First cannabis delivery app lands on App Store following policy changes

Posted:
in iOS
The first app to offer cannabis delivery has launched in the App Store, a month after Apple changed App Store policies allowing apps that handled sales via legal dispensaries.




Apple made a change to the App Store policies on June 7, introducing many changes to rules about what apps offered for download can do. Among the changes was a loosening of restrictions on in-app sales from licensed and legal pharmacies and cannabis dispensaries in areas where they are allowed, and it has taken just over a month for the first app to arrive that takes advantage of that alteration.

Eaze is the first app available on the App Store that can facilitate the purchase and delivery of cannabis in the United States. While Eaze has offered sales via its website, the new app is thought to be more convenient, as those same transactions can be performed without directing users to a browser.

The app includes registration, ID verification, handles payments, and receipts for orders, as well as on-demand delivery and order tracking. Sales are limited to those aged 21 years or over, and with multiple verifications of customer IDs throughout the purchase and delivery process.

To keep the service legal, the app geofences purchases to jurisdictions where cannabis is legal. Currently, the service delivers across California, and will start delivery in Michigan later in July.

"Eaze has always been about using the latest developments in technology to make shopping for legal cannabis more accessible," said Eaze CEO Rogelio Choy. "It's hard to overstate how important this is to our company and the industry."

While Apple has been progressive in allowing cannabis sales apps in the App Store, Google's Play Store policy outright bans apps that allow the sale of marijuana or related products, "regardless of legality."

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 16
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,698member
    I wonder if the geofence works on  billing address as well as delivery.
  • Reply 2 of 16
    mfrydmfryd Posts: 125member
    I wonder how the App handles payments? Most banks are federally chartered, and are not allowed to knowingly service customers running an illegal business.   Under Federal law, pot is illegal everywhere in the USA.  Therefore banks can’t take on pot sellers as customers.  This is why many pot businesses are cash only.  It’s true that the Feds tend not to enforce the pot laws in state that allow pot, but that is not the same as it being legal.
    lkrupp
  • Reply 3 of 16
    glennhglennh Posts: 43member
    mfryd said:
    I wonder how the App handles payments? Most banks are federally chartered, and are not allowed to knowingly service customers running an illegal business.   Under Federal law, pot is illegal everywhere in the USA.  Therefore banks can’t take on pot sellers as customers.  This is why many pot businesses are cash only.  It’s true that the Feds tend not to enforce the pot laws in state that allow pot, but that is not the same as it being legal.”


    Glennh says:

    In addition, it is illegal in most states that allow medical or personal use of Mary Jane for a second party to facilitate or transport MJ  to others.

    I am surprise this passed muster with Apple Legal which is usually very conservative in obeying all laws regardless of jurisdiction. 

    I think these pot apps will get booted as soon as some minors gets caught using the apps along with the resulting negative publicity or when  a conservative U. S. Attorney says something regarding the apps and the fact that federal seizure laws still allows the seizure of anything used in violation of any Federal Drug Law. 

    Either way, get ready for the show because nothing goes unnoticed and everything is game for political theater these days, especially a left coast tech company. allowing  others to circumvent a U.S. Law. 
    edited July 12 muthuk_vanalingamlkrupp
  • Reply 4 of 16
    mfryd said:
    I wonder how the App handles payments? Most banks are federally chartered, and are not allowed to knowingly service customers running an illegal business.   Under Federal law, pot is illegal everywhere in the USA.  Therefore banks can’t take on pot sellers as customers.  This is why many pot businesses are cash only.  It’s true that the Feds tend not to enforce the pot laws in state that allow pot, but that is not the same as it being legal.
    This was more of an issue prior to the Cole memo. Now there are over 700 banks that will work with cannabis sellers so taking credit/debit cards is pretty common. 
  • Reply 5 of 16
    mfryd said:
    I wonder how the App handles payments? Most banks are federally chartered, and are not allowed to knowingly service customers running an illegal business.   Under Federal law, pot is illegal everywhere in the USA.  Therefore banks can’t take on pot sellers as customers.  This is why many pot businesses are cash only.  It’s true that the Feds tend not to enforce the pot laws in state that allow pot, but that is not the same as it being legal.
    This was more of an issue prior to the Cole memo. Now there are over 700 banks that will work with cannabis sellers so taking credit/debit cards is pretty common. 
    The Cole Memorandum was rescinded by A.G. Sessions, but an analysis of DOJ cases since then suggests that they're still following the guidance from Cole.  The fact that it was rescinded means, however, that the feds could go back to being stupid about it at any time.
    tenthousandthings
  • Reply 6 of 16
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,304member
    Sad to see the culture descending into an alcohol and drug addled state.
    fahlmantokyojimucolumbia
  • Reply 7 of 16
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,395member
    lkrupp said:
    Sad to see the culture descending into an alcohol and drug addled state.
    Alcohol and drugs are fine and quite enjoyable when done so responsibly. Not sure if you’re referring to California or “state” in general, but when it comes to addiction, CA isn’t near the top of the list of drug use or mortality states. 

    California is only ranked 34 for OD deaths. Worst ranked states are the rust belt:

    https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/deaths/2019.html

    California is only ranked 31 for use:

    https://wallethub.com/edu/drug-use-by-state/35150

    ….And this is a pot app. Cannabis doesn’t OD users, unlike even alcohol, which is legal in all 50.  Opioids are the real killer, ushered in by the pushing and over prescription by the pharmaceutical companies. Some great documentaries about it. 

    https://tv.apple.com/us/show/the-crime-of-the-century/umc.cmc.3xo7o3f19v65u2org4ncsyui1
    edited July 12 Oferroundaboutnow
  • Reply 8 of 16
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 9,869member
    A pusher will deliver it to your front door for (likely) far less money -- and no bothersome sales tax, age restrictions or questions.

    But this will probably go the same way as the numbers racket that had always been illegal -- till the state got into the business:  to buy a number you just walked over to your local numbers guy -- who was both more convenient and paid better -- and there were never any fixing scandals from the mob: if you ruined their business you didn't go to jail, you got your knees broken (or worse).   But, eventually, the state took over the business anyway.

    So, at this point (at least in PA) the state runs the numbers racket as well as selling wine and hard liquor (all of which were, at some point, illegal).
    How long will it be till they're selling pot too?
    ...  Or, will Amazon take it over?    They could deliver your pot along with your latest electronic gadget and blood pressure meds.
  • Reply 9 of 16
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 9,869member
    mfryd said:
    I wonder how the App handles payments? Most banks are federally chartered, and are not allowed to knowingly service customers running an illegal business.   Under Federal law, pot is illegal everywhere in the USA.  Therefore banks can’t take on pot sellers as customers.  This is why many pot businesses are cash only.  It’s true that the Feds tend not to enforce the pot laws in state that allow pot, but that is not the same as it being legal.

    It says:
    "Pay with your debit card, bank account or cash"
  • Reply 10 of 16
    lkrupp said:
    Sad to see the culture descending into an alcohol and drug addled state.
    (Comment deleted by Better Judgment, Inc. “Your Better Judgment People!” It was good, though. Really funny. Predictable, maybe, but still pretty damn funny. It’s a shame, really, that it’s been deleted because you’d have probably laughed out loud and spit coffee (or whatever you might be drinking at the time) when you read it, but there’s always that one friend who could be offended, and they’d be, like, “There he goes again. A--hole being an a--hole.” So it’s probably just as well that cooler heads have prevailed at this point.)
    edited July 12 Ofer
  • Reply 11 of 16
    BeatsBeats Posts: 2,441member
    My cousin had this idea a long time ago. Really sucks being broke and not be able to bring your thoughts to life.

    Sometimes we just hang out and exchange ideas. We really need to get our lives together.
    edited July 12 Ofer
  • Reply 12 of 16
    libertyforalllibertyforall Posts: 1,375member

    Wonder why it does not support the state of Illinois?  

  • Reply 13 of 16
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,304member
    A pusher will deliver it to your front door for (likely) far less money -- and no bothersome sales tax, age restrictions or questions.

    But this will probably go the same way as the numbers racket that had always been illegal -- till the state got into the business:  to buy a number you just walked over to your local numbers guy -- who was both more convenient and paid better -- and there were never any fixing scandals from the mob: if you ruined their business you didn't go to jail, you got your knees broken (or worse).   But, eventually, the state took over the business anyway.

    So, at this point (at least in PA) the state runs the numbers racket as well as selling wine and hard liquor (all of which were, at some point, illegal).
    How long will it be till they're selling pot too?
    ...  Or, will Amazon take it over?    They could deliver your pot along with your latest electronic gadget and blood pressure meds.
    There’s one more vice that the government is looking into...prostitution. Like you say, they’ve got gambling, liquor, drugs, tobacco, so why not the oldest profession too? Tax sex! Profiting from misery is something the government does well.
    edited July 13
  • Reply 14 of 16
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,304member

    Wonder why it does not support the state of Illinois?  

    It should. Illinois has legalized recreational use.
     
    I’ve got TWO cannabis dispensaries within five miles of my little abode in Southern Illinois. I always shake my head watching the pot heads lined up with their little brown paper bags down the street. There’s no parking near the pot store so they have to walk about half a mile because the nearby local businesses will not allow them to use their parking lots. So there they are, lined up and walking to get their pot like ants heading back to the anthill. 

    On the other hand, my town of about 20,000 got over $2 million in pot taxes last year. So there’s that.
    edited July 13
  • Reply 15 of 16
    crowleycrowley Posts: 8,252member
    lkrupp said:
    A pusher will deliver it to your front door for (likely) far less money -- and no bothersome sales tax, age restrictions or questions.

    But this will probably go the same way as the numbers racket that had always been illegal -- till the state got into the business:  to buy a number you just walked over to your local numbers guy -- who was both more convenient and paid better -- and there were never any fixing scandals from the mob: if you ruined their business you didn't go to jail, you got your knees broken (or worse).   But, eventually, the state took over the business anyway.

    So, at this point (at least in PA) the state runs the numbers racket as well as selling wine and hard liquor (all of which were, at some point, illegal).
    How long will it be till they're selling pot too?
    ...  Or, will Amazon take it over?    They could deliver your pot along with your latest electronic gadget and blood pressure meds.
    There’s one more vice that the government is looking into...prostitution. Like you say, they’ve got gambling, liquor, drugs, tobacco, so why not the oldest profession too? Tax sex! Profiting from misery is something the government does well.
    Newsflash: Things are less attractive if they cost more.  And taxes can fund support services.

  • Reply 16 of 16
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 9,869member
    lkrupp said:
    A pusher will deliver it to your front door for (likely) far less money -- and no bothersome sales tax, age restrictions or questions.

    But this will probably go the same way as the numbers racket that had always been illegal -- till the state got into the business:  to buy a number you just walked over to your local numbers guy -- who was both more convenient and paid better -- and there were never any fixing scandals from the mob: if you ruined their business you didn't go to jail, you got your knees broken (or worse).   But, eventually, the state took over the business anyway.

    So, at this point (at least in PA) the state runs the numbers racket as well as selling wine and hard liquor (all of which were, at some point, illegal).
    How long will it be till they're selling pot too?
    ...  Or, will Amazon take it over?    They could deliver your pot along with your latest electronic gadget and blood pressure meds.
    There’s one more vice that the government is looking into...prostitution. Like you say, they’ve got gambling, liquor, drugs, tobacco, so why not the oldest profession too? Tax sex! Profiting from misery is something the government does well.
    Legalize and tax sex workers?
    That would be the Libertarian thing to do.  Very capitalist.  But, despite the fact that they create the least societal harm of all the vices you list (gambling, drugs, alchohol & tobacco), it will likely never be legalized because we got religion (despite the fact that the leader of our dominant religion hung around with sex workers and the like).  

    I guess they need something to oppose.  Otherwise they aren't opposed to anything.  And isn't that the purpose of modern day religion?
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