'High-end' Apple Silicon iMac may not arrive until 2022

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware
A high-end iMac release may not be until 2022, according to a leaker, with it apparently being launched later than other anticipated Mac updates to the "M1X" chip to maximize attention on the rest of the lineup.

The 24-inch iMac.
The 24-inch iMac.


Apple is expected to introduce more Mac products running on Apple Silicon before the end of 2021. While rumors point to a second iMac using Apple's chip family as being on the way, it seems that it won't be part of an expected launch lineup this fall.

According to serial leaker "Dylandkt" on Twitter, a "high end iMac" will be released in 2022. The iOS developer later explained that the model is not expected to be released in the fourth quarter alongside "other M1X Macs."

Dylan reasons this to be the case because "Apple simply does not want their devices to compete for attention." There is also the belief that delays in product releases have led to the extended timetable.

Apple is thought to be working on new models of a 14-inch MacBook Pro, a 16-inch MacBook Pro, an updated MacBook Air, and an overhauled Mac mini.

As for when in 2022 to anticipate a new bigger iMac, the leaker insists the delays makes it hard to determine a specific schedule for release, since it can "change quickly."

In April, it was rumored by another leaker that a bigger iMac was in development, one that would have a larger viewable area than the existing largest 27-inch iMac. In July, another report chimed in to say a new iMac was on the way to replace the 27-inch model, though with a potentially bigger screen and using an M2 chip.

The leaker does have a track record. He was accurate in predicting that what turned out to be the 24-inch iMac reveal would focus on the lower end, versus a 27-inch replacement. About a half-year before it happened, he also predicted that the M1 was going to come to the iPad Pro.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 16
    jkichlinejkichline Posts: 1,352member
    This is obvious. They’ve just released the first iMac M1. Why would the update that immediately in October? They will rather focus on the pro market segment where additional screen outputs and higher performance are key.
  • Reply 2 of 16
    techconctechconc Posts: 174member
    jkichline said:
    This is obvious. They’ve just released the first iMac M1. Why would the update that immediately in October? They will rather focus on the pro market segment where additional screen outputs and higher performance are key.
    Nobody is expecting an update to the low end iMac.  The 24" iMac replaced the former 21" low end iMac series.  Apple still needs to address the higher end 27" iMac replacements.  I'm waiting for that upgrade as well.  While the 16GB M1 is impressive (for a low end chip), it doesn't address the needs of higher end users.
    williamlondonpatchythepiratebaconstangseanjdocno42d_2
  • Reply 3 of 16
    thttht Posts: 4,030member
    This type of news could be a consequence of the pandemic. If the pandemic was going to cause a problem, it’s going to be in 2021 and 2022, assuming enough people get vaccinated by the end of this year, which seems more of a hope than a plan now. 

    In 2020, all the M1 hardware development was done in 2019. What they were working on was getting the supply chain for mass production ready. Hardware that was planned for 2021 release? Yeah, I could see a slowdown there. 
  • Reply 4 of 16
    blastdoorblastdoor Posts: 2,435member
    tht said:
    This type of news could be a consequence of the pandemic. If the pandemic was going to cause a problem, it’s going to be in 2021 and 2022, assuming enough people get vaccinated by the end of this year, which seems more of a hope than a plan now. 

    In 2020, all the M1 hardware development was done in 2019. What they were working on was getting the supply chain for mass production ready. Hardware that was planned for 2021 release? Yeah, I could see a slowdown there. 
    Maybe so. Although they had said it would take two years to complete the transition. If we get to the end of this year and the only models left needing an update are the big iMac and Mac Pro, then they might actually be right on track for making their two year timeline. 


    williamlondon
  • Reply 5 of 16
    hammeroftruthhammeroftruth Posts: 1,084member
    This probably coincides with the other AI article about Apple attending NAB.  IMHO, I would think there would be some sort of hardware announcement at that time.
  • Reply 6 of 16
    mpantonempantone Posts: 1,609member
    This probably coincides with the other AI article about Apple attending NAB.  IMHO, I would think there would be some sort of hardware announcement at that time.
    This makes zero sense. Apple does not announce new hardware at third party events. They only announce new hardware at their own events. Same with major software (operating systems, etc.).

    Nobody sane who follows Apple believed that an Apple Silicon Mac Pro was imminent this year. After all Apple themselves clearly stated that their transition to Apple Silicon was a two-year process and we aren't even at fourteen months after the unveiling during last year's WWDC in June.

    Apple does not like to share the limelight with other companies. That's why they bailed out of the Macworld Expo years ago: they make announcements on their own schedule, not someone else's.
    edited July 26 JapheyStrangeDaysseanj
  • Reply 7 of 16
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,311member
    I'm interested to see if Apple puts a real discrete GPU in the 27" iMac. If so it'll need a CPU with many more PCIe lanes than the M1 has. The 5K display needs some serious grunt when rendering full-resolution 3D, my 2020 iMac with a fairly pokey Vega Pro 48 struggles at times. A tiny low power integrated GPU has no chance.
  • Reply 8 of 16
    My chips are still on a 30' screen with 5K5 resolution.
    What they call the chip???  Maybe by the time it comes out, they'll be up to an M2X.
    edited July 26
  • Reply 9 of 16
    Perhaps Apple is having issues designing a high performance M1(X). And it’s not like the iMac will hurt the MacBooks feelings by getting more attention. I thought the iMac and MacBook were aimed at different people/needs.

    If the performance is on par, I’d buy an iMac M1X regardless if it’s 2021 or 2022. 
  • Reply 10 of 16
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,551member
    Screw "high end" - just ship a freaking Apple Silicon iMac with a larger screen already!
    d_2patchythepirate
  • Reply 11 of 16
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,551member
    techconc said:
    Nobody is expecting an update to the low end iMac.  The 24" iMac replaced the former 21" low end iMac series.  Apple still needs to address the higher end 27" iMac replacements.  I'm waiting for that upgrade as well.  While the 16GB M1 is impressive (for a low end chip), it doesn't address the needs of higher end users.
    16GB is just fine for the vast majority of people - just release an M1 with a larger screen already!
    If they want to come out with an iMac Pro replacement - fine - but it was asinine to only update the smaller model and not address the larger screen too.

    This is why all in ones suck - I sure as hell hope the rumors of them finally coming up with new displays are true.
    edited July 26
  • Reply 12 of 16
    michelb76michelb76 Posts: 288member
    The danger with the A/M series chips is making something that lasts longer than the previous models. Pretty sure they could make an affordable perfect machine, but then they would kill their sales for the next few years.
  • Reply 13 of 16
    mpantonempantone Posts: 1,609member
    elijahg said:
    I'm interested to see if Apple puts a real discrete GPU in the 27" iMac. If so it'll need a CPU with many more PCIe lanes than the M1 has. The 5K display needs some serious grunt when rendering full-resolution 3D, my 2020 iMac with a fairly pokey Vega Pro 48 struggles at times. A tiny low power integrated GPU has no chance.
    My guess is that Mac Hardware Engineering is already aware that a wimpy integrated GPU won't be sufficient for an ASi Mac Pro.

    So either they include a powerful discrete GPU or they create a powerful integrated GPU.

    From a thermal design standpoint, having a discrete GPU is probably more likely. Perhaps the more interesting question is how they will handle the Neural Engine. Will they put that circuitry on its own chip?

    One unknown is whether or not Apple would use a Neural Engine-only chip in their own server hardware; I wouldn't expect them to productize this. It would be used for their own cloud operations (Siri, image processing, video processing, whatever).

    I would not be surprised if somewhere in a lab in Cupertino, there are prototype task-specific ASICs: 3D rasterization, AI, and signal processing (especially video encoding).
    edited July 27 patchythepirate
  • Reply 14 of 16
    darkvaderdarkvader Posts: 594member
    docno42 said:
    Screw "high end" - just ship a freaking Apple Silicon iMac with a larger screen already!

    Why?  We can get a much better Intel iMac 27" today.  We don't need a crippled Apple silicon version.  16GB RAM vs 128GB RAM capability is kind of a no-brainer, Intel is a better choice than M1.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 15 of 16
    robabarobaba Posts: 159member
    mpantone said:

    —clip—

    So either they include a powerful discrete GPU or they create a powerful integrated GPU.

    All indications are to the later solution.

    —clip—

    One unknown is whether or not Apple would use a Neural Engine-only chip in their own server hardware; I wouldn't expect them to productize this. It would be used for their own cloud operations (Siri, image processing, video processing, whatever).

    No—this makes no sense.  Apple has indicated all ML will be on-device only.

    I would not be surprised if somewhere in a lab in Cupertino, there are prototype task-specific ASICs: 3D rasterization, AI, and signal processing (especially video encoding).

    I expect the following are currently projects of the ASi group
    • ray-tracing GPU cores
    • Reworked Neural Engine
    • New high-performance and high-efficiency CPU cores
    • A ProRes acceleration core to replace the FPGA on the Afterburner card.
    • Improved analog signal processor 
    • Next-gen low power modem 
    • High speed, high bandwidth, low latency fabric, both on-chip and on-board

    edited July 28 patchythepirate
  • Reply 16 of 16
    If this story is true, that's a terrible business decision. It's not Apple's own products it is competing against. It is the larger Intel/AMD based computer industry. Steve Jobs would have known this and gone for the jugular with the M1/M1X chips. If Jobs had been running the company would have seen a $300 Mac Nano on the market by now. Yes there would have been reduced revenues at first but this would have set up Apple to dominate the desktop and laptop computer industry in a few years time the way it did in the music and mobile phone industries. It amazes me how Apple can expertly use long term thinking to create its technology but thinks extremely short term when it comes to product planning and pricing.
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