Arab world's perception of US: they seek a unified front, didn't we see this coming?

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
Here is a list of current headlines throughout Arab countries

they are calling for UNITY in the face of the Aggression from the Invader:



LINK



with such gems as this:
Quote:

Should the wrongdoers and the oppressive and unjust forces win the war it will only be a fleeting win. The evil axis and the evil forces will not gain their main political objective from the war.



Al-Akhbar - Egypt



and this:
Quote:

Arabs are currently facing the greatest danger and are facing a belligerent invasion campaign which is threatening their existence. They need to unite and iron out their differences.

Al-Thawrah - Syria





I hope that these are merely cranks and I hope that I am destined to be wrong about my position and the fears that I forsaw before the war and am seeing actualized now . . . hopefully I am just seeing things . .
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 21
    groveratgroverat Posts: 10,872member
    Post it twice, twice as nice!



    Arab nations aren't happy with us!? WHAT A SHOCKER!



    Because they were so happy about the Gulf War.



    Selective memory... ON!
  • Reply 2 of 21
    haraldharald Posts: 2,152member
    Ah yes. In my selective memory, Gulf War 1 was supported by Iran, Turkey, Syria, Kuwait (surprise surprise) and Saudia Arabia.



    That is, all the countries bordering on Iraq.



    Who's being selective, considering even Kuwait was making noises against this war until it all kicked off. All the rest still are.



    Remember?
  • Reply 3 of 21
    groveratgroverat Posts: 10,872member
    What did the other Arab nations think about Gulf War 1.0?



    I don't give a crap what the Arab world thinks about what we do, I only care that we do what we think is right. There's a difference in thinking.



    I like how you guys exaggerate the opposition, it's cute.
  • Reply 4 of 21
    tulkastulkas Posts: 3,756member
    Does they selective memory extend to forgetting that most of these Arab newspapers carried anti-US headlines and stories before this? Does the selective memory forget that there has been general hatred of the US in the area for decades? (and of crusader Europeans for centuries)



    IKYWBIAOISGA
  • Reply 5 of 21
    groveratgroverat Posts: 10,872member
    No, Tulkas, all Arab nations loved us before Bush took office.



    You see, 9/11 was a love tap.



    The world was a candyland of marshmallows and taffy before Bush took office.



    Everything that is bad now is Bush's fault.
  • Reply 6 of 21
    The key word is exacerbate.
  • Reply 7 of 21
    newnew Posts: 3,244member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by groverat

    I don't give a crap what the Arab world thinks about what we do, I only care that we do what we think is right. There's a difference in thinking.



    You know groove, I really feel like... you know, you've just stoped caring a lot lately? huh?
  • Reply 8 of 21
    groveratgroverat Posts: 10,872member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by New

    You know groove, I really feel like... you know, you've just stoped caring a lot lately? huh?



    When it comes to what others think about us, absolutely.



    Especially people who use Arab anti-US sentiment as evidence that current US policy is wrong or dismiss the 45-member coalition and say "THE WORLD" is against the US.



    Tends to rub you the wrong way. I'm sure it's easy to be mellow and very concerned about the "international community" (oxymoron) when your nation or government isn't even on the world radar.
  • Reply 9 of 21
    newnew Posts: 3,244member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by groverat

    I'm sure it's easy to be mellow and very concerned about the "international community" (oxymoron) when your nation or government isn't even on the world radar.



    Is that a diss or an acknowledgment of success?
  • Reply 10 of 21
    groveratgroverat Posts: 10,872member
    Take it however you want.
  • Reply 11 of 21
    Let's just hope the Arabs take out their anger on the French. That would be the smart think to do, the French are a lot closer to the Middle East and they are less likely to fight back.
  • Reply 12 of 21
    bungebunge Posts: 7,329member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by groverat

    When it comes to what others think about us, absolutely.



    Just a little advice: people who have traveled outside of Texas and/or the United States have a different perspective on world events. These outside views are actually very helpful when someone who has limited experiences is making a decision or voicing an opinion. This is true for people who range from ordinary individual citizens all the way up to the highest ranks of the United States' Government.
  • Reply 13 of 21
    I wonder what the respective %s of Europeans who have been to the US is and vice versa. Would be interesting to see.
  • Reply 14 of 21
    finboyfinboy Posts: 383member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by bunge

    Just a little advice: people who have traveled outside of Texas and/or the United States have a different perspective on world events.



    Some of them obviously have delusions of superiority as well, looking down their noses at those "pedestrians" who've never spent decadent weeks in world travel.
  • Reply 15 of 21
    pfflampfflam Posts: 5,053member
    I for one have travelled alot and lived in foriegn countries (for me that means other than the US) I was an Army brat and somehow never grew out of jumping from place to place

    I will tell you, you might think it snobbish but travel does broaden the mind . . . if I take myself as an example
  • Reply 16 of 21
    Quote:

    I don't give a crap what the Arab world thinks about what we do



    Right. The Arab world is inferior and their social problems do not have any impact on their thinking nor does pushy US actions such as all those wonderful instances you needn't be reminded of because you're so smart and superior.



    Bah, no one said the world was against the US in the sense of entirety as you said it.



    What about not being on international radar? You're setting up a hierarchy of importance, and Arab community is angry at this as much as other things. You're attitude, being a member of the collective, is part of the problem.
  • Reply 17 of 21
    matsumatsu Posts: 6,558member
    Forget about citizens for a second. Let us think in political abstractions for the sake of moral comfort, for now.



    Apart from south east asia, the Arab world is the most corrupt political region the world has seen in quite a long time (and we have watched when it suited us, but I prefer to avoid self-flaggelation, for now).



    A united Arab world? HAHAHA!!! You can be sure that as much as they hate us, they hate each other, and it would take quite a lot of hate to unify them against us in any binding form. They will turn to killing each other as soon as we're gone, just as they have been till now, even now.



    The best thing would be a pax-Americana. But we are not that interested in Imperialism, sadly.
  • Reply 18 of 21
    mrmistermrmister Posts: 1,095member
    I've travelled the world, I'm very well read and I support the overthrow of Saddam Hussein.



    We *do* exist.
  • Reply 19 of 21
    Well its naive to expect that region to cooperate amongst themselves. If they weren't so angry...ahem...which isn't all "ahem"'s fault but anyway, they might be coersed by friends closer by.



    I really have no ideas then.
  • Reply 20 of 21
    Lets not use that word "illness". Humans can beleive anything they like too.





    But I know what you mean and I have to agree with the application to certain people with the traits mentioned. Not all Americans are like that and its with those I share a special and enjoyable arguement.



    When superiortiy gets thrown in, it destroys the actual ethics and logic being argued since the person positing they are superior is using that fact to prove themsleves right to themselves which makes it harder to have an arguement about something.



    Its definately a fallacy, but lines are blurred when the superiority is mixed in with military size, duty, history and other actual issues.
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