DxOMark says iPhone 13 Pro has a great camera with 'outstanding video'

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in iPhone
Apple's iPhone 13 Pro has scored highly in DxOMark testing, ranking fourth among all smartphones thanks to its general camera improvement and "outstanding video."

Credit: Apple
Credit: Apple


The camera testing firm gave the latest flagship model a score of 137, which is lower than the Huawei P50 Pro's 144, the Xiaomo Mi 11 Ultra's 143, and the Huawei's 40 Pro+'s 139. However, the iPhone 13 Pro is currently the highest-ranked iPhone model in DxOMark's list.

DxOMark said that the camera features accurate color rendering, good detail in indoor and outdoor settings, and an overall reliable experience. However, photo performance appeared to be about the same as the previous generation.

"Overall Photo performance is quite similar to the 12 Pro we tested last year but improvements have been made in several areas," the site wrote.

On the other hand, DxOMark says that the iPhone 13 Pro's camera is outstanding for video. The device received a video score of 119, putting it at the very top of the DxOMark sub-ranking. The site attributes that to "several improvements in key areas."

For example, Apple has improved tone mapping, stabilized exposure, and enhanced its autofocus performance. The iPhone 13 Pro managed to beat out several other contenders that had larger sensors and higher resolution.

All in all, the iPhone 13 Pro earned top marks across a variety of categories in DxOMark's testing. The full analysis is available here.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    I'm always a little surprised that Apple isn't more dominant on this ranking, given how Apple's custom silicon dominates in many areas. 

    I never use Android phones, so I don't have first hand experience. But I'm wondering if iPhones have an advantage in something not captured by this particular group's reviews? For example, is the iPhone faster at processing a photo once snapped? 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 11
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,089member
    I never pay any attention to what DXOMark says about anything. Nobody in the photos industry does.
    AniMill12Strangerstechconcwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 3 of 11
    I have the 13 Pro and I’m ranking it #1.
    AniMillnapoleon_phoneapartwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 4 of 11
    melgross said:
    I never pay any attention to what DXOMark says about anything. Nobody in the photos industry does.
    So basically they’re the JD Powers of cell cameras? Yeah, that’s about right. 👍
    watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 5 of 11
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 5,933member
    blastdoor said:
    I'm always a little surprised that Apple isn't more dominant on this ranking, given how Apple's custom silicon dominates in many areas. 

    I never use Android phones, so I don't have first hand experience. But I'm wondering if iPhones have an advantage in something not captured by this particular group's reviews? For example, is the iPhone faster at processing a photo once snapped? 
    It's been years since you heard people say they were disappointed by any flagship smartphone camera output for general photography at least. The 'good enough' bar was reached long ago for that. 

    Apple has been behind the competition for a few years in key areas but is catching up. 

    The 'puck' as it were, moved from 'quality' to 'quality + versatility'. iPhones simply weren't offering what top Android phones were offering. iPhones lacked basically all the 'new' features that were popping up on Android phones. When the buzz was around 'Night Mode', tri cameras, periscope lenses, AIIS etc, Apple was not offering the same.

    DX0 actually held off reviewing the first iPhone with Deep Fusion until the software update was released to give it a full review in the best possible conditions.

    There are times when that versatility comes in handy.

    On the other hand video options have been class leading on iPhones although, once again, the 'good enough' bar for that was also reached long ago, too. 
    edited September 28
  • Reply 6 of 11
    avon b7 said:
    blastdoor said:
    I'm always a little surprised that Apple isn't more dominant on this ranking, given how Apple's custom silicon dominates in many areas. 

    I never use Android phones, so I don't have first hand experience. But I'm wondering if iPhones have an advantage in something not captured by this particular group's reviews? For example, is the iPhone faster at processing a photo once snapped? 
    Apple has been behind the competition for a few years in key areas but is catching up. 

    The 'puck' as it were, moved from 'quality' to 'quality + versatility'. iPhones simply weren't offering what top Android phones were offering. iPhones lacked basically all the 'new' features that were popping up on Android phones. When the buzz was around 'Night Mode', tri cameras, periscope lenses, AIIS etc, Apple was not offering the same. 
    It amazes me how you routine confuse niche features from dozens of brands, to things most people care about — especially at the sheer scale of the iPhone market. Normals don’t care about periscope lenses, and I doubt they care about tri cameras. Android’s Night Mode sucked because it was a dedicated mode and took a long while to produce. Despite the name iPhone’s version was not modal and just kicked in when needed. 

    You are always impressed by first, while missing the forest from the trees on best. Same as it ever was. 
    melgrosswatto_cobratmayjony0
  • Reply 7 of 11
    Funny thing is that their own application DXO Photolab doesn't even fully support iPhones. Every time there is an update there's usually a thread on their support site with everyone asking about iPhone support.

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 11
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 5,933member
    avon b7 said:
    blastdoor said:
    I'm always a little surprised that Apple isn't more dominant on this ranking, given how Apple's custom silicon dominates in many areas. 

    I never use Android phones, so I don't have first hand experience. But I'm wondering if iPhones have an advantage in something not captured by this particular group's reviews? For example, is the iPhone faster at processing a photo once snapped? 
    Apple has been behind the competition for a few years in key areas but is catching up. 

    The 'puck' as it were, moved from 'quality' to 'quality + versatility'. iPhones simply weren't offering what top Android phones were offering. iPhones lacked basically all the 'new' features that were popping up on Android phones. When the buzz was around 'Night Mode', tri cameras, periscope lenses, AIIS etc, Apple was not offering the same. 
    It amazes me how you routine confuse niche features from dozens of brands, to things most people care about — especially at the sheer scale of the iPhone market. Normals don’t care about periscope lenses, and I doubt they care about tri cameras. Android’s Night Mode sucked because it was a dedicated mode and took a long while to produce. Despite the name iPhone’s version was not modal and just kicked in when needed. 

    You are always impressed by first, while missing the forest from the trees on best. Same as it ever was. 
    Well, frankly I'm amazed you even tried to run that argument by me.

    This isn't about 'normals', it's about those who are opting for top end flagship phones. They want the best available phone for their money and for the last few years, photography has represented a HUGE chunk of the added value of smartphones. To the point that it has consistently been a key element the marketing of ALL brands with decent camera setups. 

    The tri-camera configuration added an entirely new dynamic to smartphone camera versatility. Night mode was a game changer and not only at 'night' but in ALL low light situations, where all brands had suffered. As was the reduction of noise in the output. Something that Apple has been constantly criticised for. The length of time to take a night shot (five or six seconds in some cases) wasn't an issue because it was literally the difference between getting the photo or not getting the photo! Part of the game changing aspect though wasn't only the result itself but that it could achieved HANDHELD (with AIIS). No tripod necessary.

    You say that Apple's mode kicked in only when necessary. What is your point? 

    Apple was actually so late to night mode that the competition was already taking photos in low light - automatically - without having to even activate a dedicated night mode, which is now only used for more difficult scenarios.

    There is no more frustrating a photo than the one you can't take because your device simply doesn't have the capacity to take it or doesn't let you take it. 

    That is what 'normals' care about, too. 

     

    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 9 of 11
    techconctechconc Posts: 179member
    blastdoor said:
    I'm always a little surprised that Apple isn't more dominant on this ranking, given how Apple's custom silicon dominates in many areas. 

    I never use Android phones, so I don't have first hand experience. But I'm wondering if iPhones have an advantage in something not captured by this particular group's reviews? For example, is the iPhone faster at processing a photo once snapped? 
    What most people don't realize is that DxOMark is a "pay to win" source.  They offer consulting services to help "improve your score".  Apple obviously doesn't need or use their services, so they will not take the top spot.  It's that simple.  Even Android based sites rightly call this out.
    https://www.androidauthority.com/dxomark-ranking-troublesome-805633/
    muthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 10 of 11
    netroxnetrox Posts: 1,081member
    I agree with DxOMark's assessment. 

    I do think iPhone photography is simply not up to competition. 

    I do see that iPhone does seem to render more natural looking tones than competitors but it comes with a cost of limited dynamic range. The black skin looks more accurate. The shadows of a white man in highly lit background are accurate and natural. The background however is clipped to just pure white. The competitors have much wider dynamic range but it looks unnatural which signals that it's not able to apply the natural compression of wide dynamic range like a human eye. 

    It's time for iPhone to take the ridiculously high MP sensors and use binning technology to produce more dynamic range. The problem is that it needs to have a processor that's highly optimized for ultra high resolution sensors for power efficiency and speed. 

  • Reply 11 of 11
    netroxnetrox Posts: 1,081member
    Also, I am tired of people defending their choice of purchase only to be told that their purchase is not up to competition or quality as reviewed by DxOMark. DxOMark is pretty a useful benchmarking site and I rely on it to make decisions if I am concerned about image quality and its capabilities. I also read DPReviews too. They are both excellent review websites on cameras. 

    Face it, iPhone is simply not up to competition in photography anymore. It's been lagging behind for a while. 




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