Apple sees positive customer reaction to App Tracking Transparency

Posted:
in General Discussion
Apple CEO Tim Cook said the company is seeing "quite a bit" of positive reaction from customers to its App Tracking Transparency privacy feature.

Credit: Apple
Credit: Apple


During the company's Q3 2021 earnings call, Cook was asked how the change to Identifier for Advertisers tracking tag handling was developing, and how it was influencing the trajectory of advertising within Apple's services.

"We've been getting quite a bit of customer reaction, positive reaction to being able to make the decision ... on whether to be tracked or not," Cook said, adding that the feature seems to "be going very well from a user point of view."

Apple's App Tracking Transparency feature requires app makers to obtain consent from users before tracking them across websites and apps using IDFA or other tracking tags. The feature was released earlier in 2021 in iOS 14.5.

According to the latest estimates from marketing firms, about 80% of iOS users are using ATT to block tracking on their own devices. Because of that, many advertisers are seeing an average revenue decline of about 15% to 20%, some estimates say.

A May survey of about 3,000 iPhone and iPad users in the U.S. found that about 73% of respondents agreed with the new privacy changes.

Read on AppleInsider
patchythepirate

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 6
    chadbagchadbag Posts: 1,469member
    I wish these articles would be more clear.  Who is seeing a 15%-30% reduction in revenue?
    1.  The people selling the actual app/widget/service being advertised?
    2. The ad broker (network) who (that) sells the ad space to the widget maker/service provider?
    3.  The ad space provider (for example, AI)?

     I asked the same question a few weeks ago in an article on this ATT topic.  


    edited July 27 Alex_Vwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 6
    BeatsBeats Posts: 2,527member
    That number would be higher if the manipulative app developers didn’t “warn” us about how great tracking is with cute little graphics before Apple asks.

    I’m hoping this is a new era of privacy for Apple. With the positive feedback maybe we’ll see an “identity blocker” where all cookies and tracking are automatically set to “off” with no annoying pop-ups and if legal, a default ad blocker better than any on the market. What would be great is an ad blocker that allows ads on webpages but blanks them out and shrinks them like this:
    ______________

    So the site THINKS you’re receiving ads but they’re basically collapsed.

    Or better yet it Apple can create a way where the site thinks you’re receiving an ad but it’s gone altogether!
    Alex_Vcaladanianpatchythepiratewatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 6
    What I don’t like about this article and specifically Apple’s comments is they aren’t plain and straight forward. “ATT” and “third party”. I understand it but the average person is clueless to how significantly this blocks your private data from being collected. 

    What I like about this article is how much it drives the paid trolls, trolls and haters into a tizzy to hear this, then have nothing coherent to say in their whirling attempt to defend Google (and Facebook’s) massive private data collection on users. They’ll reply with “they all do it”, there’s Pegasus!, you use the internet so isn’t private! and more. I Love it When the subject comes up and the trolls/haters have to find someway to try and obscure the truth.  
    Alex_Vcaladanianpatchythepiratewatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 6
    What I don’t like about this article and specifically Apple’s comments is they aren’t plain and straight forward. “ATT” and “third party”. I understand it but the average person is clueless to how significantly this blocks your private data from being collected. 

    What I like about this article is how much it drives the paid trolls, trolls and haters into a tizzy to hear this, then have nothing coherent to say in their whirling attempt to defend Google (and Facebook’s) massive private data collection on users. They’ll reply with “they all do it”, there’s Pegasus!, you use the internet so isn’t private! and more. I Love it When the subject comes up and the trolls/haters have to find someway to try and obscure the truth.  
    I don't know bud. Your comment kinda makes it pretty clear you don't understand it at all.  You are the average person you're attempting to disparage.  Apple's explanation of ATT is pretty plain and straight forward.  Simply put, App Tracking Transparency blocks 3rd party cross-site tracking.  That's it.  What the average person may be assuming (you included) is ATT blocks tracking... period.  It does not.  It only blocks a specifically defined (by Apple) type of tracking.  This is how Apple defines tracking: Tracking refers to the act of linking user or device data collected from your app with user or device data collected from other companies’ apps, websites, or offline properties for targeted advertising or advertising measurement purposes. Tracking also refers to sharing user or device data with data brokers. - Apple  It also has a list of exceptions to the 3rd party tracking rule. 

    App Tracking Transparency doesn't block your data from being collected.  There are other mechanisms in place that do that have done that for a while now.  ATT performs a specific singular function, not the all encompassing role you seem to think it does.  It's also kinda funny to read your "trolls and haters" missive about data collection when it's fairly obvious you really know far less than you think you do.  Now I'm far from an expert, but at least I attempted to learn the facts.  You really should as well.  And yes, they all do it.  And by it, I mean collect massive amounts of data on users.  What they do with that data is where the differences lie.  That's the distinction you're missing.
    muthuk_vanalingamcaladanian
  • Reply 5 of 6
    What I don’t like about this article and specifically Apple’s comments is they aren’t plain and straight forward. “ATT” and “third party”. I understand it but the average person is clueless to how significantly this blocks your private data from being collected. 

    What I like about this article is how much it drives the paid trolls, trolls and haters into a tizzy to hear this, then have nothing coherent to say in their whirling attempt to defend Google (and Facebook’s) massive private data collection on users. They’ll reply with “they all do it”, there’s Pegasus!, you use the internet so isn’t private! and more. I Love it When the subject comes up and the trolls/haters have to find someway to try and obscure the truth.  
    I don't know bud. Your comment kinda makes it pretty clear you don't understand it at all.  You are the average person you're attempting to disparage.  Apple's explanation of ATT is pretty plain and straight forward.  Simply put, App Tracking Transparency blocks 3rd party cross-site tracking.  That's it.  What the average person may be assuming (you included) is ATT blocks tracking... period.  It does not.  It only blocks a specifically defined (by Apple) type of tracking.  This is how Apple defines tracking: Tracking refers to the act of linking user or device data collected from your app with user or device data collected from other companies’ apps, websites, or offline properties for targeted advertising or advertising measurement purposes. Tracking also refers to sharing user or device data with data brokers. - Apple  It also has a list of exceptions to the 3rd party tracking rule. 

    App Tracking Transparency doesn't block your data from being collected.  There are other mechanisms in place that do that have done that for a while now.  ATT performs a specific singular function, not the all encompassing role you seem to think it does.  It's also kinda funny to read your "trolls and haters" missive about data collection when it's fairly obvious you really know far less than you think you do.  Now I'm far from an expert, but at least I attempted to learn the facts.  You really should as well.  And yes, they all do it.  And by it, I mean collect massive amounts of data on users.  What they do with that data is where the differences lie.  That's the distinction you're missing.

    Well you can go reread my previous comments on the subject, bud. I'm going to guess you don't understand from that comment and reading the entire body of your comment. Great usage of the impression 'it just stops this little thing over here'. Better than the 'they all do it' most of you try to push.
    So let me school you first. The average user, if asked about ATT, would say "the wireless company?". You say "third party" to the average user and they would say "I'm not really sure". BTW, the metrics of who understands what on data mining is available from privacy advocates for your perusing. But I'm sure you've read it all as you have demonstrated a real knowledge on it. 
    For anyone reading this, except CloudTalking, third party app tracking is HUGE! (or as the average user completely understand ATT Third party -- just wow). This is likely the biggest crux of privacy data mining there is, mining private data via third party app tracking. This allows one App to track you across other apps (i.e. almost everything you are doing on your phone). Now to you that's just this little think, good for you Bud. You're super knowledgable on the subject so you're all set. But hey, since first party tracking of private data is such a knowledge spot for you, try this bud: go request your private data from Google, Facebook, Apple. They all must make it available to you for free. I'm sure you've already done it but what the heck, try it again. You can explain all about how much it is just ATT and, putting ATT aside, gives you a view of first party tracking too.
    Look forward to you telling us all about the comparisons in what Data shows up. I've already done it and have advocated previously for doing it here, bud.
    patchythepirate
  • Reply 6 of 6
    You couldn't even school me on your best day, and today isn't even close to your best.  The average user understands context.  To borrow from a silly TV show, even a 5th grader understands context.  Within the context of this post about App Tracking Transparency,  no one would think ATT related to the telecom.  Why on earth would they?The idea of someone randomly associating that ATT with a telecom when a perfectly rational explanation is sitting in the post with App Tracking Transparency... yeah that smacks of desperation in support of a specious argument.  Even if one accidentally disregarded the context of the overall post,  the disregard would have to be intentional to miss the context of the sentence in which the ATT is used.  

    Hyperbole does your argument no favors.  Your 3rd party tracking fud lacks one important thing: substantiating evidence.  I doubt you could produce one shred even the flimsiest evidence to support your claims.  Not sure why you repeated Apple's definition of tracking, I included Apple's verbatim explanation of tracking in my post.  Ironically, your paraphrased explanation of ATT is the only factually and topically relevant piece of info in your post.

    First party tracking has nothing to do with ATT, so you can throw that little red herring back into the ocean.  No one is taking the bait on that deflective argument.  Your time would be better spent understanding what ATT does and doesn't do and how it actually impacts users.  That's the info you should be spreading.  Not your current brand of info.
    muthuk_vanalingam
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