Apple, Google & others partnering to improve diversity in big tech

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A coalition of tech companies including Apple, Google, Snap, and Salesforce have teamed up with researchers to form the "Catalyze Tech" coalition to improve representation of minority groups in Silicon Valley.




After more than a year of research surrounding minority representation in big tech by the Aspen Institute and other researchers, the Action to Catalyze Tech report has been released. Following the publication of the Action to Catalyze Tech report, a wide array of Silicon Valley big tech companies have signed on to take action.

Over 30 CEOs and executives from leading technology organizations, including Airbnb, Apple, Dropbox, Etsy, Google, LinkedIn, Twitter, Salesforce, Spotify, and Uber, have committed to being founding signatories of the ACT Report, pledging to hold themselves and their companies accountable. Together, these founders represent more than 500,000 tech employees.

"The tech industry remains dominated by white men," said Vivian Schiller, Executive Director of Aspen Digital, a program of the Aspen Institute. "Justice for underrepresented communities requires sustained commitment, transparency, and accountability from leadership, and that's what we strive toward with Catalyze Tech. We are glad that so many tech companies are committing to implement recommendations made in this report, and eager to support the sector on the path to true equity."

A Bloomberg report on Thursday about the formation of the group includes stats about representation. While Hispanics make up 18% of the US population, they only represent 8% of employees in big tech. African-Americans represent 13% of the population, while only holding 5% of big tech jobs.

On November 3, Catalyze Tech will convene the first annual DEI Innovation Summit, which will bring together CEOs and leaders from signatory companies, DEI experts, and advocates to discuss cross-industry alignment, and how to put the report's recommendations into action.

"So often the tech industry moves fast and shoots for the stars -- yet when it comes to diversity and inclusion, the industry's progress has been agonizingly slow. It is long past time for urgency and accountability, and the ACT Report sets out a tangible roadmap for companies of all sizes," said Oona King, Vice President of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion at Snap Inc. and the Chair of the Catalyze Tech Working Group. "Collective action is key, and needs everyone in business -- from CEOs to interns -- to be inspired to act."

The full list of companies that have signed on to commit to the report's recommendations at launch are Airbnb; Apple; Ariel Investments; Cisco; DoorDash; Dropbox; Etsy; Google; Headspace Health; Justworks; LinkedIn; Maven; Netflix; Nextdoor; PwC; Ro; Salesforce; Snap; Spotify; Twitter; Uber; Vimeo; Warby Parker; and Wipro; along with PledgeLA and the companies that form the Alliance for Global Inclusion: Applied Materials, Dell, Intel, Micron Technology, Nasdaq, and NTT Data.

The working group that developed the report included experts and academics from AnitaB.org; Aspen Digital, a program of the Aspen Institute; Bennington College; Brookings Institution; Computing Alliance of Hispanic-Serving Institutions, University of Texas at El Paso; Constellations Center for Equity in Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology; Coqual; CSforAll; Expanding Diversity and Gender Equity in Tech Initiative at the University of California; Google; Harvard Business School; IncluSTEM; Kapor Center; LA-Tech.org; Management Leadership for Tomorrow; National Center for Women & Information Technology; Powered By Decisions, LLC; PwC; QSIDE Institute; Reboot Representation; Scholastic Education Solutions; Snap Inc.; University of Massachusetts Amherst; and the Women and Public Policy Program at the Harvard Kennedy School.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 6
    crowleycrowley Posts: 9,124member
    Brace for indignation...
  • Reply 2 of 6
    Where is the rule that says the makeup of any company/industry/organization must match EXACTLY the distribution of each minorities population percentage and that a failure to meet this criteria represents an injustice?
  • Reply 3 of 6
    Where is the rule that says the makeup of any company/industry/organization must match EXACTLY the distribution of each minorities population percentage and that a failure to meet this criteria represents an injustice?
    Scroll further down. It's in a different chapter than the one titled, "Preserving The Good Ol' Boy Network". 

    However, maybe you can direct me to where the phrase "must match EXACTLY the distribution of each minorities [SIC] population percentage" can be found. I don't see that anywhere. 
  • Reply 4 of 6
    As quoted in this article:

    "The tech industry remains dominated by white men," said Vivian Schiller, Executive Director of Aspen Digital, a program of the Aspen Institute. "Justice for underrepresented communities requires sustained commitment, transparency, and accountability from leadership, and that's what we strive toward with Catalyze Tech. We are glad that so many tech companies are committing to implement recommendations made in this report, and eager to support the sector on the path to true equity."

    Bloomberg report on Thursday about the formation of the group includes stats about representation. While Hispanics make up 18% of the US population, they only represent 8% of employees in big tech. African-Americans represent 13% of the population, while only holding 5% of big tech jobs.

    It's quite simple. Whenever proclamations of injustice are made, the racial makeup of the supposed injustice is compared to the racial makeup of the country as a whole.  The mismatch of the racial makeup of the perceived injustice to the total population is provided as the evidence of said injustice. This implies that racial disparity is in of itself an injustice that needs to be corrected. This is called begging the question and is a logical fallacy.
  • Reply 5 of 6
    As quoted in this article:

    This is called begging the question and is a logical fallacy.
    Social justice isn't logical. It's based on feelings, with the primary aim of achieving political power. You'll hear no complaints that there are too many men in prison (relative to women), or too few men teaching elementary school. 

    The type of people pushing this are the same ones who claim large companies are soul-less money grubbers who would sell their mother into slavery for a few bucks, but when it comes to hiring, they gleefully turn qualified candidates away because of some immutable characteristic that has no bearing on the job. 

    I worked in Silicon Valley for over 10 years, and as a white male, I was in the minority. I didn't care--my co-workers were hired and promoted on merit, as it should have been and should always be. 


  • Reply 6 of 6
    Not everyone can become a great artist, but a great artist can come from anywhere.” - Anton Ego, Ratatouille

    “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by their character.” - Martin Luther King Jr.

    I don’t care who you are, what skin shade you have, what gender you are.  Just be able to do the job, and do it well.

    Hiring to pad stats is hiring for the wrong reason, and the team will suffer as a result.
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