe any device right now and give it to anyone to repair without losing any important data. This is by design. Even if giving to Apple (whom I trust) for a screen repair I will wipe my device—if possible—because Apple is run by humans (whom I don't trust).
    Because the culture has been teaching people for decades now that nothing is their fault, that they are not required to take personal responsibility for anything, someone else is always the cause of their problems, that their victim status is the key to success and prosperity, and the world owes them a living. Participation trophies are the goal, not academic performance. So why does something like this woman’s plight surprise anyone?
    This woman shouldn’t blame Apple for losing her computer?  That’s all I’m seeing her doing. 
    The password angle added additional stress to her, but she wasn’t blaming Apple for that situation.

    And “the culture”, i.e. the linked TV show spot literally told people that they should use iCloud Keychain to better secure and backup their passwords.

    In any case Apple appears to have sorted it out, so no real harm and everyone learns a lesson. Everyone except for those that just want to grumble and grouch about the youth of today from their aged throne of perfection.
    MplsPAppleZuluronnmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 6 of 23
    crowley said:

    This woman shouldn’t blame Apple for losing her computer?  That’s all I’m seeing her doing. 
    The password angle added additional stress to her, but she wasn’t blaming Apple for that situation.

    And “the culture”, i.e. the linked TV show spot literally told people that they should use iCloud Keychain to better secure and backup their passwords.

    In any case Apple appears to have sorted it out, so no real harm and everyone learns a lesson. Everyone except for those that just want to grumble and grouch about the youth of today from their aged throne of perfection.
    Because the story has to be spinned away from the central point that Apple was sloppy and could not even provide a tracking number much less the computer itself until she escalated the issue. Instead it needs to be reinterpreted to suit someone else’s world view.
    ronn
  • Reply 7 of 23
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,274member
    crowley said:
    lkrupp said:
    Xed said:
    It amazes me how poor people are with managing the most sensitive aspects of their lives and then blame others for their lack of planning and basic safety.

    I can wipe any device right now and give it to anyone to repair without losing any important data. This is by design. Even if giving to Apple (whom I trust) for a screen repair I will wipe my device—if possible—because Apple is run by humans (whom I don't trust).
    Because the culture has been teaching people for decades now that nothing is their fault, that they are not required to take personal responsibility for anything, someone else is always the cause of their problems, that their victim status is the key to success and prosperity, and the world owes them a living. Participation trophies are the goal, not academic performance. So why does something like this woman’s plight surprise anyone?
    This woman shouldn’t blame Apple for losing her computer?  That’s all I’m seeing her doing. 
    The password angle added additional stress to her, but she wasn’t blaming Apple for that situation.

    And “the culture”, i.e. the linked TV show spot literally told people that they should use iCloud Keychain to better secure and backup their passwords.

    In any case Apple appears to have sorted it out, so no real harm and everyone learns a lesson. Everyone except for those that just want to grumble and grouch about the youth of today from their aged throne of perfection.
    It still amazes me how many people don’t backup anything, especially when there are so many easy options for doing so. I haven’t taken a computer in to Apple in years, but part of the standard disclaimer when you give them your computer is that you should backup your data prior to doing so.

    If this was just a screen repair, the woman should have been able to attach an external monitor to allow her to backup the data. If it was non-bootable then there would have been no guarantee that Apple would have been able to save her data anyway.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 23
    XedXed Posts: 1,030member
    crowley said:
    lkrupp said:
    Xed said:
    It amazes me how poor people are with managing the most sensitive aspects of their lives and then blame others for their lack of planning and basic safety.

    I can wipe any device right now and give it to anyone to repair without losing any important data. This is by design. Even if giving to Apple (whom I trust) for a screen repair I will wipe my device—if possible—because Apple is run by humans (whom I don't trust).
    Because the culture has been teaching people for decades now that nothing is their fault, that they are not required to take personal responsibility for anything, someone else is always the cause of their problems, that their victim status is the key to success and prosperity, and the world owes them a living. Participation trophies are the goal, not academic performance. So why does something like this woman’s plight surprise anyone?
    This woman shouldn’t blame Apple for losing her computer?  That’s all I’m seeing her doing. 
    The password angle added additional stress to her, but she wasn’t blaming Apple for that situation.

    And “the culture”, i.e. the linked TV show spot literally told people that they should use iCloud Keychain to better secure and backup their passwords.

    In any case Apple appears to have sorted it out, so no real harm and everyone learns a lesson. Everyone except for those that just want to grumble and grouch about the youth of today from their aged throne of perfection.
    I would agree with your assessment until AI added the comment that "she claimed that her job was on the line because the computer contained passwords," which is her responsibly to keep track of regardless of what happens to her computer. If her SSD was forever gone (e.g: house fire, theft) she needs to have a solution in place where her job isn't being threatened because her Mac is gone. Can you imagine having a job where losing something would cause you to get fired and not taking the time to protect your occupation when it's as simple as jotting down something that takes only a moment? I can't, but maybe I'm odd since I plan ahead, like driving to the location before the interview or first day to make sure I know where to be so it reduces the likelihood of being late.

    Additionally, those two examples are at least things you have less control over predicting, but when you actively take it into an Apple Store you have time to plan for such things, like backing up or writing down important information. I assume her display was cracked, but even if the built-in display was completely non-functional it's very likely that hooked one up to her Mac would still be possible.

    Unexpected shit happens all the time in life, but if you're responsible and proactive the problems don't have to be cascading.
    edited July 8 watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 23
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 1,205member
    lkrupp said:
    Xed said:
    It amazes me how poor people are with managing the most sensitive aspects of their lives and then blame others for their lack of planning and basic safety.

    I can wipe any device right now and give it to anyone to repair without losing any important data. This is by design. Even if giving to Apple (whom I trust) for a screen repair I will wipe my device—if possible—because Apple is run by humans (whom I don't trust).
    Because the culture has been teaching people for decades now that nothing is their fault, that they are not required to take personal responsibility for anything, someone else is always the cause of their problems, that their victim status is the key to success and prosperity, and the world owes them a living. Participation trophies are the goal, not academic performance. So why does something like this woman’s plight surprise anyone?
    Get off my lawn!
    Dogpersonmacguiwatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 23
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 1,205member
    crowley said:
    lkrupp said:
    Xed said:
    It amazes me how poor people are with managing the most sensitive aspects of their lives and then blame others for their lack of planning and basic safety.

    I can wipe any device right now and give it to anyone to repair without losing any important data. This is by design. Even if giving to Apple (whom I trust) for a screen repair I will wipe my device—if possible—because Apple is run by humans (whom I don't trust).
    Because the culture has been teaching people for decades now that nothing is their fault, that they are not required to take personal responsibility for anything, someone else is always the cause of their problems, that their victim status is the key to success and prosperity, and the world owes them a living. Participation trophies are the goal, not academic performance. So why does something like this woman’s plight surprise anyone?
    This woman shouldn’t blame Apple for losing her computer?  That’s all I’m seeing her doing. 
    The password angle added additional stress to her, but she wasn’t blaming Apple for that situation.

    And “the culture”, i.e. the linked TV show spot literally told people that they should use iCloud Keychain to better secure and backup their passwords.

    In any case Apple appears to have sorted it out, so no real harm and everyone learns a lesson. Everyone except for those that just want to grumble and grouch about the youth of today from their aged throne of perfection.
    Seriously, there are two mistakes detailed in the original story. The lady failed to back up and secure important information, and Apple lost her computer. Hopefully the lady learned her lesson about backing things up and the Apple Store staff reviewed their processes, plugged the hole and supplemented staff training. With the computer found, repaired and returned, all concerned have the opportunity to use this as a lesson learned.
    Dogpersonmuthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 23
    klink172klink172 Posts: 14member
    Why is this even a story?
    mike1Dogpersonmacpluspluswatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 23
    crowleycrowley Posts: 8,765member
    Xed said:
    crowley said:
    lkrupp said:
    Xed said:
    It amazes me how poor people are with managing the most sensitive aspects of their lives and then blame others for their lack of planning and basic safety.

    I can wipe any device right now and give it to anyone to repair without losing any important data. This is by design. Even if giving to Apple (whom I trust) for a screen repair I will wipe my device—if possible—because Apple is run by humans (whom I don't trust).
    Because the culture has been teaching people for decades now that nothing is their fault, that they are not required to take personal responsibility for anything, someone else is always the cause of their problems, that their victim status is the key to success and prosperity, and the world owes them a living. Participation trophies are the goal, not academic performance. So why does something like this woman’s plight surprise anyone?
    This woman shouldn’t blame Apple for losing her computer?  That’s all I’m seeing her doing. 
    The password angle added additional stress to her, but she wasn’t blaming Apple for that situation.

    And “the culture”, i.e. the linked TV show spot literally told people that they should use iCloud Keychain to better secure and backup their passwords.

    In any case Apple appears to have sorted it out, so no real harm and everyone learns a lesson. Everyone except for those that just want to grumble and grouch about the youth of today from their aged throne of perfection.
    I would agree with your assessment until AI added the comment that "she claimed that her job was on the line because the computer contained passwords," which is her responsibly to keep track of regardless of what happens to her computer. If her SSD was forever gone (e.g: house fire, theft) she needs to have a solution in place where her job isn't being threatened because her Mac is gone. Can you imagine having a job where losing something would cause you to get fired and not taking the time to protect your occupation when it's as simple as jotting down something that takes only a moment? I can't, but maybe I'm odd since I plan ahead, like driving to the location before the interview or first day to make sure I know where to be so it reduces the likelihood of being late.

    Additionally, those two examples are at least things you have less control over predicting, but when you actively take it into an Apple Store you have time to plan for such things, like backing up or writing down important information. I assume her display was cracked, but even if the built-in display was completely non-functional it's very likely that hooked one up to her Mac would still be possible.
    I've only taken in a computer to Apple for repair once, an iMac about 10 years ago, but I'm 90% sure I remember the Genius Bar guy asking me if I'd backed up everything when I dropped it off.  I wonder if they still do that, and if there's any warning if the answer is no.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 23
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 1,205member
    crowley said:
    Xed said:
    crowley said:
    lkrupp said:
    Xed said:
    It amazes me how poor people are with managing the most sensitive aspects of their lives and then blame others for their lack of planning and basic safety.

    I can wipe any device right now and give it to anyone to repair without losing any important data. This is by design. Even if giving to Apple (whom I trust) for a screen repair I will wipe my device—if possible—because Apple is run by humans (whom I don't trust).
    Because the culture has been teaching people for decades now that nothing is their fault, that they are not required to take personal responsibility for anything, someone else is always the cause of their problems, that their victim status is the key to success and prosperity, and the world owes them a living. Participation trophies are the goal, not academic performance. So why does something like this woman’s plight surprise anyone?
    This woman shouldn’t blame Apple for losing her computer?  That’s all I’m seeing her doing. 
    The password angle added additional stress to her, but she wasn’t blaming Apple for that situation.

    And “the culture”, i.e. the linked TV show spot literally told people that they should use iCloud Keychain to better secure and backup their passwords.

    In any case Apple appears to have sorted it out, so no real harm and everyone learns a lesson. Everyone except for those that just want to grumble and grouch about the youth of today from their aged throne of perfection.
    I would agree with your assessment until AI added the comment that "she claimed that her job was on the line because the computer contained passwords," which is her responsibly to keep track of regardless of what happens to her computer. If her SSD was forever gone (e.g: house fire, theft) she needs to have a solution in place where her job isn't being threatened because her Mac is gone. Can you imagine having a job where losing something would cause you to get fired and not taking the time to protect your occupation when it's as simple as jotting down something that takes only a moment? I can't, but maybe I'm odd since I plan ahead, like driving to the location before the interview or first day to make sure I know where to be so it reduces the likelihood of being late.

    Additionally, those two examples are at least things you have less control over predicting, but when you actively take it into an Apple Store you have time to plan for such things, like backing up or writing down important information. I assume her display was cracked, but even if the built-in display was completely non-functional it's very likely that hooked one up to her Mac would still be possible.
    I've only taken in a computer to Apple for repair once, an iMac about 10 years ago, but I'm 90% sure I remember the Genius Bar guy asking me if I'd backed up everything when I dropped it off.  I wonder if they still do that, and if there's any warning if the answer is no.
    Yes.

    Get you Mac ready for service

    Get your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch ready for service

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 23
    mfrydmfryd Posts: 133member
    alphafox said:
    TLDR; Apple finds laptop and returns it to lady. The end. 
    It is not clear that Apple found and returned her computer. Apple merely says that they had a solution that made the customer happy, and the customer now has her computer. It does not say that this is the same computer she dropped off, only that she picked up a computer that is now hers. It would be consistent with this statement if Apple had given the customer a replacement computer. It would also be consistent if Apple had given the customer a better model in exchange for a non-disclosure agreement.
  • Reply 15 of 23
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,477member
    AppleZulu said:
    lkrupp said:
    Xed said:
    It amazes me how poor people are with managing the most sensitive aspects of their lives and then blame others for their lack of planning and basic safety.

    I can wipe any device right now and give it to anyone to repair without losing any important data. This is by design. Even if giving to Apple (whom I trust) for a screen repair I will wipe my device—if possible—because Apple is run by humans (whom I don't trust).
    Because the culture has been teaching people for decades now that nothing is their fault, that they are not required to take personal responsibility for anything, someone else is always the cause of their problems, that their victim status is the key to success and prosperity, and the world owes them a living. Participation trophies are the goal, not academic performance. So why does something like this woman’s plight surprise anyone?
    Get off my lawn!
    Because if you injure yourself while on my lawn you will hire an injury lawyer and sue me, that’s why. See my earlier rant as you perfectly make my point.
  • Reply 16 of 23
    XedXed Posts: 1,030member
    crowley said:
    Xed said:
    crowley said:
    lkrupp said:
    Xed said:
    It amazes me how poor people are with managing the most sensitive aspects of their lives and then blame others for their lack of planning and basic safety.

    I can wipe any device right now and give it to anyone to repair without losing any important data. This is by design. Even if giving to Apple (whom I trust) for a screen repair I will wipe my device—if possible—because Apple is run by humans (whom I don't trust).
    Because the culture has been teaching people for decades now that nothing is their fault, that they are not required to take personal responsibility for anything, someone else is always the cause of their problems, that their victim status is the key to success and prosperity, and the world owes them a living. Participation trophies are the goal, not academic performance. So why does something like this woman’s plight surprise anyone?
    This woman shouldn’t blame Apple for losing her computer?  That’s all I’m seeing her doing. 
    The password angle added additional stress to her, but she wasn’t blaming Apple for that situation.

    And “the culture”, i.e. the linked TV show spot literally told people that they should use iCloud Keychain to better secure and backup their passwords.

    In any case Apple appears to have sorted it out, so no real harm and everyone learns a lesson. Everyone except for those that just want to grumble and grouch about the youth of today from their aged throne of perfection.
    I would agree with your assessment until AI added the comment that "she claimed that her job was on the line because the computer contained passwords," which is her responsibly to keep track of regardless of what happens to her computer. If her SSD was forever gone (e.g: house fire, theft) she needs to have a solution in place where her job isn't being threatened because her Mac is gone. Can you imagine having a job where losing something would cause you to get fired and not taking the time to protect your occupation when it's as simple as jotting down something that takes only a moment? I can't, but maybe I'm odd since I plan ahead, like driving to the location before the interview or first day to make sure I know where to be so it reduces the likelihood of being late.

    Additionally, those two examples are at least things you have less control over predicting, but when you actively take it into an Apple Store you have time to plan for such things, like backing up or writing down important information. I assume her display was cracked, but even if the built-in display was completely non-functional it's very likely that hooked one up to her Mac would still be possible.
    I've only taken in a computer to Apple for repair once, an iMac about 10 years ago, but I'm 90% sure I remember the Genius Bar guy asking me if I'd backed up everything when I dropped it off.  I wonder if they still do that, and if there's any warning if the answer is no.
    They still ask that. I've even heard that with an in-house iPhone screen repair that would take a couple hours.

    I'm not sure if the Geniuses can really warn users. All they can do is suggest that the customer backs up their data.

    I personally think customers should delete their devices before handing them over to anyone for a repair, including Apple, but most would probably think that's too inconvenient. In the story below I wouldn't blame the woman for not deleting her device, but I would blame her if she didn't have a PIN on her device.

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 23
    ronnronn Posts: 449member
    We've had occasion to visit Apple stores for repairs/fixes twice within the past year. Both times we were advised beforehand and once in store to have backups of data for our protection. The first instance a fellow customer waved off this advice and said "Just fix my sh--!" I fault the woman for not backing up her data and possibly losing her job as a result. But Apple is also at fault because what if that was the only machine she had available? What if her iPhone wasn't enough to perform her job even if she had her data backed up? Our initial interaction with Apple was frustrating as a process that "should take an hour or so" turned into more than three. But we had backup machines and we were not under a deadline. There's no excuse for losing a laptop and giving a customer the run-around. I suspect they fixed her data "problem" and gave her a replacement MacBook once she loudly complained and CBS Sacramento got involved.
  • Reply 18 of 23
    No one has considered the problem with security of data if computer was lost in the system with intact data on the drive. The company IT department would not have a leg to stand on if they had approved the repair. Therefore it sounds like it was a bring your own device or a company computer that she broke and repaired on her own bat. To be fair the “job-on-line” statement could have been a plaintive wail, rather than a complaint against Apple. We just don’t have the data — pun intended 
    stompywatto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 23
    mike1mike1 Posts: 2,755member
    mfryd said:
    alphafox said:
    TLDR; Apple finds laptop and returns it to lady. The end. 
    It is not clear that Apple found and returned her computer. Apple merely says that they had a solution that made the customer happy, and the customer now has her computer. It does not say that this is the same computer she dropped off, only that she picked up a computer that is now hers. It would be consistent with this statement if Apple had given the customer a replacement computer. It would also be consistent if Apple had given the customer a better model in exchange for a non-disclosure agreement.

    Which is exactly why the ask if you have backed up your data. There is a possibility that they will replace your gear rather than repairing it.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 23
    sbdudesbdude Posts: 83member
    Great story, Hansel.
    watto_cobra
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