Apple's Australian customers get 7 days of AppleCare+ for free

Posted:
in General Discussion edited October 8
Apple this month enacted a new warranty policy in Australia that nets customers a short period of gratis AppleCare+ service with most major hardware purchases.

AppleCare+


As of Oct. 5, Australian customers purchasing iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, Mac, Apple TV, AirPods, HomePod, iPod touch and other eligible Apple devices receive a seven-day complimentary AppleCare+ plan that affords all the trappings of a full subscription.

According to Apple's terms and conditions, the free AppleCare+ service covers two incidents of accidental damage within the seven-day period, with each claim subject to the usual service fees. Also included is express replacement service, priority access to telephone or web-based technical support and battery service.

The complimentary plans does not renew automatically and users need to purchase AppleCare+, either through a subscription or fixed-term agreement, to continue service when the seven-day term expires. Purchases are processed on-device in the Settings menu, online, at an Apple Store or by phone.

Theft and loss are not covered under the free plan, though users can upgrade to the more expensive option once the week is up.

9to5Mac spotted the change earlier today.

It is unclear why Apple is including a week of AppleCare+ with new purchases, as the plan is of limited benefit to most customers. Enhanced coverage is typically not required until later in the product's lifetime and other services, like technical support, are already offered under Apple's standard warranty.

The decision could be a result of Australia's strict consumer regulations. The country has tangled with Apple in the past over its business practices and is currently mulling action to more closely monitor and manage Apple Pay and the App Store.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 13
    There also doesn’t seem to be a way to pre-purchase 2 year applecare with the device now.  I’ve been looking at making a purchase online and I see this as a big headache - I have to go in store to buy AppleCare on the same receipt as the device.   I don’t think this has anything at all to do with the ACCC, I think it’s a push away from AppleCare being a one off purchase and towards it being always a subscription.  
    luke hamblywatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 13
    jace88jace88 Posts: 28member
    It’s due to recent changes to Australian consumer law around the sale of additional warranties. Basically can’t be done until four days after the purchase. Apple basically confirms this is the rationale in their email to customers after making a purchase of an applicable device eg iPad mini. 


    russwdarkvaderentropyswatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 13
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,685member
    arthurba said:
    There also doesn’t seem to be a way to pre-purchase 2 year applecare with the device now.  I’ve been looking at making a purchase online and I see this as a big headache - I have to go in store to buy AppleCare on the same receipt as the device.   I don’t think this has anything at all to do with the ACCC, I think it’s a push away from AppleCare being a one off purchase and towards it being always a subscription.  

    While I generally don't like subscriptions this is a good one.
    Originally AppleCare+ lasted 2 years (3 for the Mac) and stopped -- then you were on your own.

    But a year or two ago they added the option to extend that coverage indefinitely on a month to month basis for as long as you wanted.  While the cost of the month to month coverage and 2 year contract are roughly the same ($199 vs $9.99/mo) , going to a month to month subscription makes a lot of sense.

    If nothing else, it renews automatically until you cancel it.  Whereas, if you didn't remember to sign up for it at the end of the two year contract you were out of luck.
    arthurbawatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 13
    jace88 said:
    It’s due to recent changes to Australian consumer law around the sale of additional warranties. Basically can’t be done until four days after the purchase. Apple basically confirms this is the rationale in their email to customers after making a purchase of an applicable device eg iPad mini. 



    Wow!  That's an amazing win for consumers in Australia!  All 'product protection plans' are scams, and yes that absolutely includes AppleCare.
  • Reply 5 of 13
    barthrhbarthrh Posts: 113member
    darkvader said:
    jace88 said:
    It’s due to recent changes to Australian consumer law around the sale of additional warranties. Basically can’t be done until four days after the purchase. Apple basically confirms this is the rationale in their email to customers after making a purchase of an applicable device eg iPad mini. 



    Wow!  That's an amazing win for consumers in Australia!  All 'product protection plans' are scams, and yes that absolutely includes AppleCare.
    How is it a scam? For anyone who avoided a $600 repair for a $99 deductible, I think they'd disagree. All insurance is a scam until you need it. I've been paying thousands a year in home insurance and have never been robbed or burned down. That doesn't make it a scam. I hope I never see any value in my life insurance.

    Insurance is only a scam when the insurer tries to dodge the claim. Based on commentary from users who filed claims, AppleCare+ pays readily.
    FileMakerFellermuthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 13
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,685member
    darkvader said:
    jace88 said:
    It’s due to recent changes to Australian consumer law around the sale of additional warranties. Basically can’t be done until four days after the purchase. Apple basically confirms this is the rationale in their email to customers after making a purchase of an applicable device eg iPad mini. 



    Wow!  That's an amazing win for consumers in Australia!  All 'product protection plans' are scams, and yes that absolutely includes AppleCare.

    While I generally agree, my experience with AppleCare+ has been VERY MUCH the opposite.
    It has paid off for me time after time after time.  But then, AppleCare+ is much more than a mere extended warranty.  Much more.
    edited October 9 watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 13
    entropysentropys Posts: 3,195member
    Well the new regulation wasn’t targeting AppleCare per se.
    they are myriad of these warranty scams from superstores and electronics sellers. They milk it to increase margins. Apple probably doe too, although it is one heck of a lot cheaper if you smash your screen.

    interestingly, this seven day requirement is used as a “isn't it great Apple will give you AppleCare for the first seven days!” when the saleswoman at the Apple Store is selling you an iPhone, as I discovered today.
    edited October 10 GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 8 of 13
    entropysentropys Posts: 3,195member
    Here is the email about itApple sent me when I bought a 13 pro today:

    You can say no to add-on insurance. 

    To Entropys 

    You can say no to being sold insurance. It is not compulsory.

    Salespeople must wait 4 days before selling you insurance as an 'extra' to your main purchase.

    You can say 'no' to being contacted about AppleCare+ sold by Apple Pty Limited by clicking this link or via either of the contact details below. 

    You can opt-out of being contacted about any insurance as an 'extra' to your main purchase by contacting Apple Pty Limited via the details below.

    If you are unsure, consider your situation and ask yourself:

    • Do I need and understand this insurance? 

      Consider what the policy covers and what it excludes. You may already have other insurance or arrangements that will cover any potential loss or damage.

    • Could I get a better deal somewhere else?

      Consider if another insurance product or company can better meet your needs. You may be able to shop around for a better deal.

    For more information, visit https://Moneysmart.gov.au/add-on-insurance.

    Apple Pty Limited
    I hope I don’t get cold call harassment in four days’ time.
  • Reply 9 of 13
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,685member
    entropys said:
    Here is the email about itApple sent me when I bought a 13 pro today:

    You can say no to add-on insurance. 

    To Entropys 

    You can say no to being sold insurance. It is not compulsory.

    Salespeople must wait 4 days before selling you insurance as an 'extra' to your main purchase.

    You can say 'no' to being contacted about AppleCare+ sold by Apple Pty Limited by clicking this link or via either of the contact details below. 

    You can opt-out of being contacted about any insurance as an 'extra' to your main purchase by contacting Apple Pty Limited via the details below.

    If you are unsure, consider your situation and ask yourself:

    • Do I need and understand this insurance? 

      Consider what the policy covers and what it excludes. You may already have other insurance or arrangements that will cover any potential loss or damage.

    • Could I get a better deal somewhere else?

      Consider if another insurance product or company can better meet your needs. You may be able to shop around for a better deal.

    For more information, visit https://Moneysmart.gov.au/add-on-insurance.

    Apple Pty Limited
    I hope I don’t get cold call harassment in four days’ time.
    It says:
    "Salespeople must wait 4 days before selling you insurance as an 'extra' to your main purchase."

    Ahh!  Now that suggests why Apple is giving the first 7 days free:   My policy is to have AppleCare+ on the item before I even open the box it comes in.  (I'm a clutz and I know what kind of luck I usually have).

    But this suggests I would not be allowed to that -- so Apple would give it to me till I could take out a real policy,

    As an aside:  I consider AppleCare+ to be one of the best features of Apple's products.  


    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 13
    AppleCare+  goes well beyond the territory of the general warranty and does provide real value.
    • On theft/loss it is SIGNIFICANTLY cheaper than the equivalent portable contents insurance
    • the device replacement speed is literally 1-2 days versus months with insurance, they'll also pre-ship you a replacement so you don't have to go without.
    • Glass/Screen repair can be done at your home
    • Battery replacement makes an older device like new, they'll do it for anything under 80% capacity
    That's not to say that everyone will want these things, but for the price being paid Apple's coverage is inexpensive in comparison to the market and exceedingly generous.
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 13
    barthrh said:
    darkvader said:
    jace88 said:
    It’s due to recent changes to Australian consumer law around the sale of additional warranties. Basically can’t be done until four days after the purchase. Apple basically confirms this is the rationale in their email to customers after making a purchase of an applicable device eg iPad mini. 



    Wow!  That's an amazing win for consumers in Australia!  All 'product protection plans' are scams, and yes that absolutely includes AppleCare.
    How is it a scam? For anyone who avoided a $600 repair for a $99 deductible, I think they'd disagree. All insurance is a scam until you need it. I've been paying thousands a year in home insurance and have never been robbed or burned down. That doesn't make it a scam. I hope I never see any value in my life insurance.

    Insurance is only a scam when the insurer tries to dodge the claim. Based on commentary from users who filed claims, AppleCare+ pays readily.
    In Australia (as in many parts of Europe) we have very strong consumer protection laws.  Therefore goods sold here are also generally more expensive than the same product sold somewhere without those strong consumer protection laws (eg: USA).  Here in Oz, the ACCC have gone on record to say that for an expensive computer (anything that Apple sells, including phones, would qualify) - the consumer should receive a complete refund or a quick repair for minimum cost for the first 3 years.  For Apple to honour the local laws, it really should be bundling AppleCare with every product sold. The problem is, their competitors are not, and Apple aint gonna be the only company following the rules.  Whilst these laws are strong, the enforcement is negligible.  That doesn't stop local suppliers charging way more for their products and claiming the price difference is because of these laws, but not actually providing the service.  So yes, it is a total scam.  Here.  But not necessarily a scam elsewhere.   About 20 years ago this came to a head, and the Federal government did a big inquiry and the result of that came a recommenddation: all Australians should purchase any significant item via grey market import (ie: buy in USA  and buy international extended warranty and ship it here yourself) - even with all the added costs, it works out generally about 10% cheaper than buying it in Oz and relying on the 'statutory warranty'.  For me (any many/most other Apple customers), this is a business purchase, and the extra cost of AppleCare is just factored in to the cost of the product.  We wouldn't ever buy an Apple product without AppleCare.  But yes, technically, it's a total rip off, because the law here clearly states they should provide all those same services as part of the product cost (except theft, which until recently hasn't been available with AppleCare in OZ).
    FileMakerFeller
  • Reply 12 of 13
    Australian Consumer Law also includes a "cooling off" period for significant purchases. If memory serves, that period is 7 days.

    Perhaps there is no such thing as coincidence...
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 13
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,685member
    arthurba said:
    barthrh said:
    darkvader said:
    jace88 said:
    It’s due to recent changes to Australian consumer law around the sale of additional warranties. Basically can’t be done until four days after the purchase. Apple basically confirms this is the rationale in their email to customers after making a purchase of an applicable device eg iPad mini. 



    Wow!  That's an amazing win for consumers in Australia!  All 'product protection plans' are scams, and yes that absolutely includes AppleCare.
    How is it a scam? For anyone who avoided a $600 repair for a $99 deductible, I think they'd disagree. All insurance is a scam until you need it. I've been paying thousands a year in home insurance and have never been robbed or burned down. That doesn't make it a scam. I hope I never see any value in my life insurance.

    Insurance is only a scam when the insurer tries to dodge the claim. Based on commentary from users who filed claims, AppleCare+ pays readily.
    In Australia (as in many parts of Europe) we have very strong consumer protection laws.  Therefore goods sold here are also generally more expensive than the same product sold somewhere without those strong consumer protection laws (eg: USA).  Here in Oz, the ACCC have gone on record to say that for an expensive computer (anything that Apple sells, including phones, would qualify) - the consumer should receive a complete refund or a quick repair for minimum cost for the first 3 years.  For Apple to honour the local laws, it really should be bundling AppleCare with every product sold. The problem is, their competitors are not, and Apple aint gonna be the only company following the rules.  Whilst these laws are strong, the enforcement is negligible.  That doesn't stop local suppliers charging way more for their products and claiming the price difference is because of these laws, but not actually providing the service.  So yes, it is a total scam.  Here.  But not necessarily a scam elsewhere.   About 20 years ago this came to a head, and the Federal government did a big inquiry and the result of that came a recommenddation: all Australians should purchase any significant item via grey market import (ie: buy in USA  and buy international extended warranty and ship it here yourself) - even with all the added costs, it works out generally about 10% cheaper than buying it in Oz and relying on the 'statutory warranty'.  For me (any many/most other Apple customers), this is a business purchase, and the extra cost of AppleCare is just factored in to the cost of the product.  We wouldn't ever buy an Apple product without AppleCare.  But yes, technically, it's a total rip off, because the law here clearly states they should provide all those same services as part of the product cost (except theft, which until recently hasn't been available with AppleCare in OZ).

    You are confusing AppleCare+ with a manufacturer's warranty for defective parts.  AppleCare+ is that plus far more.   As has been pointed out in prior prior posts, they are NOT equivalent.
    watto_cobra
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