Apple rejecting apps is unfair competition, declare rejected app developers

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  • Reply 21 of 39
    elijahg said:
    pwrmac said:
    But an Android! You are not forced by Apple to buy their services or devices.
    Well, you don't have much choice once you've bought far enough into the ecosystem. If I was to switch to Android I'd need to re-buy all my apps, bin the HomePods, bin the Airpods, accessories etc in addition to buying the phone itself.
    You always have a choice. Just because you bought AirPods doesn't mean you have to keep using Apple products. In the end, you still have a choice. It's up to you whether or not you choose to do so. I bought parts for my car that only fit my car, does that mean I have to buy the same car again? No, I can choose to give those parts up with the car, or sell them if they don't work with the new car. 
    baconstangwilliamlondonviclauyycwatto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 39
    davidwdavidw Posts: 1,373member
    elijahg said:
    pwrmac said:
    But an Android! You are not forced by Apple to buy their services or devices.
    Well, you don't have much choice once you've bought far enough into the ecosystem. If I was to switch to Android I'd need to re-buy all my apps, bin the HomePods, bin the Airpods, accessories etc in addition to buying the phone itself.
    The is very small minded thinking. YOU ALWAYS HAVE THE CHOICE TO SWITCH. Apple can not take that choice away from any of their users. Being difficult to switch IS NOT THE SAME as not having much of a choice. That choice is always there and does not go away just because you don't want to spend the money to switch. Not wanting to spend the money to switch is the choice you made, not  the choice Apple made for you.    

    You make it seem as though once an iOS users switch to Android, they have to throw away all their Apple devices. Those devoices still work and can be sold to offset the cost of switching. They can be given away or traded to friends that can use them. Maybe get a free lunch in the exchange. In this respect, it is much easier to switch from iOS to Android, than the other way around because iOS devices hold more of their value and for a lot longer, than Android devices. Plus Android devices are usually cheaper to purchase new.  

    Can you take all the games and custom accessories you bought for a Playstation (over the years) and use them on an Xbox?  Does that mean that gamers that are heavily invested in a Playstation, have NO CHOICE but to buy a Playstation, every time they want to upgrade their consoles?  Should they sue Microsoft because they have a "monopoly" on Halo and the only way to play Halo with a game console, is to buy an Xbox?  That's why serious gamers own both. 

    You know, the last time I checked, you can use an iPhone and and Android phone on the same family phone plan. My brother family plan includes 2 iPhones and 2 Galaxy phones. It doesn't cost any extra to have both iOS and Android phones on the same plan. What's the problem with using both ecosystems? That's a choice ..... right?

    A lot of friends I know have kids playing games on a  game console, that have more invested in games and accessories for their game consoles, the the most iOS users have invested in Apple accessories. You don't hear them crying about how they don't have much choice but to stay with their present game console. Should they sue Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo for making it difficult to switch gaming platforms? Why should Microsoft make an Xbox that can play a Playstation game disc or app?       
    thtwilliamlondondanhDogpersonmuthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 23 of 39
    mattinozmattinoz Posts: 1,684member
    Could not 90% of these app developers deliver the product to market as a web app?

    so they could get together and make a store for web apps that creates its own customer trust to trade off. They don’t even need a full OS just leverage the standards work done by Apple and Google in their OS. 

    Still 14 years this has been possible Apple and Google have contributed to it being a better option everyone of those years. If someone has tried it they either didn’t promote very well or lost consumer trust they early. 

    Still it is there and is a avenue for 3rd party store an apps. 
    baconstangwilliamlondondanhwatto_cobra
  • Reply 24 of 39
    As an iPhone user, explain why I should not be able to use my iPhone to mine cryptocurrency if I really want to. The GPU on the iPhone 13 Pro Max is pretty beefy. It should be able to mine a little bit at least. Seriously, how dare Apple tell me what I can and cannot do with any computer I own, even my iPhone?
    I can't tell if you are being sarcastic or serious. For those who don't know, Google, like Apple also bans cryptocurrency mining apps because they can do permanent physical damage to the smart phone.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 25 of 39
    A modest proposal: An official way to jail break iOS devices. If you do it, you can install and run any software you want but you lose some things. Among these is access to iCloud and the official App Store. You get most of the built in Apple apps. You can still check stock prices and the weather but you can't save any information on iCloud. This would make older iOS devices a lot more useful rather than languishing in a draw somewhere. Think of it as a form of recycling.
    I've been arguing for years that if Apple allowed Android on iPhones then this would get regulators off Apple's back who are claiming that Apple doesn't allow third party app stores and whatever else Android supports that iOS doesn't. Since under 1% of iPhone users would install Android it would essentially prove that users are happy with the iOS "restrictions." And don't forget the precedent that Apple allows replacement OS's on Macs, and that doesn't hurt Apple either. So Apple would win a lot of goodwill if it allowed Android on iPhones.
    nadriel
  • Reply 26 of 39
    danoxdanox Posts: 676member
    All the large sized app development companies should just create a consortium and develop their own app store using some open version of Android. It will take a long time but they can put the premium versions of their apps on that store and the non premium versions on the Apple and Google stores. Slowly transition away from their reliance on Apple and Google.
    Please I hope they do, and it will fail hard…..
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 27 of 39
    danoxdanox Posts: 676member
    mattinoz said:
    Could not 90% of these app developers deliver the product to market as a web app?

    so they could get together and make a store for web apps that creates its own customer trust to trade off. They don’t even need a full OS just leverage the standards work done by Apple and Google in their OS. 

    Still 14 years this has been possible Apple and Google have contributed to it being a better option everyone of those years. If someone has tried it they either didn’t promote very well or lost consumer trust they early. 

    Still it is there and is a avenue for 3rd party store an apps. 
    Google sucks that is why they are giving Apple 15 billion dollars per year for access.
    Dogpersonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 28 of 39
    Walmart won't carry my shirt, they are ANIT COMPETITIVE!  Ford won't use my break pads! They are a MONOPOLY! And X-Box won't play Playstation games! UNFAIR! They don't seem to understand the words they use. What they want is - everything their way. It's not their store. I keep asking The Gap to carry my pants, but they refuse too. 
    Break pads? Huh?
  • Reply 29 of 39
    rhbellmor said:
    Like my wife always tells me when I complain about some design feature or lack of in my new car, she tells me to design my own car.  The developers are free to design their own smartphone and App Store like I can start my own car company.  I like Apple protecting me and my smartphone.  When Apple stops doing that I’ll go back to a dumb flip phone!
    That’s what Homer Simpson did.
    That is his half-brother’s car company. All I can say is it don’t end well. 

    Seriously, small scale project might work but as sophisticated as iOS or android,
    people need to pour shit load of money into it. Even as rich as MS can’t make it work. 

    Just security alone is enough headaches, company as rich and resourceful as apple and google still can’t patch every hole. 
  • Reply 30 of 39
    elijahg said:
    pwrmac said:
    But an Android! You are not forced by Apple to buy their services or devices.
    Well, you don't have much choice once you've bought far enough into the ecosystem. If I was to switch to Android I'd need to re-buy all my apps, bin the HomePods, bin the Airpods, accessories etc in addition to buying the phone itself.
    You can always asked these generous and friendly app developers to give you their app access in android. I am sure they will not be so greedy that double dip you. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 31 of 39
    As an iPhone user, explain why I should not be able to use my iPhone to mine cryptocurrency if I really want to. The GPU on the iPhone 13 Pro Max is pretty beefy. It should be able to mine a little bit at least. Seriously, how dare Apple tell me what I can and cannot do with any computer I own, even my iPhone?
    When Apple introduced the App Store they reviewed the apps and rejected some of them. They have now been doing this for over 10 years. If you object to Apple making those decisions over apps on their platform then you should have taken your money elsewhere right from the start. Caveat Emptor. 
    danhwilliamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 32 of 39
    I'm am not complaining as an Apple shareholder :-) They are doing a great job.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 33 of 39
    crowleycrowley Posts: 9,093member
    As an iPhone user, explain why I should not be able to use my iPhone to mine cryptocurrency if I really want to. The GPU on the iPhone 13 Pro Max is pretty beefy. It should be able to mine a little bit at least. Seriously, how dare Apple tell me what I can and cannot do with any computer I own, even my iPhone?
    Dude, if you want to get people on your side, crypto mining as a use case sure isn't the way.  Crypto miners can all drop dead.
    Dogpersonmuthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 34 of 39
    You know what isn’t fair? Apps that spy on you, steal from you, or that are so buggy it’s annoying. 

    Rejecting apps is a great thing. If not for that, we wouldn’t have the bounty of amazing quality apps we have now. Due to rejecting apps, we have an expectation that thing are going to just work - with few exceptions. 

    Rejecting bad apps is fair and right. The only time it isn’t is when there are no explanations snd no recourse. 

    Get your apps right, and voila! No problemo. 
    williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 35 of 39
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,827member
    As an iPhone user, explain why I should not be able to use my iPhone to mine cryptocurrency if I really want to. The GPU on the iPhone 13 Pro Max is pretty beefy. It should be able to mine a little bit at least. Seriously, how dare Apple tell me what I can and cannot do with any computer I own, even my iPhone?
    Get a developer account, compile & run whatever software you want for your use. Why should you dictate what Apple distributes on its store/platform?
    Why have so many of us become defiant little brats when we don’t get our own way? Was pseudo-consultative government a good idea upon reflection? Or are the ‘artefacts’
    muthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 36 of 39
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,827member
    Apple needs to front-foot this. Until now they’ve been too subtle, time for an App Store ‘purge’.  

    1) The App Store has become bloated with software which isn’t real iOS software as it doesn’t use iOS 1st-party frameworks, doesn’t look or feel like an iOS app as determined by Apple HIG, doesn’t efficiently use the hardware (impacting performance & battery life). We even have fake-natives; precompiled JavaScript apps built with the likes of React. These apps should be banned outright or labelled with warnings on the store.
    2) A Trojan Horse used to be a class of malware, now creating apps which appear to do one thing but actually do another (data capture) is a fundamental design pattern. Apple shouldn’t just pull these Apps, they should trigger legal proceedings for fraudulent misrepresentation.
    Apple used to be about quality but the App Store is anything but.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 37 of 39
    lkrupp said:

    So instead you’ll just stay and continue to bitch, whine, complain, rage, and express your desire for the government to take Apple down so you can do what you want to on a platform that you despise. Yeah, right, that’s logical.
    Oh, I dunno.

    I'm becoming a connoisseur of fine whines.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 38 of 39
    As an iPhone user, explain why I should not be able to use my iPhone to mine cryptocurrency if I really want to. The GPU on the iPhone 13 Pro Max is pretty beefy. It should be able to mine a little bit at least. Seriously, how dare Apple tell me what I can and cannot do with any computer I own, even my iPhone?
    Remember when your first turned on your iPhone and you were presented the Terms & Conditions? Yeah, that point where you can’t progress past and are given the opportunity to return your product if you didn’t agree? That was the point that you could have swapped to a different device that suited your needs.

    Yeah, I’m guessing you agreed to the terms though.

    If you read it, you would see that you do indeed own the hardware, that isn’t in dispute. However, iOS is licensed to you and you agreed to use that software how Apple set forth. Now, you are free to put whatever OS on there that you want, and then use your device in any way that you want, but Apple isn’t obligated to make it easy for you.

    As everybody on the interwebs loves analogies….you wouldn’t buy a sports car and complain that you can’t carry a 1T load in the bed - especially if the sales person explained that you couldn’t do it at the point of sale, and a pickup would likely suit your needs.


    But to answer your specific question; if you want to mine crypto, you can apply for a developer account (which is free if you don’t intend to distribute on the App Store). Download XCode and you can write and run whatever code you like locally on your own device. Mine away instead of whine away.
    edited September 26 williamlondonmuthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobramcdave
  • Reply 39 of 39
    As an iPhone user, explain why I should not be able to use my iPhone to mine cryptocurrency if I really want to. The GPU on the iPhone 13 Pro Max is pretty beefy. It should be able to mine a little bit at least. Seriously, how dare Apple tell me what I can and cannot do with any computer I own, even my iPhone?
    Remember when your first turned on your iPhone and you were presented the Terms & Conditions? Yeah, that point where you can’t progress past and are given the opportunity to return your product if you didn’t agree? That was the point that you could have swapped to a different device that suited your needs.

    Yeah, I’m guessing you agreed to the terms though.

    If you read it, you would see that you do indeed own the hardware, that isn’t in dispute. However, iOS is licensed to you and you agreed to use that software how Apple set forth. Now, you are free to put whatever OS on there that you want, and then use your device in any way that you want, but Apple isn’t obligated to make it easy for you.

    As everybody on the interwebs loves analogies….you wouldn’t buy a sports car and complain that you can’t carry a 1T load in the bed - especially if the sales person explained that you couldn’t do it at the point of sale, and a pickup would likely suit your needs.


    But to answer your specific question; if you want to mine crypto, you can apply for a developer account (which is free if you don’t intend to distribute on the App Store). Download XCode and you can write and run whatever code you like locally on your own device. Mine away instead of whine away.
    I enjoyed your post, especially the last paragraph which I didn't realize was true.
    watto_cobra
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