Apple tells developers how to use 120Hz ProMotion for iPhone 13 Pro

Posted:
in iPhone
Apple has updated its developer documentation about ProMotion, explaining to developers how to understand and properly use the variable refresh rates feature in the iPhone 13 Pro models.




On Friday, it was found that developers weren't able to fully take advantage of ProMotion, Apple's variable refresh rate feature that can change the display's updates from the typical 60Hz to a maximum of 120Hz. Hours after Apple acknowledged that developers can take advantage of the feature, it has also taken steps to educate developers on how to properly use ProMotion.

In an update to the Core Animation framework developer documentation on Apple's website, there's a new page titled "Optimizing ProMotion Refresh Rates for iPhone 13 Pro and iPad Pro."

The page explains that developers can set animations to work at higher or lower refresh rates, and how to do it. While some framework animation features can handle frame pacing for developers, such as UIKit and SpriteKit, developers can take advantage of CADisplayLink to specify the timing for an animation.

As part of the documentation, it also confirms there is a greater array of refresh rates available o the iPhone 13 Pro and Pro Max, compared to the iPad Pro.

The iPad Pro can present content at 120Hz, 60Hz, 40Hz, 30Hz, and 24Hz. Meanwhile, the iPhone 13 Pro pair can also use 80Hz, 48Hz, 20Hz, 16Hz, 15Hz, 12Hz, and 10Hz at the lowest.

Apple recommends that small animations with fewer updates could use lower frame rates to save power, while high-impact animations such as gaming could take advantage of the higher refresh rates.

Apple confirmed the automatic handling of refresh rates late on Friday, as part of its clarification following developer reports of animation issues earlier in the day. At the same time, it confirmed that there was an issue with animations made using Core Animations, and that a fix is on the way, but for the moment some animations may be limited to 60Hz.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 9
    I love the rush to judgment these days. “Apple won’t let us use ProMotion like they do”. No, it was a bug. When did developing become whining?
    williamlondonomar moralesmobirdStrangeDaysgregoriusmnapoleon_phoneapartMisterKitmike1caladanianlkrupp
  • Reply 2 of 9
    I don’t own a ProMotion device as of yet, but I’m sure it would be fun to make sample code to compare the behaviour and real impact of different animation speeds. I’m fully aware that some people don’t care about higher refresh rates than 60 Hz, but personally it’s not about the different Hertz numbers — I just want the smoothest possible experience. The screen is the thing you stare at, more than anything else, after all. Maybe it’s just me, but that’s how a device feels fast to me.
    gregoriusm
  • Reply 3 of 9
    I thought WWDC was where these issues were discussed and where developers planned for the new iOS.
  • Reply 4 of 9
    Not everyone developing attends and those that do aren’t required to pay attention….

    fun times. 
    FileMakerFeller
  • Reply 5 of 9
    But but but what about the prior conspiracy? You mean…it was just a mistake?
    williamlondonFileMakerFeller
  • Reply 6 of 9
    danoxdanox Posts: 636member
    Never mind….
  • Reply 7 of 9
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 5,775member
    sbdude said:
    I love the rush to judgment these days. “Apple won’t let us use ProMotion like they do”. No, it was a bug. When did developing become whining?
    Many "developers" nowadays are just whiny, wannabe weekend coders that could barely code their way out of a "hello program".  To real coders, those that know - and appreciate - the science behind their craft it's a non-issue.

    Lazy developers.  That's all they are.
    mike1williamlondonFileMakerFeller
  • Reply 8 of 9
    sflocal said:
    sbdude said:
    I love the rush to judgment these days. “Apple won’t let us use ProMotion like they do”. No, it was a bug. When did developing become whining?
    Many "developers" nowadays are just whiny, wannabe weekend coders that could barely code their way out of a "hello program".  To real coders, those that know - and appreciate - the science behind their craft it's a non-issue.

    Lazy developers.  That's all they are.
    I think it’s about assuming the worst instead of being rational about it. The recent developer uprising lately probably keep some people on edge.
    caladanian
  • Reply 9 of 9
    iOS_Guy80 said:
    I thought WWDC was where these issues were discussed and where developers planned for the new iOS.
    At that time, there was no iPhone with that feature.
    MacsWithPenguins
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