Apple Watch credited with saving man's life after fall

Posted:
in Apple Watch
Apple Watch has been credited with saving yet another life after alerting emergency services to what could have been a fatal fall.

Schneider Apple Watch


On July 12, 25-year-old Brandon Schneider of Long Island visited the emergency room after suffering abdominal pain and a misdiagnosed kidney stone, reports People.

Schneider asked to use the bathroom, where he lost consciousness and fell to the ground.

"I remember washing my hands and thinking to myself, is something going to happen," Schneider said in an interview with a local ABC affiliate. "I don't remember falling to the ground, or hitting my head, or anything of the events that followed."

Luckily, Schneider was wearing an Apple Watch. The device's fall detection feature recognized the event and alerted emergency services, as well as his father who was with him at the time.

"My Apple Watch detected a hard fall, and I did not respond to the like haptic message that requires a response and 45 seconds," Schneider said.

Subsequent CT scans revealed a fractured skull and multiple hematomas that were growing in size. He underwent brain surgery and woke up four days later.

Though he doesn't remember much about the incident or surrounding days, he is on the mend and credits his survival to Apple Watch and an active lifestyle. Schneider is a Peloton Sales Specialist and a Level I certified running coach.

"Those who have an Apple watch, may be able to set up their emergency contacts, which I don't know what sparked the idea in me sometime before this incident occurred to make sure I had that setup, but I want to encourage people to do that," he said.

Fall detection was introduced with Apple Watch Series 4 and is part of a biometric monitoring suite that covers heart health, blood oxygen levels, mobility, fitness and more.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    I should get one for my mother of 97…
    edited August 2021 watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 11
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    You just never know.
    Also, this is a selling point for the LTE function:  the watch doesn't have to be near your phone to call.
    scstrrfwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 11
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,523member
    You just never know.
    Also, this is a selling point for the LTE function:  the watch doesn't have to be near your phone to call.
    Agreed. That's exactly why I bought my wife the LTE Watch, she cycles, and runs and this is an essential safety device IMHO as well as a mobile wrist phone.
    GeorgeBMachcrefugeescstrrfwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 11
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    I should get one for my mother of 97…
    Y E S !  (preferably one with LTE)
    Especially if she is mobile.

    She can put it on in the morning and take it off for charging when she gets up in the morning --- even wear it in the most dangerous place for a senior:   The shower.    In addition, it can be used as a timer for the stove and a reminder for taking medications. 

    Also, she'll always get your phone calls or be able to call you if needed.

    There are many reasons for a senior to wear one and not many good ones for not.   Yeh, money is one -- but the cost of the watch is less than the cost of a few weeks in the hospital.

    scstrrfwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 11
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    MacPro said:
    You just never know.
    Also, this is a selling point for the LTE function:  the watch doesn't have to be near your phone to call.
    Agreed. That's exactly why I bought my wife the LTE Watch, she cycles, and runs and this is an essential safety device IMHO as well as a mobile wrist phone.

    If she runs, Airpod Pros are a great compliment to the watch:   You don't have a phone bouncing around, the Airpod pros not only have great sound but transperency mode to help you hear what's going on around you.

    The other day I was out for a run and decided to stop at a new ice cream shop (a rare treat for me!).  As usual I had no cash or cards on me, so I paid for the ice cream using ApplePay on from my watch.
    scstrrfwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 11
    bageljoeybageljoey Posts: 1,985member
    I often go mountain biking on my own. I’ve been thinking I should enable the fall detection but I’m worried that I would trip the warning.  
    Would it be possible to not notice the pre-call haptic advisement?  The riding can be intense and I don’t want to be calling 911 on accident!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 11
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    bageljoey said:
    I often go mountain biking on my own. I’ve been thinking I should enable the fall detection but I’m worried that I would trip the warning.  
    Would it be possible to not notice the pre-call haptic advisement?  The riding can be intense and I don’t want to be calling 911 on accident!

    That would be a possibility.   Not only could the rough ride trigger a false fall detection, but the juggling might obscure the haptic feedback of the notification (it's not very loud -- it's mostly the vibration).   But, actually, I'm not sure about the false fall detection:  your hands on the handle bars might stop that -- i get them while playing basketball or touch football with sudden movements.

    But, you can turn fall detection off and enjoy all the other benefits of the watch -- like being able to call for help if needed.

  • Reply 8 of 11
    bageljoeybageljoey Posts: 1,985member
    bageljoey said:
    I often go mountain biking on my own. I’ve been thinking I should enable the fall detection but I’m worried that I would trip the warning.  
    Would it be possible to not notice the pre-call haptic advisement?  The riding can be intense and I don’t want to be calling 911 on accident!

    That would be a possibility.   Not only could the rough ride trigger a false fall detection, but the juggling might obscure the haptic feedback of the notification (it's not very loud -- it's mostly the vibration).   But, actually, I'm not sure about the false fall detection:  your hands on the handle bars might stop that -- i get them while playing basketball or touch football with sudden movements.

    But, you can turn fall detection off and enjoy all the other benefits of the watch -- like being able to call for help if needed.

    Yeah, my plan has always been to stay conscious long enough to manually send for help from my watch—that or wreck somewhere heavily trafficked!  Automatic fall detection would be ideal, though, if I could count on it…
  • Reply 9 of 11
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    bageljoey said:
    bageljoey said:
    I often go mountain biking on my own. I’ve been thinking I should enable the fall detection but I’m worried that I would trip the warning.  
    Would it be possible to not notice the pre-call haptic advisement?  The riding can be intense and I don’t want to be calling 911 on accident!

    That would be a possibility.   Not only could the rough ride trigger a false fall detection, but the juggling might obscure the haptic feedback of the notification (it's not very loud -- it's mostly the vibration).   But, actually, I'm not sure about the false fall detection:  your hands on the handle bars might stop that -- i get them while playing basketball or touch football with sudden movements.

    But, you can turn fall detection off and enjoy all the other benefits of the watch -- like being able to call for help if needed.

    Yeah, my plan has always been to stay conscious long enough to manually send for help from my watch

    That's not a plan. You know that, right?
    MacProscstrrf
  • Reply 10 of 11
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    Rayz2016 said:
    bageljoey said:
    bageljoey said:
    I often go mountain biking on my own. I’ve been thinking I should enable the fall detection but I’m worried that I would trip the warning.  
    Would it be possible to not notice the pre-call haptic advisement?  The riding can be intense and I don’t want to be calling 911 on accident!

    That would be a possibility.   Not only could the rough ride trigger a false fall detection, but the juggling might obscure the haptic feedback of the notification (it's not very loud -- it's mostly the vibration).   But, actually, I'm not sure about the false fall detection:  your hands on the handle bars might stop that -- i get them while playing basketball or touch football with sudden movements.

    But, you can turn fall detection off and enjoy all the other benefits of the watch -- like being able to call for help if needed.

    Yeah, my plan has always been to stay conscious long enough to manually send for help from my watch

    That's not a plan. You know that, right?

    I think he knows it needs a little work.
  • Reply 11 of 11
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,523member
    MacPro said:
    You just never know.
    Also, this is a selling point for the LTE function:  the watch doesn't have to be near your phone to call.
    Agreed. That's exactly why I bought my wife the LTE Watch, she cycles, and runs and this is an essential safety device IMHO as well as a mobile wrist phone.

    If she runs, Airpod Pros are a great compliment to the watch:   You don't have a phone bouncing around, the Airpod pros not only have great sound but transperency mode to help you hear what's going on around you.

    The other day I was out for a run and decided to stop at a new ice cream shop (a rare treat for me!).  As usual I had no cash or cards on me, so I paid for the ice cream using ApplePay on from my watch.
    Real ice cream is an excellent nutrient for runners  This is a good article for self-convincing ;).  https://littlethings.com/lifestyle/ice-cream-health-benefits

    She does have Airpod but not pros yet, but her birthday approaches :)

    scstrrfGeorgeBMac
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