Safari Technology Preview includes support for 120Hz scrolling on MacBook Pro

Posted:
in Mac Software edited November 2021
Apple's latest Safari Technology Preview build includes support for scrolling animations at 120Hz screen refresh rates, a feature exclusive to the company's new MacBook Pro models with ProMotion.

Safari Technology Preview


Issued to developers and members of the public who are interested in testing out advanced Safari features, version 135 of Safari Technology Preview incorporates 120Hz scroll animations suitable for the new 14- and 16-inch MacBook Pro with ProMotion display.

Prior to today's release, owners of the MacBook Pro models complained of a lack of support for the laptops' screen refresh rates. Many apps, including Apple's own first-party titles like Safari, are not capable of pushing graphics up to 120Hz, the maximum allowance for ProMotion hardware.

It is unclear when 120Hz animations will trickle down to the shipping version of Safari, but when the feature is ready to ship, Apple will likely include it in an update to macOS Monterey.

In addition to 120Hz support, the latest Safari Technology Preview includes fixes and additions to Web Inspector and Web Driver, CSS updates, Web API changes including lazy image loading, a color space rendering patch, WebAuthn modifications and more.

Safari Technology Preview 135 can be downloaded from Apple's developer webpage.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 7
    The only person I know who didn’t immediately download Chrome to a new MacBook and set it as default is someone I know who rarely uses their laptop - everyone else I know uses Chrome.
  • Reply 2 of 7
    I very rarely use Chrome on my Mac. Only to visit websites that are poorly created and behave badly same in Safari on Mac or Edge on Windows.
  • Reply 3 of 7
    The only person I know who didn’t immediately download Chrome to a new MacBook and set it as default is someone I know who rarely uses their laptop - everyone else I know uses Chrome.
    Of course you do.

    I on the other hand have eliminated Chrome from my personal Macs - I found that the Chrome updater was eating an entire CPU engine due to poor coding.

    What's worse, the Chrome updater would run under various guises, and blame it's resource utilization on WindowManager, BDLDaemon, and any of a whole host of other processes. This made isolating the culprit especially difficult, until I ran into an article on AppleInsider on how to completely remove Chrome and it's updater.

    Once that was done, the 100% utilization of one of my engines problem stopped.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 4 of 7
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,022member
    The only person I know who didn’t immediately download Chrome to a new MacBook and set it as default is someone I know who rarely uses their laptop - everyone else I know uses Chrome.
    I’ve got two Chromium based browsers on my Mac, but neither are Chrome. Wouldn’t touch that with a 10 foot pole.

    And Safari is my general preference. The other browsers are for particular things.
  • Reply 5 of 7
    The only person I know who didn’t immediately download Chrome to a new MacBook and set it as default is someone I know who rarely uses their laptop - everyone else I know uses Chrome.
    I don't use Chrome and have no reason to.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 6 of 7
    Although i intensely dislike the new tab design in Safari, i stick to that. Switch to firefox on rare occasions when safari does not like a page. Would not touch google chrome with a ten foot barge pole !
  • Reply 7 of 7
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,235member
    I can’t stand Chrome. It’s ugly and doesn’t work correctly and many of Apple’s services don’t work properly with it.

    having said that, I played with the Technology Preview for a few minutes, as I’ve been using it for several years, then updated it and played around again. Truthfully, I couldn’t see much of a difference.
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