Apple dismisses iPad mini 'jelly scroll' issue as normal behavior

Posted:
in iPad
Apple has issued a response to accusations there's a glitch with the sixth-generation iPad mini, claiming that the slight out-of-sync "jelly scroll" effect of the display is to be expected.




Apple's hotly-awaited iPad mini update featured a brand new display, one that appeared to havea "jelly" effect when users scrolled in a specific way. Following reports on Sunday about the phenomenon, Apple has responded to the complaints by basically saying everything is fine.

In a response to a query by Ars Technica, Apple said the "jelly scroll" is a normal behavior for LCD screens, due to the way they function.

As the panels update on a line-by-line basis, there is a small delay between lines updating at the top of the screen and the bottom being refreshed. This delay can apparently result in uneven scrolling, such as the one observed in the iPad mini.

The version observed in the iPad mini generally manifests when the tablet is held in a portrait orientation, though it can also apparently occur in landscape too, depending on the unit. Fast scrolling through a webpage, with a lot of text, for example, can result in the effect appearing on occasion.

AppleInsider has been able to recreate the effect on the iPad mini, and has also observed it in the 12.9-inch iPad Pro with ProMotion in testing, but the effect is more subtle.

However, the problem is rarely noticeable, meaning most users won't necessarily observe it without looking specifically for the issue.

Even so, it is likely to be a problem that Apple will be investigating despite its claim, as while its explanation should theoretically apply to pretty much any LCD-based iPad it has released in recent years, it's only becoming a widely-discussed problem now.

Read on AppleInsider
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 22
    So basically this is another NothingBurger that people were hoping to turn into a #<issue>Gate moment to smear Apple, check...

    Nothing to see here folks, put your OCD into your back pocket and move along.
    scott6666lkrupptht12StrangersronnrepressthisMplsP
  • Reply 2 of 22
    So basically this is another NothingBurger that people were hoping to turn into a #<issue>Gate moment to smear Apple, check...

    Nothing to see here folks, put your OCD into your back pocket and move along.
    Better than: you’re scrolling it wrong 
    williamlondonnetroxdarkvaderdowhilest
  • Reply 3 of 22
    I have been using mine since Friday and have not noticed any issues 
    williamlondonJapheyronnrepressthis
  • Reply 4 of 22
    "It's not a Bug... it's a Featu------- Oh, nevermind!"
    williamlondonbala1234darkvaderdowhilest
  • Reply 5 of 22
    Queue up the lawsuits
    lkrupp
  • Reply 6 of 22
    So basically this is another NothingBurger that people were hoping to turn into a #<issue>Gate moment to smear Apple, check...

    Nothing to see here folks, put your OCD into your back pocket and move along.

    It's not hard to discern the different slants sites and their writers (note--I don't call them journalists, that profession is dead) have in their Apple coverage.

    This is just more of the same, and hardly surprising.

    magman1979ronnrepressthisthtlkrupp
  • Reply 7 of 22
    dewmedewme Posts: 3,890member
    I need to see a realtime video of this in action, not slow motion. I’d bet that if you filmed just about any screen in slow motion you’re going to see all kinds of subtle display artifacts related to the hardware, software, and nature of the displayed content. Things like interlacing, refresh rates, video frame buffers, performance of the LCD panel itself, on the hardware side and data retrieval and rendering algorithms in the GPU and software. Though probably not a problem in this case, you also have to cautious of running into aliasing effects between the source and the recording device. 

    It all comes down to how the end-to-end video processing stack works with the human eyes and brain. Does the net effect result in something that is pleasant to use and fits the task at hand? The evolution of computer display technology has shown us that different people react differently to the exact same video presentation. It would be one thing if we were talking about uncomfortable display artifacts that occurred at all times when using the display, e.g., low refresh rate causing flickering or leading to eye strain and headaches. But here we are talking about a nearly indiscernible artifact occurring during scrolling, when the user is probably not focused on trying to consume the detailed content of the scrolling display.

    I haven’t seen the artifact yet, but I’l assuming it cannot be worse than scrolling a web page or PDF that has embedded graphics or video (web page) that doesn’t render in perfect synchronicity with the textual content on the page. It may take a few milliseconds or longer for everything to finish rendering once the scrolling stops and the user actually focuses on the aggregated content. Smoother scrolling is more aesthetically pleasing, and probably a necessity on something like a teleprompter, but I’m not losing any sleep over the many little display artifacts that we’ve been living with since the days of CRTs. Things have gotten so much better but are not yet perfect.
    tht
  • Reply 8 of 22
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,252member
    dewme said:
    I need to see a realtime video of this in action, not slow motion. I’d bet that if you filmed just about any screen in slow motion you’re going to see all kinds of subtle display artifacts related to the hardware, software, and nature of the displayed content.


    It doesn't look like something that would bother me, YMMV.  Now the potentially cramped UI might take some getting used to, but I'm not the target market for the Mini anyway. I prefer larger displays if I have physical interaction with one. That's not to say I don't find benefits with small (non-camera) display's in the kitchen for recipes or watching the news while cooking breakfast, or next to my desk for Youtube training video references. Those are static and controlled by voice. And relatively cheap. 

    Now a larger Air might be OK for my wife. 
    edited September 29
  • Reply 9 of 22
    gatorguy said:
    dewme said:
    I need to see a realtime video of this in action, not slow motion. I’d bet that if you filmed just about any screen in slow motion you’re going to see all kinds of subtle display artifacts related to the hardware, software, and nature of the displayed content.


    It doesn't look like something that would bother me, YMMV.  Now the potentially cramped UI might take some getting used to, but I'm not the target market for the Mini anyway. I prefer larger displays if I have physical interaction with one. That's not to say I don't find benefits with small (non-camera) display's in the kitchen for recipes or watching the news while cooking breakfast, or next to my desk for Youtube training video references. Those are static and controlled by voice. And relatively cheap. 

    Now a larger Air might be OK for my wife. 
    If that's the best example of a "realtime video in action" which demonstrates the problem, then there isn't a problem.  I've never noticed this on any of my LCD displays.  I don't see it on my 11" iPad Pro for example.  Even in this video, the only time you can see it is when you do super slow motion.  I was unable to see an issue when he scrolled in real time. 
    thtwilliamlondon
  • Reply 10 of 22
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,252member
    techconc said:
    gatorguy said:
    dewme said:
    I need to see a realtime video of this in action, not slow motion. I’d bet that if you filmed just about any screen in slow motion you’re going to see all kinds of subtle display artifacts related to the hardware, software, and nature of the displayed content.


    It doesn't look like something that would bother me, YMMV.  Now the potentially cramped UI might take some getting used to, but I'm not the target market for the Mini anyway. I prefer larger displays if I have physical interaction with one. That's not to say I don't find benefits with small (non-camera) display's in the kitchen for recipes or watching the news while cooking breakfast, or next to my desk for Youtube training video references. Those are static and controlled by voice. And relatively cheap. 

    Now a larger Air might be OK for my wife. 
    If that's the best example of a "realtime video in action" which demonstrates the problem, then there isn't a problem.  I've never noticed this on any of my LCD displays.  I don't see it on my 11" iPad Pro for example.  Even in this video, the only time you can see it is when you do super slow motion.  I was unable to see an issue when he scrolled in real time. 
    You and I agree. 
    techconc
  • Reply 11 of 22
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,555member
    Doesn’t matter what’s going on, the tech blogs will take this and run with it. "Apple says it’s normal? Oh yeah, we’ll pound away at this until we stir up enough shit to create a scroll-gate”. We’ll show you, Apple."
    williamlondon
  • Reply 12 of 22
    dewmedewme Posts: 3,890member
    gatorguy said:
    techconc said:
    gatorguy said:
    dewme said:
    I need to see a realtime video of this in action, not slow motion. I’d bet that if you filmed just about any screen in slow motion you’re going to see all kinds of subtle display artifacts related to the hardware, software, and nature of the displayed content.


    It doesn't look like something that would bother me, YMMV.  Now the potentially cramped UI might take some getting used to, but I'm not the target market for the Mini anyway. I prefer larger displays if I have physical interaction with one. That's not to say I don't find benefits with small (non-camera) display's in the kitchen for recipes or watching the news while cooking breakfast, or next to my desk for Youtube training video references. Those are static and controlled by voice. And relatively cheap. 

    Now a larger Air might be OK for my wife. 
    If that's the best example of a "realtime video in action" which demonstrates the problem, then there isn't a problem.  I've never noticed this on any of my LCD displays.  I don't see it on my 11" iPad Pro for example.  Even in this video, the only time you can see it is when you do super slow motion.  I was unable to see an issue when he scrolled in real time. 
    You and I agree. 
    +1 on the agree-o-meter.
    edited September 29
  • Reply 13 of 22
    Don’t see the issue here. 

    Screens have weird refreshes. Not always. But often. 

    But the with the mini, you literally cannot even see it. 

    You have to do a witch hunt for it. Wonder if Samsung lit this fire. They know enough about screens to know how to create the illusion of a “problem.” 
  • Reply 14 of 22
    darkvader said:
    So basically this is another NothingBurger that people were hoping to turn into a #<issue>Gate moment to smear Apple, check...

    Nothing to see here folks, put your OCD into your back pocket and move along.

    Kinda what we expect around here, fanbois gonna fanboi.

    It doesn't really matter to me, outside of a few very specific use cases the iPad is a toy, has always been a toy, and will always be a toy until Apple is finally forced to open up app installation from any source that the device owner wants to use.

    It's not a computer.  It's not a computer replacement.  It's a very expensive toy.
    Says you. I’ve used the iPad as a professional device in every sense of the term. 
  • Reply 15 of 22
    Isn't this the same that results from having a rolling shutter? The screen refreshes in "waves" from one side to another doing one row at a time, for example when taking a video (or a photo) of a helicopter the propeller (or a fan, anything moving fast enough) is misshapen.
    edited September 30
  • Reply 16 of 22
    Not buying an iPad with jelly scroll is also normal behavior as is returning one for a refund.
    dowhilest
  • Reply 17 of 22
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,356member
    Ok - so you have a high resolution screen that can’t quite refresh faster than the limits of human vision and you end up with a bit of jiggle in certain circumstances. Unless it causes noticeable issues when watching video or is more dramatic than what I’m seeing here I can’t see an issue. Seems like someone needed a story before their deadline. 
    williamlondon
  • Reply 18 of 22
    In the almost-12 year history of the iPad, that has never been 'normal behaviour' - nor has it been normal behaviour in any other device.

    I have no doubt Apple will have a fix, given enough time. It's really inexcusable - the nauseating Apple foamers don't have to defend them, yet they are, and no doubt they'll be full of renewed praise once there's a fix and say it was Apple's plan all along etc.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 19 of 22
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 2,569member
    If it works as design than what is the issue ? Not sure what Apple can do with available hardware and software that physics point of view acts the way it is..
    dewmewilliamlondon
  • Reply 20 of 22
    nicholfdnicholfd Posts: 664member
    Key words at the end of the article, "it's only becoming a widely-discussed problem now."

    Right - it's been on other LCD screens/iPads, but no one thought to post info about it online.  Online is a megaphone for those that want to be heard, even for non-issues.

    I personally recall noticing this type of behavior on some of the earlier iPads I owned (original iPad Air, I think?). I only caught/noticed it when I was moving my head sideways while scrolling.  I also notice LED taillights that pulse/flicker.  For the taillights, the LEDs are drive by PWM (pulse width modulation) - power is turned on/of VERY quickly to control brightness.  Length of time on vs. off determines the brightness.  They are rarely (if ever) 100% on, even at the brightest you see.  I also only notice this with side to side movement of my head.
    edited October 3 williamlondon
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