Apple TV+ review: Apple gets musical with often-delightful 'Schmigadoon!'

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The new Apple TV+ miniseries stars Keegan-Michael Key, Cecily Strong, and a cavalcade of Broadway veterans. While entertaining, it will likely appeal to the theater crowd only.

Episode 2. Cecily Strong and Keegan-Michael Key in
Episode 2. Cecily Strong and Keegan-Michael Key in "Schmigadoon!" premiering July 16, 2021 on Apple TV+


With many of its original shows, Apple TV+ is going for mass appeal. That's part of what got it 34 Emmy nominations, 20 of which were for Ted Lasso.

Its latest new show, Schmigadoon!, is not that. It's very targeted entertainment, geared towards those who know and love Broadway and movie musicals, specifically the ones of the mid-20th century. If you're somebody who does, you're going to find a lot to love in Schmigadoon! If you're not, you may well find yourself totally lost.

To a mythical town

Ensemble cast in
Ensemble cast in "Schmigadoon!" premiering July 16, 2021 on Apple TV+.


Schmigadoon! is a six-part limited series, in which each episode is about 30 minutes; the first two episodes debut July 16, with one a week to follow. I've seen all six episodes. I enjoyed it, but it's one of those shows where you're either going to be on its specific wavelength, or you're not.

The series, created by Cinco Paul and Ken Daurio, is an elaborate homage to the work of Rodgers and Hammerstein, Lerner and Loewe, and Meredith Wilson. Essentially, it's the type of musical fare that dominated Broadway before Stephen Sondheim came along. Individual songs ape specific numbers from Oklahoma, The Music Man, and other musicals. The numbers thread the tricky needle of paying homage to decades-old entertainment, while occasionally mocking it for retrograde sentiments of the past.

Keegan-Michael Key and Cecily Strong star as Josh and Melissa, a couple from modern-day New York City. Stuck in a relationship rut, the two one day stumble into a town called Schmigadoon, in which everyone is costumed as if they're living in a midcentury musical. The name refers to Lerner and Loewe's Brigadoon, a musical about a special town that emerges from nowhere. If you knew that, this show is most certainly for you.

The conceit is that neither of them can leave the town until they have found true love, whether it's with one another or with someone else. Their relationship soon collapses under the weight of their predicament -- and because she loves musicals, while he hates them -- with each getting multiple possible alternate love interests.

A clash in styles

Cecily Strong and Keegan-Michael Key in
Cecily Strong and Keegan-Michael Key in "Schmigadoon!" premiering July 16, 2021 on Apple TV+.


The two lead actors are both comedy performers primarily, with Key having co-starred on Key and Peele, the Netflix show Friends From College and a few movies, while Strong has spent the last decade-plus as a Saturday Night Live cast member. Both can sing passably, although not quite at the level of the Broadway stalwarts opposite them.

Indeed, the bulk of the supporting cast consists of accomplished stage veterans, like Alan Cumming, Kristin Chenoweth, Aaron Tveit, Anna Harada, and Ariana DeBose. Also on board in small parts are Martin Short (previously seen on the Apple TV+ show The Morning Show) and Jane Krakowski (also of Dickinson.) Fred Armisen, a fellow SNL veteran, also appears as the town priest.

While Key is a likable performer, his character is somewhat underwritten; we don't learn much about him except that he fears commitment and hates musicals. One big weakness of the show is that we're asked to root for the success of this couple, and their chemistry doesn't do quite enough to sell that.

As for Strong, she's much more of a presence and is clearly having a great time. She's one of those performers who's stayed on SNL for nearly a decade, rather than depart for a movie or TV career, and this performance shows her potential beyond the confines of 30 Rock. There is one scene in the second episode where she plays drunk, and it recalls her old "The Girl You Wish You Hadn't Started a Conversation With at a Party" character and her more recent Jeanine Pirro impression.

Ariana DeBose, who played a small part in Hamilton is a highlight of the supporting cast, as a "schoolmarm" who seems mostly inspired by Marian the Librarian from The Music Man, as is Cumming, playing a town mayor who's finding it very difficult to hind that he's gay.

The show's songs, which were written by co-creator Cinco Paul, are mostly very good, if not the most sophisticated compositions. "Suddenly," which can be called the show's love theme, is the strongest of them, appearing near the end of the fourth episode.

While they successfully juggle paying tribute to the source material and being their own thing, the songs aren't quite as wickedly subversive as those of Rachel Bloom's Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, which also frequently played with age-old Broadway tropes.

Short and sweet

Aaron Tveit and Cecily Strong in
Aaron Tveit and Cecily Strong in "Schmigadoon!" premiering July 16, 2021 on Apple TV+.


The success of Hamilton last year showed that there's a large appetite for musicals on streaming services, so it was probably only a matter of time before Apple took that type of dive itself.

Considering that it's only six episodes and that they're each so short, Schmigadoon! probably could have worked as a movie and not a TV show, and it's probably best fit for continuous binge-watching of any Apple TV+ show. While its central couple isn't the most convincing, Schmigadoon! offers fine world-building, hummable songs, and a likable and talented cast.

If you're not a fan of musicals, this show almost certainly isn't going to be for you. But if you're are, it probably will be.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 13
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 9,869member
    Sounds like modern day doubt, negativity and cynicism run head on into 1950's style confidence and optimism.

    This should be good!
  • Reply 2 of 13
    entropysentropys Posts: 3,011member
    I am into those mid 20th century musicals, and I can tell you this isn’t a desirable riff. In fact I suspect at heart it was written by people who think they should like old musicals, but deep down they really don’t.
    Schmigadoon! probably could have worked as a movie and not a TV show, 

    Yeah I think that might have been better that way.  Longer format serial episodes for bingeing are really good for novel level stories, vastly superior to movies or the mini series treatment on legacy broadcast TV. But single idea flicks (in this case, modern unhappy couple slotted into the unreal world of musicals) are probably better as just that, a one off movie.

    Maybe what I will do is not watch anymore until I can watch the lot in one go.  Oh, hang on, then I will have to start paying for ATV+.

    nah. Not at this stage.

    With many of its original shows, Apple TV+ is going for mass appeal. That's part of what got it 34 Emmy nominations, 20 of which were for Ted Lasso.
    Really? I mean really? So far, the only one is Ted Lasso, and maybe Morning Wars, but even then… ATV+ is not for the masses.  The vast majority of it is Very Public Television. For every Lasso I can put up an Oprah style show. Heck even Oprah!

    I guess I should be grateful there is no reality TV.

    edited July 16
  • Reply 3 of 13
    entropysentropys Posts: 3,011member
    Sounds like modern day doubt, negativity and cynicism run head on into 1950's style confidence and optimism.

    This should be good!
    Yeah, trés originale!
  • Reply 4 of 13
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,513moderator
    entropys said:
    I am into those mid 20th century musicals, and I can tell you this isn’t a desirable riff. In fact I suspect at heart it was written by people who think they should like old musicals, but deep down they really don’t.
    Schmigadoon! probably could have worked as a movie and not a TV show, 
    Yeah I think that might have been better that way.  Longer format serial episodes for bingeing are really good for novel level stories, vastly superior to movies or the mini series treatment on legacy broadcast TV. But single idea flicks (in this case, modern unhappy couple slotted into the unreal world of musicals) are probably better as just that, a one off movie.
    The following review was positive and said the same about being a single 170 minute movie instead of a 6-episode show:

    https://www.whattowatch.com/reviews/schmigadoon-review-an-out-of-the-box-musical-delight

    There are a couple of clips online:





    The reaction of the couple at the table probably reflects how a lot of couples will watch this show, one enjoying it, the other made to suffer through it.



    When Eddy Cue was describing Apple TV+ and their aim to be the best in the business, this kind of romantic comedy musical seems a bit out of place. A lot of TV shows they pick up seem like shows other platforms just wouldn't want because the target demographic is too narrow.

    The kind of musical I'd say would fit more with the aim of standing out in the industry would be something like The Greatest Showman:







    That took a few years to make and while it didn't get a good critical reception, is highly rated by the public and did well commercially.

    I think going the more cinematic route like with Greyhound will do a better job of boosting Apple TV+ than these forgettable TV shows, these aren't the kind of things that make people want to pay for the service. It must be difficult when they have to budget before the shows are made, they don't have much control over how it turns out. Occasionally there will be a diamond in the rough but it takes a lot of elements to come together to make something worthwhile. Apple is new to the business so it will take time to find their feet and they are starting to get more positive reception for shows. Once they get a feel for what works and what doesn't they will be able to refine their selection process for future shows.
    entropys
  • Reply 5 of 13
    lolliverlolliver Posts: 426member

    If you're not a fan of musicals, this show almost certainly isn't going to be for you. But if you're are, it probably will be.

    In other news: viewers who don’t like comedies shouldn’t watch Ted Lasso and if you hate workplace dramas don’t bother watching The Morning Show. 

    I haven’t seen any other AI reviews point out that people who are mot fans of a specific genre won’t like a show of that genre and yet this article mentioned it multiple times. Even mentioning it once would have been redundant. 

    Aside from that this review was surprisingly more positive than most of this authors other reviews. Which is surprising seeing as this is not one of Apples strongest shows compared to others. I’ve watched the first two episodes and definitely enjoyed it. The show was fun and light hearted and the supporting cast especially were impressive. 

    So far these reviews have rated great shows as bad and average shows as slightly above average. Starting to wonder if Apple’s first real stinker of a show (if they have one) will be assessed as a masterpiece on AI. 🤣
  • Reply 6 of 13
    Marvin said:
    entropys said:
    I am into those mid 20th century musicals, and I can tell you this isn’t a desirable riff. In fact I suspect at heart it was written by people who think they should like old musicals, but deep down they really don’t.
    Schmigadoon! probably could have worked as a movie and not a TV show, 
    Yeah I think that might have been better that way.  Longer format serial episodes for bingeing are really good for novel level stories, vastly superior to movies or the mini series treatment on legacy broadcast TV. But single idea flicks (in this case, modern unhappy couple slotted into the unreal world of musicals) are probably better as just that, a one off movie.
    The following review was positive and said the same about being a single 170 minute movie instead of a 6-episode show:

    https://www.whattowatch.com/reviews/schmigadoon-review-an-out-of-the-box-musical-delight

    There are a couple of clips online:

    The reaction of the couple at the table probably reflects how a lot of couples will watch this show, one enjoying it, the other made to suffer through it.

    When Eddy Cue was describing Apple TV+ and their aim to be the best in the business, this kind of romantic comedy musical seems a bit out of place. A lot of TV shows they pick up seem like shows other platforms just wouldn't want because the target demographic is too narrow.

    The kind of musical I'd say would fit more with the aim of standing out in the industry would be something like The Greatest Showman:

    That took a few years to make and while it didn't get a good critical reception, is highly rated by the public and did well commercially.

    I think going the more cinematic route like with Greyhound will do a better job of boosting Apple TV+ than these forgettable TV shows, these aren't the kind of things that make people want to pay for the service. It must be difficult when they have to budget before the shows are made, they don't have much control over how it turns out. Occasionally there will be a diamond in the rough but it takes a lot of elements to come together to make something worthwhile. Apple is new to the business so it will take time to find their feet and they are starting to get more positive reception for shows. Once they get a feel for what works and what doesn't they will be able to refine their selection process for future shows.
    I think that is pretty well said.
    So far I'm underwhelmed with the content. I tried Ted Lasso and liked it somewhat, I tried episode 1 of To The Moon (or called something like that) that just didn't hook me. 
    I do have the free trial run for a handful of more months so I'll use it.  The video quality is great.
    A quick web search right now to check what is in the AppleTV pipeline shows A LOT of content coming, but most of it doesn't look like it's for me. Off the 50 or 60 shows listed I'd maybe watch 9/11: Inside the President’s War Room, Foundation a SciFi series, an Untitled Chuck Barris limited series, a WW2 limited series about the Air Force, a World Champion Surfing documentary, maybe the one about an Alaska family that accidentally gets outed as being in the witness protection program. Don't know I'll have AppleTV to see them :-). I'll watch ted Lasso season 2.  But overall too much Oprah type Hollywood crowd content along with too much dark-depressing-people experiencing harsh life difficulties. For some that'll be great. To each their own. For me it's not going to work. 
    edited July 19
  • Reply 7 of 13
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 9,869member
    Marvin said:
    entropys said:
    I am into those mid 20th century musicals, and I can tell you this isn’t a desirable riff. In fact I suspect at heart it was written by people who think they should like old musicals, but deep down they really don’t.
    Schmigadoon! probably could have worked as a movie and not a TV show, 
    Yeah I think that might have been better that way.  Longer format serial episodes for bingeing are really good for novel level stories, vastly superior to movies or the mini series treatment on legacy broadcast TV. But single idea flicks (in this case, modern unhappy couple slotted into the unreal world of musicals) are probably better as just that, a one off movie.
    The following review was positive and said the same about being a single 170 minute movie instead of a 6-episode show:

    https://www.whattowatch.com/reviews/schmigadoon-review-an-out-of-the-box-musical-delight

    There are a couple of clips online:

    The reaction of the couple at the table probably reflects how a lot of couples will watch this show, one enjoying it, the other made to suffer through it.

    When Eddy Cue was describing Apple TV+ and their aim to be the best in the business, this kind of romantic comedy musical seems a bit out of place. A lot of TV shows they pick up seem like shows other platforms just wouldn't want because the target demographic is too narrow.

    The kind of musical I'd say would fit more with the aim of standing out in the industry would be something like The Greatest Showman:

    That took a few years to make and while it didn't get a good critical reception, is highly rated by the public and did well commercially.

    I think going the more cinematic route like with Greyhound will do a better job of boosting Apple TV+ than these forgettable TV shows, these aren't the kind of things that make people want to pay for the service. It must be difficult when they have to budget before the shows are made, they don't have much control over how it turns out. Occasionally there will be a diamond in the rough but it takes a lot of elements to come together to make something worthwhile. Apple is new to the business so it will take time to find their feet and they are starting to get more positive reception for shows. Once they get a feel for what works and what doesn't they will be able to refine their selection process for future shows.

    I would say that:  If you judge this as a musical it will fail -- because it isn't.   It's using 1950's musicals as parody to contrast two societies.  1950's:   happy, optimistic, "no problems here!", everybody conforms & agrees -- and artificial.
    2020's:   individualistic, cynical, reality based.

    That said, I am (right now) agreeing that this would have worked better as a movie than a series (at least from the first episode that seemed to be all intro leading up to something else).

    But I disagree with others here that this had anything to do with musicals -- even though 1950's style musicals dominate (all the way down to the fake trees and artificial colorization).
    Rather, it is using the 1950's musicals as parody as a tool to contrast 1950's society (happy, optimistic and moralistic) to that of current society (more cynical and pessimistic).

    The videos you showed of the Greatest Showman had much better, more modernized musicals -- but that wasn't the point of Schmigadoon.  Even the title gives a hint -- its a parody, not a musical.

    This could go a LOT of different ways.  I'm looking forward to watching the next episode.
    Right now, they think they are in love -- but the leprechaun tells them its not good enough.  But they have no idea what he's talking about.  His standards are foreign to them.

    One way this could go is with the Carnival conman:   His dilemma is whether he should give up his male independence and be tied down to a house with kids and tractor that always needs fixin'.  While she enjoys being woo'd and feels flattered by his attention and is quickly falling into the role of the female who's goal in life is have a house with kids and a tractor that always needs fixin'.





    edited July 19 tenthousandthings
  • Reply 8 of 13
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,829member
    lolliver said:

    If you're not a fan of musicals, this show almost certainly isn't going to be for you. But if you're are, it probably will be.

    In other news: viewers who don’t like comedies shouldn’t watch Ted Lasso and if you hate workplace dramas don’t bother watching The Morning Show. 

    I haven’t seen any other AI reviews point out that people who are mot fans of a specific genre won’t like a show of that genre and yet this article mentioned it multiple times. Even mentioning it once would have been redundant. 

    Aside from that this review was surprisingly more positive than most of this authors other reviews. Which is surprising seeing as this is not one of Apples strongest shows compared to others. I’ve watched the first two episodes and definitely enjoyed it. The show was fun and light hearted and the supporting cast especially were impressive. 

    So far these reviews have rated great shows as bad and average shows as slightly above average. Starting to wonder if Apple’s first real stinker of a show (if they have one) will be assessed as a masterpiece on AI. ߤ㦬t;/div>
    AI got badly burned with their Ted Lasso review, with just about every commenter turning in a response that was a better read and bang on the money. I imagine this has led to this slightly watery approach.

    I’m going to give this one a miss, but I see where they’re going.  The pandemic has been hard on theatre fans, and I think this will appeal to them.  


    edited July 18
  • Reply 9 of 13
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 9,869member
    While I still think that this is more about a clash of cultures -- 1950's vs 2020's than about music.   I have to say that it works a whole lot better if you watch it with a good home theater set up.

    As focused as Apple has been on music and now theater, I find it surprising that they are discontinued their one and only foray into Home Theater:  The Homepods that could be connected to Apple TV and emulate Dolby Atmos if set up as a stereo pair.   They weren't the top of the line for home theater, but they were very respectable.
  • Reply 10 of 13
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 748member
    Rayz2016 said:
    lolliver said:

    If you're not a fan of musicals, this show almost certainly isn't going to be for you. But if you're are, it probably will be.

    In other news: viewers who don’t like comedies shouldn’t watch Ted Lasso and if you hate workplace dramas don’t bother watching The Morning Show. 

    I haven’t seen any other AI reviews point out that people who are mot fans of a specific genre won’t like a show of that genre and yet this article mentioned it multiple times. Even mentioning it once would have been redundant. 

    Aside from that this review was surprisingly more positive than most of this authors other reviews. Which is surprising seeing as this is not one of Apples strongest shows compared to others. I’ve watched the first two episodes and definitely enjoyed it. The show was fun and light hearted and the supporting cast especially were impressive. 

    So far these reviews have rated great shows as bad and average shows as slightly above average. Starting to wonder if Apple’s first real stinker of a show (if they have one) will be assessed as a masterpiece on AI. ߤ㦬t;/div>
    AI got badly burned with their Ted Lasso review, with just about every commenter turning in a response that was a better read and bang on the money. I imagine this has led to this slightly watery approach.

    I’m going to give this one a miss, but I see where they’re going.  The pandemic has been hard on theatre fans, and I think this will appeal to them.  


    They’ve been badly burned on the last several reviews, as well. One even got so brutal that they had to delete the comments for it, lol. I forgot which show it was for, and I can’t find it now, but it was either Physical or Lisey’s Story, I believe.
    The forums have definitely proven to be extremely  entertaining and a much more accurate barometer for the quality of the new shows for me. But, based on the underwhelming and anemic reaction here, I’ll be giving Schmig a pass also. 
    edited July 18
  • Reply 11 of 13
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 9,869member
    Japhey said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    lolliver said:

    If you're not a fan of musicals, this show almost certainly isn't going to be for you. But if you're are, it probably will be.

    In other news: viewers who don’t like comedies shouldn’t watch Ted Lasso and if you hate workplace dramas don’t bother watching The Morning Show. 

    I haven’t seen any other AI reviews point out that people who are mot fans of a specific genre won’t like a show of that genre and yet this article mentioned it multiple times. Even mentioning it once would have been redundant. 

    Aside from that this review was surprisingly more positive than most of this authors other reviews. Which is surprising seeing as this is not one of Apples strongest shows compared to others. I’ve watched the first two episodes and definitely enjoyed it. The show was fun and light hearted and the supporting cast especially were impressive. 

    So far these reviews have rated great shows as bad and average shows as slightly above average. Starting to wonder if Apple’s first real stinker of a show (if they have one) will be assessed as a masterpiece on AI. ߤ㦬t;/div>
    AI got badly burned with their Ted Lasso review, with just about every commenter turning in a response that was a better read and bang on the money. I imagine this has led to this slightly watery approach.

    I’m going to give this one a miss, but I see where they’re going.  The pandemic has been hard on theatre fans, and I think this will appeal to them.  


    They’ve been badly burned on the last several reviews, as well. One even got so brutal that they had to delete the comments for it, lol. I forgot which show it was for, and I can’t find it now, but it was either Physical or Lisey’s Story, I believe.
    The forums have definitely proven to be extremely  entertaining and a much more accurate barometer for the quality of the new shows for me. But, based on the underwhelming and anemic reaction here, I’ll be giving Schmig a pass also. 
    As I said in a previous review of this show:  it sounds more like "Pleasantville" where a couple travels back in time to the 1950's
    In that show, the culture of the 50's woke up and affected the couple (in that case teenage siblings) while they woke up and affected the culture.  And I'm seeing hints of that in this show -- especially in the 3rd episode.

    But the review and most of the comments are about the hocky. artificial music and the plastic culture and characters.  But then the culture of the 1950's was plastic and artificial -- so it may just be a caricature.  For example:  in one song the ladies stuck their bottoms out while the men gave them a couple smacks -- and the woman objects that that is not appropriate - unless it's consensual!   Then its ok...   2020's, meet the 1950's!

    I think the review and most of the comments may be missing the whole point of the show.   I would give it chance.  (Unless you really can't stand the 50's musicals -- because, like the couple, you just can't avoid them.   "Oh no!  Not another song!")
  • Reply 12 of 13
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 748member
    Japhey said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    lolliver said:

    If you're not a fan of musicals, this show almost certainly isn't going to be for you. But if you're are, it probably will be.

    In other news: viewers who don’t like comedies shouldn’t watch Ted Lasso and if you hate workplace dramas don’t bother watching The Morning Show. 

    I haven’t seen any other AI reviews point out that people who are mot fans of a specific genre won’t like a show of that genre and yet this article mentioned it multiple times. Even mentioning it once would have been redundant. 

    Aside from that this review was surprisingly more positive than most of this authors other reviews. Which is surprising seeing as this is not one of Apples strongest shows compared to others. I’ve watched the first two episodes and definitely enjoyed it. The show was fun and light hearted and the supporting cast especially were impressive. 

    So far these reviews have rated great shows as bad and average shows as slightly above average. Starting to wonder if Apple’s first real stinker of a show (if they have one) will be assessed as a masterpiece on AI. ߤ㦬t;/div>
    AI got badly burned with their Ted Lasso review, with just about every commenter turning in a response that was a better read and bang on the money. I imagine this has led to this slightly watery approach.

    I’m going to give this one a miss, but I see where they’re going.  The pandemic has been hard on theatre fans, and I think this will appeal to them.  


    They’ve been badly burned on the last several reviews, as well. One even got so brutal that they had to delete the comments for it, lol. I forgot which show it was for, and I can’t find it now, but it was either Physical or Lisey’s Story, I believe.
    The forums have definitely proven to be extremely  entertaining and a much more accurate barometer for the quality of the new shows for me. But, based on the underwhelming and anemic reaction here, I’ll be giving Schmig a pass also. 
    As I said in a previous review of this show:  it sounds more like "Pleasantville" where a couple travels back in time to the 1950's
    In that show, the culture of the 50's woke up and affected the couple (in that case teenage siblings) while they woke up and affected the culture.  And I'm seeing hints of that in this show -- especially in the 3rd episode.

    But the review and most of the comments are about the hocky. artificial music and the plastic culture and characters.  But then the culture of the 1950's was plastic and artificial -- so it may just be a caricature.  For example:  in one song the ladies stuck their bottoms out while the men gave them a couple smacks -- and the woman objects that that is not appropriate - unless it's consensual!   Then its ok...   2020's, meet the 1950's!

    I think the review and most of the comments may be missing the whole point of the show.   I would give it chance.  (Unless you really can't stand the 50's musicals -- because, like the couple, you just can't avoid them.   "Oh no!  Not another song!")
    I changed my mind and gave it a chance. It’s pretty good…I ended up liking it much more than I expected to. I won’t bore with my analysis except to say…Key is hilarious, as usual. Chenoweth and Cumming are brilliant, as usual. And thank God Fred Armisen, who I loathe with a passion, is kept to a bare minimum so far. But where, o where, is Jane Krakowski?
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 13 of 13
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 9,869member
    Japhey said:
    Japhey said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    lolliver said:

    If you're not a fan of musicals, this show almost certainly isn't going to be for you. But if you're are, it probably will be.

    In other news: viewers who don’t like comedies shouldn’t watch Ted Lasso and if you hate workplace dramas don’t bother watching The Morning Show. 

    I haven’t seen any other AI reviews point out that people who are mot fans of a specific genre won’t like a show of that genre and yet this article mentioned it multiple times. Even mentioning it once would have been redundant. 

    Aside from that this review was surprisingly more positive than most of this authors other reviews. Which is surprising seeing as this is not one of Apples strongest shows compared to others. I’ve watched the first two episodes and definitely enjoyed it. The show was fun and light hearted and the supporting cast especially were impressive. 

    So far these reviews have rated great shows as bad and average shows as slightly above average. Starting to wonder if Apple’s first real stinker of a show (if they have one) will be assessed as a masterpiece on AI. ߤ㦬t;/div>
    AI got badly burned with their Ted Lasso review, with just about every commenter turning in a response that was a better read and bang on the money. I imagine this has led to this slightly watery approach.

    I’m going to give this one a miss, but I see where they’re going.  The pandemic has been hard on theatre fans, and I think this will appeal to them.  


    They’ve been badly burned on the last several reviews, as well. One even got so brutal that they had to delete the comments for it, lol. I forgot which show it was for, and I can’t find it now, but it was either Physical or Lisey’s Story, I believe.
    The forums have definitely proven to be extremely  entertaining and a much more accurate barometer for the quality of the new shows for me. But, based on the underwhelming and anemic reaction here, I’ll be giving Schmig a pass also. 
    As I said in a previous review of this show:  it sounds more like "Pleasantville" where a couple travels back in time to the 1950's
    In that show, the culture of the 50's woke up and affected the couple (in that case teenage siblings) while they woke up and affected the culture.  And I'm seeing hints of that in this show -- especially in the 3rd episode.

    But the review and most of the comments are about the hocky. artificial music and the plastic culture and characters.  But then the culture of the 1950's was plastic and artificial -- so it may just be a caricature.  For example:  in one song the ladies stuck their bottoms out while the men gave them a couple smacks -- and the woman objects that that is not appropriate - unless it's consensual!   Then its ok...   2020's, meet the 1950's!

    I think the review and most of the comments may be missing the whole point of the show.   I would give it chance.  (Unless you really can't stand the 50's musicals -- because, like the couple, you just can't avoid them.   "Oh no!  Not another song!")
    I changed my mind and gave it a chance. It’s pretty good…I ended up liking it much more than I expected to. I won’t bore with my analysis except to say…Key is hilarious, as usual. Chenoweth and Cumming are brilliant, as usual. And thank God Fred Armisen, who I loathe with a passion, is kept to a bare minimum so far. But where, o where, is Jane Krakowski?

    Glad you gave it a chance.  I find it growing on me.

    "Are you gay?"
    "I try to be happy"

    2020's,  meet 1950's....

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