Dubious 'iPhone 15' SIM tray removal rumor given weight by leakers

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 24
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    Marvin said:
    I'm not sure that this is really up to Apple.
    An iPhone that can't connect to cell service would need to be renamed iBrick15.
    Apple has a list of providers worldwide offering eSim support:

    https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT209096

    Even if the available services are lacking, I'm sure that having over 200 million people requesting better support or moving to providers who do would be enough to encourage them.

    There's also the option to put physical sim cards in external cases:



    Apple can provide sim cases and these are easier to replace the cards in. Most people will use eSim services.

    The tray takes up way too much space for what it does (silver square on the left), they could probably add about 10% more battery without it:


    That's a good point:   Like the headphone jack, the SIM tray not only takes up very valuable space but is an access point for dirt, water and failure.  So yeh -- let's dump that thing!

    But, I hope Apple coordinates with the carriers before that happens.  I would hate to go back to the old days where you couldn't switch carriers without buying a new phone.
  • Reply 22 of 24
    Well, that is show stopper if you want to travel to foreign country and use store purchased SIM card with local phone number. Not all providers support eSIM. Good luck with iPhone. Want to know how much roaming and data services cost overseas even if you enable special travel program? Just check with AT&T, Verizon or T-Mobile. Learn for yourself. It looks like Apple would not leave people any option, but buy Android. Heck, some of them still may allow even flash card to extend storage memory unlike iPhone.
    Google Fi works on iPhone with an eSim and  doesn’t charge anything extra to use internationally.  
    williamlondon
  • Reply 23 of 24
    croprcropr Posts: 1,116member
    What makes you so certain that carriers in foreign countries will not support eSIM in a couple of years? Physical SIMs are bad for consumers. I’m definitely hoping that more and more carriers around the world start adopting it. That way you don’t even need to go to a carrier store and you could just switch to the local eSIM from your hotel room.
    In some uses cases a physical SIM card has its advantages.  Example: you drop your phone badly so it is no longer functioning.   Just by merely pulling the physical SIM card and put into a other phone (even from a different brand) and you can immediately continue making calls, texting messages and accessing the internet.
         
    The setup of a mobile phone with a physical SIM card owned by the mobile operator was conceived  with 2 major goals:  the end user could switch mobile operator by replacing the sim card with one from the new mobile operator and secondly the end user could switch phone brand by keeping the sim card but replacing phones.
    The eSIM card makes that 2nd objective more difficult, because the old phone brand and the new phone brand both must support an eSIM, which is as a general rule  not the case.

    You could argue that you will never switch brands and always stick to an iPhone, but other customers value such an option as important.  Saying that a physical SIM card is bad for customers is not valid for all customers.
    edited December 2021
  • Reply 24 of 24
    cropr said:
    What makes you so certain that carriers in foreign countries will not support eSIM in a couple of years? Physical SIMs are bad for consumers. I’m definitely hoping that more and more carriers around the world start adopting it. That way you don’t even need to go to a carrier store and you could just switch to the local eSIM from your hotel room.
    In some uses cases a physical SIM card has its advantages.  Example: you drop your phone badly so it is no longer functioning.   Just by merely pulling the physical SIM card and put into a other phone (even from a different brand) and you can immediately continue making calls, texting messages and accessing the internet.
         
    The setup of a mobile phone with a physical SIM card owned by the mobile operator was conceived  with 2 major goals:  the end user could switch mobile operator by replacing the sim card with one from the new mobile operator and secondly the end user could switch phone brand by keeping the sim card but replacing phones.
    The eSIM card makes that 2nd objective more difficult, because the old phone brand and the new phone brand both must support an eSIM, which is as a general rule  not the case.

    You could argue that you will never switch brands and always stick to an iPhone, but other customers value such an option as important.  Saying that a physical SIM card is bad for customers is not valid for all customers.
    You make some good points but I guess I’m expecting that eventually all phones will have eSIMs installed because of consumer demand. It’s a little bit of a hassle to have to switch the SIM from one phone to another and there actually are some consumers that need to have it done for them because they don’t feel comportable doing it themselves. Signing up for service with eSIM is much easier.
    williamlondon
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