Tim Cook 'feels good' about Apple's Self Service Repair initiative

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 24
    Xed said:
    maximara said:
    Xed said:
    avon b7 said:
    Sometimes it is better for him not to say anything. This is one of those moments. When spin smells to much like spin it loses value fast. 

    The move itself is a good move. Now the best move would be to design for repair and make them easier to carry out.
    How is it spin? You are an Android shill but you are still smart enough to understand that Cook makes moves that he believes will benefit Apple, specifically Apple’s share price. If you think Cook was not part of this decision or that he failed understand the forces at play determine what was the best course of action for Apple then you really don’t understand why Apple is worth $2.5 trillion nor why it took in nearly $400 billion in revenue for 2021.
    Given designs are generally done two to three years in advance the shift in the iPhones had to have been made a while ago.  I think Apple itself was likely having issues repairing the ultra thin designs that the Steve Jobs-Jony Ive era produced.  The MacBooks appear to be getting thicker as will the iPhones.
    And? Are you not familiar with Apple not announcing changes until they're nearly ready to go?
    Apple isn't the only one designing insanely hard to repair things.  Stop pretending Apple are the only ones who do this.  Can you repair your own Xbox, your Sony playstation, your Samsung TV, or any thing else you own that has electronics?  Those don't have manual on how to repair them and some parts are like hen's teeth.  

    One of the most idiotic things I have seen the clueless right to repair group to want in people be able to repair medical equipment...with no mechanism in place to ensure the people doing the work were properly trained.  Thankfully that and other brain dead right to repair bills have died.

    "For years, ISOs have fought tooth and nail to avoid any accountability, even refusing to fill out registration paperwork with the FDA."  The last thing the US need is something akin to the 1987 disaster in Brazil happening because some ISO didn't train its people correctly.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 24
    XedXed Posts: 1,433member
    MplsP said:
    Xed said:
    avon b7 said:
    Xed said:
    avon b7 said:
    Sometimes it is better for him not to say anything. This is one of those moments. When spin smells to much like spin it loses value fast. 

    The move itself is a good move. Now the best move would be to design for repair and make them easier to carry out.
    How is it spin? You are an Android shill but you are still smart enough to understand that Cook makes moves that he believes will benefit Apple, specifically Apple’s share price. If you think Cook was not part of this decision or that he failed understand the forces at play determine what was the best course of action for Apple then you really don’t understand why Apple is worth $2.5 trillion nor why it took in nearly $400 billion in revenue for 2021.
    Apple has spent millions on lobbying against right to repair in general and made devices progressively harder to repair. Sometimes requiring non faulty or damaged parts to be replaced as part of a repair. It hasn't been able to guarantee its own staff won't damage a device on taking it apart. Case in point when I took an iPhone in for a battery replacement, I was required to sign a form accepting that the technician could break the device just by trying to get into it and in such case they would hand it back damaged or offer me a refurbished unit at a price I had to accept before handing the device over. This is because the devices are not designed for repair. They are geared for replacement.

    In all these years Apple has done little to nothing to give users options for self repair. 

    Now we get a surprise about turn in tactics and I'm sure it is because Apple sees itself under growing scrutiny and needs a few bones to throw out.

    Good moves, on the face of it but in no way in line with their previous practices. 

    Of course, the decision needs to be 'sold' (that's understandable from a marketing and PR perspective) but you can go too far. 

    Tim is spinning this as Apple doing good and helping users, leading us to believe they always had users front and foremost for repair. That isn't the case. Never has been. Even years ago a Scandinavian consumer body took Apple to task demonstrating a fault that Apple denied existed. Apple is always front and foremost. Fast forward and we have the question about that short screen connector in laptops which Apple denied is a problem in spite of making it longer in newer designs. 

    Like I said, when spin goes to far, it's better not to say anything and let commentators do the selling. So far, this move seems to have been well accepted. The devil will be in the details but on face value it is a move in the right direction. Just don't ask me to believe Apple decided to do this from internal will. This, IMO, is a direct result of external pressures. 

    The EU does not impose change without consultation. Apple has participated in discussions and knows what's likely coming down the pipe. We will surely see more efforts over the coming years to reverse current tactics on design and repair. 

    We can expect a lot more spin as Apple details its changes as 'voluntary' before directives come into effect. 

    1) You need to learn to write more succinctly instead of repeating yourself. Your verbal diarrhea is a bit much on the best of days.

    2) Again, this is not out of line for Apple. Their goal is what is best for Apple. If that means offering some repair guides, tools, and parts to benefit their bottom line in the long run then they'll do it. If they feel that it's best for them to stop they will. It's called business. Do I need to remind you of any of the countess other changes that  Apple and every other company makes when laws change, public opinion changes, tech changes. Just fucking enjoy that it's gong to be an option the time being.
    Actually, @"avon b7" made a very good argument and took the time to clearly state the different points of his argument and address likely counterarguments. Had s/he been more succinct you would have complained that s/he was just making arguments without any evidence.

    @"Avon b7" is right - Apple has spent a considerable amount of time and energy fighting right to repair initiatives. I'm glad they have changed course, but for Tim Cook to come out and make a bunch of glowing statements about how 'good it feels' rings pretty hollow. 
    Of course they've been fighting it. Now they're embracing it within a certain range. That's not spin, that's Apple altering course to maximize profits as paradigms shift. It's a simple course correction and we've seen it time and time again with Apple and every other company. Is Apple bringing back MagSafe spin or simply a realization that only having USB-C for power is not the best way to maximize sales of Mac notebooks?

    With this use of spin being defined as "a particular bias, interpretation, or point of view, intended to create a favorable (or sometimes, unfavorable) impression when presented to the public" it would be spin if Apple said that they'd love to offer up guides for repairing your own devices but can' for pathetic reasons. If you want to see examples of spin, read Avon's comments about Apple, which you've clearly fallen for. A company actually does something you've been wanting them to do and you cry foul. Let's just take the fucking win.
    Soli
  • Reply 23 of 24
    XedXed Posts: 1,433member
    maximara said:
    Xed said:
    maximara said:
    Xed said:
    avon b7 said:
    Sometimes it is better for him not to say anything. This is one of those moments. When spin smells to much like spin it loses value fast. 

    The move itself is a good move. Now the best move would be to design for repair and make them easier to carry out.
    How is it spin? You are an Android shill but you are still smart enough to understand that Cook makes moves that he believes will benefit Apple, specifically Apple’s share price. If you think Cook was not part of this decision or that he failed understand the forces at play determine what was the best course of action for Apple then you really don’t understand why Apple is worth $2.5 trillion nor why it took in nearly $400 billion in revenue for 2021.
    Given designs are generally done two to three years in advance the shift in the iPhones had to have been made a while ago.  I think Apple itself was likely having issues repairing the ultra thin designs that the Steve Jobs-Jony Ive era produced.  The MacBooks appear to be getting thicker as will the iPhones.
    And? Are you not familiar with Apple not announcing changes until they're nearly ready to go?
    Apple isn't the only one designing insanely hard to repair things.  Stop pretending Apple are the only ones who do this.  Can you repair your own Xbox, your Sony playstation, your Samsung TV, or any thing else you own that has electronics?  Those don't have manual on how to repair them and some parts are like hen's teeth.  

    One of the most idiotic things I have seen the clueless right to repair group to want in people be able to repair medical equipment...with no mechanism in place to ensure the people doing the work were properly trained.  Thankfully that and other brain dead right to repair bills have died.

    "For years, ISOs have fought tooth and nail to avoid any accountability, even refusing to fill out registration paperwork with the FDA."  The last thing the US need is something akin to the 1987 disaster in Brazil happening because some ISO didn't train its people correctly.
    Show where I "pretended" any such thing. How about where I said any such thing? You should have a rudimentary understanding of why a company would produce a product for the least expensive production option while being as durable as necessary. if this engineering focus escapes you then I can't help you.

    And none of that has any bearing on your odd comment about it taking 2-3 years for Apple to setup a way for parts and tools to be distributed because it takes years for Apple to design an SoC and iPhone.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 24 of 24
    DuhSesame said:
    ...this from the CEO at the helm of moving so much 'onboard' including T2 storage controllers...?  Really...?
    I understood shareholder activism pushed Apple to this shift...?
    How much of this is simply the latest 'spin'...?
    If your on-board solution can provide something better, by all means do it.
    For consideration: bartechtv.com/m1-mac-ssd-wear-probably-a-far-bigger-problem-than-it-appears/
    williamlondon
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